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So thanks to some awesome users here I have a jack plane and a No. 5 Stanley. I also have some crosscut/rip cut disston/superior handsaws. I also have 7 jorgensens 3736 heavy duty bar clamps.

Thanks to some extra work I have done I have a budget of $350 for some new/old hand tools.

My question to you all is what your opinion is to bring my hand tool collection closer to completion to where I can complete some simple projects like bookshelves, end tables, and coffee tables etc.

What I have listed above is all I have as tools. I have no sharpening stones or files either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much and a good idea in waiting till I start a project but I am sure that there is some tools I know I will be needing like the sharpening stone and guide. A try square, maybe another hand plane, dovetail saw?
 

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Like i said from experience, it's tough to buy without knowing what you will need Spazy.

My first project was a box for my guitar amp. I knew i needed glue, clamps and a sander. That's what i bought.

As my skills progressed, i could build new things, and as i came onto new challenges, i needed new tools.

It's just my opinion. I'm sure they're tools you could buy that you would need.

A set of the Stanley SW chisels is a good buy at $100. I bought a set and love em, light, comfortable and hold a nice edge.

If you're looking for a square i like the old stanley Rosewood/brass a LOT. They're found in many different sizes. I also use machinist squares frequently too.

I've liked having a digital caliper for checking various measurements. A lot of people say it isn't necessary, but i like to use them to check dados, rabbets, router grooves etc for consistency.
 

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Some bench chisels. Good starter sizes would be 1/2" 1/4". Like older Marples blue handle are inexpensive. A rasp like an old US made Nicholson no. 49. A mallet. Go slow. Get what you need as the project demands. Have fun!
 

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I'll second some chisels…and also some kind of drill (powered or manual, your preference). Probably some kind of smaller saw (dovetails saw, or carcass saw). and a Combination square.
 

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For $350, you can get a LOT of good vintage tools. The block plane (60 1/2) as suggested by Don should be near the top of your list ($30-$40), a smoothing plane like a Stanley #4 ($40-$50), a decent set of starter chisels, ($50-$60), some sort of sharpening set up ( you can get the Lee Valley mylar set for less than $30 and they will get you started. They won't last forever, but they'll be good for now). A router plane will run you $50-$75 and they are quite useful, and a rabbet plane like a Stanley 78 ($50-$60). Both of theses planes will (IMHO) be very helpful in making bookcases/shelving. Now you have a pretty good set of tools and still have money left. The prices I used are based on what I believe these tools sell for. Shipping might cost a bit, but if you buy from the sellers around here (like DonW and some others), you should get a tool that's ready to go to work when you take it out of the box. With the money left over, buy some marking tools and wood.
 

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I agree that the best way is to start building something and get exactly the tools you need as you go- that way you never get anything you'll never use!

That being said, sharpening stones you will use without a doubt, and a square. And as stated before, a drill of some kind.

If you're a married guy, here's the Deep Dark Secret: buy your tools with your wife in mind. Some years ago due to the colorful vagaries of life I found myself starting over from absolute zero. The first thing I got was a combination oilstone and sharpened all the kitchen knives. Then I got a cheapo gentleman's saw, a chisel, a sliding bevel and a square, and built her a table from salvaged industrial flooring, which she's using at this very moment. It's been easy sailing ever since, heh heh.
 
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