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Much appreciated if someone can comment on this. I recently obtained some maple logs the day after the tree was cut down. Note that the tree was nearly dead. A couple days later, I slabbed the logs and applied latex paint to the ends of the segments. At this time, I noticed white fuzzy mold (mycelium?) which grew very quickly on the face of many of these newly-cut slabs. Hygrometer showed that the interior of the slabs was about 25% wet the day after it was slabbed. The intended use for this wood is mostly to make cutting boards.

QUESTION: Is this wood problematic in any way? Is it still usable? Any concerns with using this wood as a food prep interface?

Thanks in advance.
Wood Bedrock Tints and shades Rectangle Automotive tire
 

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You already have some spalting based on black lines showing. :p

IMHO - Spalted wood should not be used for end grain cutting boards. Varnished/finished cheese boards would be OK, but would never use it if wood was not sealed from food contact.
You can never kill all the old mold/fungus that grows inside. Many folks have allergies to mold, and depending on sensitivity level; could get sick eating anything that comes in contact with those wood molds. The internal effect of black mold consumption on regular person would be just eating a bad mushroom.....
 

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While the surface may only read 25% MC, deeper inside may be closer to 50%. The sooner it dries out the sooner that will stop happening. You could try setting it out in direct sunlight so that the surface dries a little faster but you risk having the ends crack. Removing the pith from can help minimize cracking but may not eliminate it. Unless you or someone in your home is especially sensitive to molds and fungus, I would not worry about it. Set it aside where it can dry and let the spalting occur and you will have something cool a couple of years from now. If the goal is to eventually turn a bowl or something, just rough turn it now and let it dry for a few months. I usually pack rough wet bowls in a paper bag in the shavings from the rough turning to more gradually dry out the bowl but it is a good idea to sort of fluff the shavings every day or two for the first week or so to minimize mold growing on the bowl. If I am less patient, I will use the microwave to dry out the rough bowl more quickly which will also help kill any fungus in the wood, though may not sterilize it completely.
 

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+1 for Lazymans info. I would also suggest that when you work with the wood you wear a dust mask just in case you are sensitive to the air born mold particles. I have cut a lot of maple and I usually cut it int0 slabs up to 5" thick and a few inches longer than it is wide to allow for end checking. Then stack it in a cool dry place with a tarp over it. It can take up to 2 or more years to dry and some of it will crack....almost unavoidable without a kiln.
If you should like the spalting (black lines) that takes place try leaving some in a damp place for a couple of months, then dry it.
Good luck.
 
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