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if you read my previous topic, I got some rough cut walnut at a good price. But I am unsure of the best way to get it ready for use.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


I was thinking using my delta 14" band saw to cut the sides as straight as possible, then using a jointer to get them level, then using a planer to get the surfaces nice and flat/smooth.

I am not sure what I am going to do with them yet, but I wouldnt mind getting them prepped and at least see what the grain will look like so that I can try to keep them in a good order so when I make something, I will know which pieces to use together.

Thanks for all help.
 

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I wouldn't prep it at all but I see your point of wanting it to see the grain pattern. I have measured and marked my stock to see how many BF I could get out of it. I have also just taken a hand planer to a few spots to look at the grain.
I will interesting to see what others have to say.
 

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I wouldn't do anything until I had a project in mind. Then rough cut your pieces a couple inches longer than needed and start by jointing one face and one edge, then plane just enough to show the grain, but still oversized. Also, rip the other edge parallel. Let the boards rest for a few days in the shop, then joint and plane again to final thickness. In the meantime, I would stack your boards in a pile that will not put unwanted stress on the boards. Lay them flat on each other or they could take on a bow or twist. Adding some weight on top wouldn't hurt. You can get an idea of the grain and color of the rough boards by taking a couple strokes here and there with a block plane.

Paul
 

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Are you asking "how you do final prep on rough lumber for use?" or "what should you do to the lumber in order to plan for use, even though you may be storing it for an extended time before actually using it?"
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
many of the boards are 12" wide, so how do I make them flat if most jointers are 6 to 8"s wide. Some videos I have watched, they say planers are not really used to make boards flat, just to get them to thickness.
 

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Too soon to plane them flat, IMHO. Let them acclimate first, so they don't move and change shape after planing.

FIRST: get them off the floor, stacked and stickered!!

When you're ready to use this stuff for a project, you will decide whether you need 12" boards, or 6" boards, or whatever.

THEN: Cut to rough length, rip to rough width, face-joint one face, joint one edge, plane to thickness, rip to width, cut to final length.

To face-joint a board that is wider than your jointer, you can use a planer sled
 

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most of the steps you want to take now like planing,jointing ,etc,you are going to do them again for a project so why do it twice?jerryminer has it right ,stack and sticker until you have specific plan.
many of the boards are 12" wide, so how do I make them flat if most jointers are 6 to 8"s wide. Some videos I have watched, they say planers are not really used to make boards flat, just to get them to thickness.

- FancyShoes
I cut them to 6" and use the jointer ,then reglue them.
 

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IF you have a cup/warp in your stock, sometimes you have to rip them to a useable width for your joiner then glue them back to size. So if you rip them to 6 inches then flatten them on the joiner/planer you will actually get thicker stock in the long run.
You can use your planer to flatten, I do it all the time. You have to take very shallow passes at a time, otherwise it will push to hard on the board and you wont flatten it. It will work if you absolutely have to, definitely not the preferred method though. It really doesn't work if it is cupped and warped or the cup is bad.

This is my best illustration I could do so don't laugh to load. If that makes sense on what to do then you are a better man then I. If you cut the larger board into smaller width, then the cup is smaller so you loose less thickness. Hope that helps.

Face Head Eye Sleeve Automotive design
 

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What I would definitely not do is to cut roughly straight edges on the band saw-that's a lot of work that will all have to be re-done.

Rule #1 of woodworking-you want straight, flat boards. To do that you need jointing and planing. You can joint boards with planes, a jointer, or a planer or router jig. The latter two are a lot more time consuming. You can definitely get flatter boards with a planer by itself, but it is also easy to think you've gotten it flat with the planer only to realize later it isn't actually flat-btw, 8/4 boards are thick enough not to bend in a planer-those work better.

I think you'll find that, given whatever equipment you might have, you'll have to develop a strategy to use 12" wide boards without a monster jointer. An of the alternate methods will work, but that'll be some work.
 

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Don't mess with them yet. If you want to see some grain, that is fine. Send a few through the planer just for kicks, but do no more. Dimensioning that stuff right now is asking for it later. You'll get done and say, "great, a big pile of s4s lumber ready to go when I am." You'll come back next year and say, "Who came in here and bent all my boards up?"

Sticker em and let it be.

As far as the wide boards go, there are lots of ways to go about it- planer sled, handplanes, router sled, buying a huge jointer. I have dealt with this quite a bit.

If your boards will be used in relatively short lengths in the final product, you might be able to get by just using a planer. They might be a little out of square, but still usable. I wouldn't really suggest this unless you are ok with boards being a little out of square.

I honestly cut it all down to fit the jointer, then glue it back up. If I NEED it to remain a wide board, I handplane one side to flat and then use the planer to get the other side flat. It really doesn't take as long as you'd think.
 

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I just put this video together the other day that shows how I do this with my router jig. You could make something similar to what I did but make it a lot longer. It works great and results in a very smooth board that is exactly the dimension I want. I don't have a planer or jointer, so i have to do everything this way.

 

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I'm with the rest on waiting until you have a project in mind before flattening. It's simple math…For example:

If you have an 8 foot board, 8/4 thick, with a 1/2 bow in in it, To get it flat will mean taking off 1/2 inch from each face, leaving you with only a 4/4 board. However, If you decide later you really only need two 4-foot boards and haven't flattened them yet, that bow will only be 1/8 for each board, in which case you can have 6/4 thick boards when you are finished flattening them. Less waste.

This works in all directions. If you cut your pieces to rough size before flattening, you will always end up with more wood, not needlessly taking away extra wood for no reason. (You can still plane one of them just to see the grain, but don't do all of them.)
 
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