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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Router Sled

Last summer I posted this project--My Router Table Sled
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/17463
It just hit me, I never really showed how the jig could be used. Here is a practical application.
I was actually building another jig and needed to slot some small pieces for adjustments. I posted a similar jig last week. I needed another. This one is tweaked a bit.


I planed down a scrap of Mahogany I had laying around. (Sorry-no Bubinga) The Mahogany matched my sled
--if you're into that sort of anal irrelavant stuff. Obviously I am!

Then I drilled a starter hole for the slots. If you have a router lift in you table, you could also plunge up from the bottom to start the cut.


The router sled is perfect for this. It is really safe, and not difficult to set up since I designed it to be versatile.

Next, measure the fence to place the cut where it's needed.

Place the work piece in the sled. Note the way I clamped this. My aluminum clamps are not long enough to reach the work piece. I will make some wooden clamps just like what I'm making now to fix that problem. Using a scrap works for now. I have the bit already at the proper height, coming up through the starter hole. Here I used a 1/4" bit. The slot is wider, so I made three passes. One down the middle, moved the fence a little and made two more passes to widen the slot.


I finished with a file to clean up the ends. If you use the right size bit, you don't need to do this. The way I did it, the end of the slots are not totally rounded if that matters to you.


Thanks for looking
 

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Router Sled

Last summer I posted this project--My Router Table Sled
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/17463
It just hit me, I never really showed how the jig could be used. Here is a practical application.
I was actually building another jig and needed to slot some small pieces for adjustments. I posted a similar jig last week. I needed another. This one is tweaked a bit.


I planed down a scrap of Mahogany I had laying around. (Sorry-no Bubinga) The Mahogany matched my sled
--if you're into that sort of anal irrelavant stuff. Obviously I am!

Then I drilled a starter hole for the slots. If you have a router lift in you table, you could also plunge up from the bottom to start the cut.


The router sled is perfect for this. It is really safe, and not difficult to set up since I designed it to be versatile.

Next, measure the fence to place the cut where it's needed.

Place the work piece in the sled. Note the way I clamped this. My aluminum clamps are not long enough to reach the work piece. I will make some wooden clamps just like what I'm making now to fix that problem. Using a scrap works for now. I have the bit already at the proper height, coming up through the starter hole. Here I used a 1/4" bit. The slot is wider, so I made three passes. One down the middle, moved the fence a little and made two more passes to widen the slot.


I finished with a file to clean up the ends. If you use the right size bit, you don't need to do this. The way I did it, the end of the slots are not totally rounded if that matters to you.


Thanks for looking
That's a nice jig, looks like its really well thought out. Thanks for giving us a look.
 

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Router Sled

Last summer I posted this project--My Router Table Sled
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/17463
It just hit me, I never really showed how the jig could be used. Here is a practical application.
I was actually building another jig and needed to slot some small pieces for adjustments. I posted a similar jig last week. I needed another. This one is tweaked a bit.


I planed down a scrap of Mahogany I had laying around. (Sorry-no Bubinga) The Mahogany matched my sled
--if you're into that sort of anal irrelavant stuff. Obviously I am!

Then I drilled a starter hole for the slots. If you have a router lift in you table, you could also plunge up from the bottom to start the cut.


The router sled is perfect for this. It is really safe, and not difficult to set up since I designed it to be versatile.

Next, measure the fence to place the cut where it's needed.

Place the work piece in the sled. Note the way I clamped this. My aluminum clamps are not long enough to reach the work piece. I will make some wooden clamps just like what I'm making now to fix that problem. Using a scrap works for now. I have the bit already at the proper height, coming up through the starter hole. Here I used a 1/4" bit. The slot is wider, so I made three passes. One down the middle, moved the fence a little and made two more passes to widen the slot.


I finished with a file to clean up the ends. If you use the right size bit, you don't need to do this. The way I did it, the end of the slots are not totally rounded if that matters to you.


Thanks for looking
Kent Nice series of photos. Yes I assmume that you would have gotten that clamp situation all figured out before this.

I would use hold down clamps on aboard that would slide on slots like your fence. Of cource a couple on your fence would help the other side.
 

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Router Sled

Last summer I posted this project--My Router Table Sled
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/17463
It just hit me, I never really showed how the jig could be used. Here is a practical application.
I was actually building another jig and needed to slot some small pieces for adjustments. I posted a similar jig last week. I needed another. This one is tweaked a bit.


I planed down a scrap of Mahogany I had laying around. (Sorry-no Bubinga) The Mahogany matched my sled
--if you're into that sort of anal irrelavant stuff. Obviously I am!

Then I drilled a starter hole for the slots. If you have a router lift in you table, you could also plunge up from the bottom to start the cut.


The router sled is perfect for this. It is really safe, and not difficult to set up since I designed it to be versatile.

Next, measure the fence to place the cut where it's needed.

Place the work piece in the sled. Note the way I clamped this. My aluminum clamps are not long enough to reach the work piece. I will make some wooden clamps just like what I'm making now to fix that problem. Using a scrap works for now. I have the bit already at the proper height, coming up through the starter hole. Here I used a 1/4" bit. The slot is wider, so I made three passes. One down the middle, moved the fence a little and made two more passes to widen the slot.


I finished with a file to clean up the ends. If you use the right size bit, you don't need to do this. The way I did it, the end of the slots are not totally rounded if that matters to you.


Thanks for looking
Looks good Kent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
very cool setup, and like you said, I think this is the first reference to using it with the saw fence for ripping. everywhere else references cross cutting notches.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Nice setup. I think you are the first in using it for ripping. I'll be using that method in my box class with my Disposable Kerfmaker.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
COOL… Clever… Slick… Yeah man!
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
I seem to recall seeing someone who has a video showing it being used in a similar way but one the table top instead of the rail. The stop block used one of those on or off magnet things. If I should have a eureka moment and remember where I saw it I'll post it.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
That is really nifty, thanks for posting this.
Kevin
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Nice write up. Good use of magnets.

In our original video, at from 1:28 to 1:40 we do the same thing with the KM-1 used on the table saw rail.

Paul Marcel also has a fantastic video about the Kerfmaker on his blog:
Half Inch Shy http://www.halfinchshy.com/
Kerfmaker Video:
!

Have fun!
Michael
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Thanks Michael, I thought I watched your video, but I missed that. Obviously we were on the same track. Thanks

Note: My jig will work the same on either side of the fence, or even on top of the saw like the Half Inch Shy video Michael suggested.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Kent, I like your magnet method.

Interesting accounts ( BridgeCityMike and jjeconomaki ). We are being watched. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
rance,----I actually invited them to "watch". I believe it makes good sense for the manufacturers to be in tune with the end users. There are many companies that keep an eye on what we do here.

Thanks to everyone for the positive comments.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Cool set up.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


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There is nothing like a new jig. Great idea Kent.
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Great idea!

Now all I have to find are some magnets that will work on my aluminium top!
 

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Kerfmaker--Table Saw Set-up

There has been much discussion on the Bridge City Kerfmaker, but I didn't find where it was used on a table saw without using a sled with a stop. I am sure I just missed it, but here is my version of the set-up.

The Kerfmaker references off a stop on a fence, which works very well for a fence on a radial arm saw or table saw sled. But using the table saw fence to cut slots for my box bottoms and lids, I discovered there was not reference point for the Kerfmaker. I made a simple block using magnets to secure it. There is a lip on the bottom to keep it straight on the table saw rail. I started with 2 magnets, but it didn't hold as well as I wanted, so I added 2 more. Stronger magnets would work as well, but these were what I had. I tried it with a c-clamp, but if you have checked out my jigs, you know I don't like messing with c-clamps on my jigs.

Set the fence for the first cut and place the kermaker on the rail and place the stop next to it, carefully keeping it free from chips and squared with the rail. The lip on my block is made to fit between the rail and the saw to help do this. Make the first cut, flip the kerfmaker as usual, move the fence, and make the second cut. Then saw out the waste between as usual. I am not going into detail of using your kerfmaker. If you have one you should know the basics already. That has been covered here on Ljs and on Bridge Ciy's website.

I think the pictures are self-explanatory, but ask if you have questions.
Tool Wood Table saws Gas Machine tool


Wood Floor Automotive exterior Bumper Gas


Gas Trigger Gun accessory Composite material Air gun


Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Wood Gun accessory


Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Rectangle Gas


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Table Rectangle Beige Hardwood
Great idea, now I have new use for my kerfmakers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Dust Collection

I have owned a Jet Dust collector for some time now, and have always hated emptying the bag. Recently, one of my customers offered to swap this cyclone from a school wood shop for a product in my store. It was perfect for my needs so I jumped on the opportunity. Having several pieces for the duct work already, I did not have to buy much to get it set up and going, The worst part was finding the time! Using 5″ flex hose I rerouted the air flow to go through the cyclone. The bag only gets what little goes through the filter on the dust collector.
Engineering Gas Cylinder Composite material Machine

Engineering Gas Composite material Machine Cylinder

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Automotive tire Gas Engineering Metal Machine

I got really lucky finding this, but there are after market cyclones available from Woodcraft and other sources. The size of this one was perfect for my shop and system. Years ago I found some larger cyclones from a cotton gin that closed that were used at my door shop. In fact, the fan also came from a gin. Great way to build a system if you live where cotton is prevalent like I do. I built that system about thirty years ago and it is still going strong. We dump that system into a couple of custom made trailers we have. Most of those shavings go to horse barns for bedding in stalls.

Thanks for looking!
 

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Dust Collection

I have owned a Jet Dust collector for some time now, and have always hated emptying the bag. Recently, one of my customers offered to swap this cyclone from a school wood shop for a product in my store. It was perfect for my needs so I jumped on the opportunity. Having several pieces for the duct work already, I did not have to buy much to get it set up and going, The worst part was finding the time! Using 5″ flex hose I rerouted the air flow to go through the cyclone. The bag only gets what little goes through the filter on the dust collector.
Engineering Gas Cylinder Composite material Machine

Engineering Gas Composite material Machine Cylinder

Automotive tire Gas Automotive wheel system Wood Cylinder

Automotive tire Gas Engineering Metal Machine

I got really lucky finding this, but there are after market cyclones available from Woodcraft and other sources. The size of this one was perfect for my shop and system. Years ago I found some larger cyclones from a cotton gin that closed that were used at my door shop. In fact, the fan also came from a gin. Great way to build a system if you live where cotton is prevalent like I do. I built that system about thirty years ago and it is still going strong. We dump that system into a couple of custom made trailers we have. Most of those shavings go to horse barns for bedding in stalls.

Thanks for looking!
That is a lot of stuff to MOVE!!
 

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