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Doors and Drawers

I would have waited until I made more progress until posting this next one, but since I have been stuck in bed with the flue for three days (and I am good for nothin' in the shop) I may as well post what I've got. The following was done before I got sick.

I am keeping the joinery as simple as possible on this project. I want it to look nice but it mostly needs to be functional. So I used simple grooved "style and rails" for the doors and drawer fronts, with more of that birch ply in for the panels. This way I can just glue the whole thing up and not even have to think about wood movement. I would rather use the time that it would take to do something fancier on another project. This phase of the project was pretty quick.

Here are the styles and rails milled and cut to size:



Here I have cut the grove with a dado blade to accept the plywood:



Making sure everything fits:



Here everything is laid out and ready for assembly:



But wait! Why didn't I just glue 'em up? Well it turns out that in my haste to just get this thing done I made the groves a little too narrow for the plywood to fit without crumpling the birch veneer on the edges. So, measure twice, cut once, right? Well if I widen the grove the rails won't fit the styles. So My only option is to trim a little thickness off the edges of the plywood. Oh well, no big deal.

So when I get to feeling better I will complete that last step and glue the darned things up. Thanks for tuning in.
Just set up a rabbit bit in the router and trim on the back side of the panel, Nobody can see it and it will function just fine. Probably only need to take off 1/32 anyway.
 

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Doors and Drawers

I would have waited until I made more progress until posting this next one, but since I have been stuck in bed with the flue for three days (and I am good for nothin' in the shop) I may as well post what I've got. The following was done before I got sick.

I am keeping the joinery as simple as possible on this project. I want it to look nice but it mostly needs to be functional. So I used simple grooved "style and rails" for the doors and drawer fronts, with more of that birch ply in for the panels. This way I can just glue the whole thing up and not even have to think about wood movement. I would rather use the time that it would take to do something fancier on another project. This phase of the project was pretty quick.

Here are the styles and rails milled and cut to size:



Here I have cut the grove with a dado blade to accept the plywood:



Making sure everything fits:



Here everything is laid out and ready for assembly:



But wait! Why didn't I just glue 'em up? Well it turns out that in my haste to just get this thing done I made the groves a little too narrow for the plywood to fit without crumpling the birch veneer on the edges. So, measure twice, cut once, right? Well if I widen the grove the rails won't fit the styles. So My only option is to trim a little thickness off the edges of the plywood. Oh well, no big deal.

So when I get to feeling better I will complete that last step and glue the darned things up. Thanks for tuning in.
Tom's got it. I'd probably scribe a line with a knife to keep the cut clean at the veneer, but I as someone recently and rightly observed "You sure are one for doing it the hard way Doug."

I would never have thought to tablesaw the stub tenon rails and stiles. Great job of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Doors and Drawers

I would have waited until I made more progress until posting this next one, but since I have been stuck in bed with the flue for three days (and I am good for nothin' in the shop) I may as well post what I've got. The following was done before I got sick.

I am keeping the joinery as simple as possible on this project. I want it to look nice but it mostly needs to be functional. So I used simple grooved "style and rails" for the doors and drawer fronts, with more of that birch ply in for the panels. This way I can just glue the whole thing up and not even have to think about wood movement. I would rather use the time that it would take to do something fancier on another project. This phase of the project was pretty quick.

Here are the styles and rails milled and cut to size:



Here I have cut the grove with a dado blade to accept the plywood:



Making sure everything fits:



Here everything is laid out and ready for assembly:



But wait! Why didn't I just glue 'em up? Well it turns out that in my haste to just get this thing done I made the groves a little too narrow for the plywood to fit without crumpling the birch veneer on the edges. So, measure twice, cut once, right? Well if I widen the grove the rails won't fit the styles. So My only option is to trim a little thickness off the edges of the plywood. Oh well, no big deal.

So when I get to feeling better I will complete that last step and glue the darned things up. Thanks for tuning in.
Well Douglas, you may have noticed that my router table is missing a few things… mainly the router :)

My router plate is still on the slow boat, apparently!

I did plan to use the dado blade to take off a hair from the back side of the plywood but your Idea to scribe it first is genius. I hadn't thought of that yet. I would have torn it up without that little scribe line.
 

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Doors and Drawers

I would have waited until I made more progress until posting this next one, but since I have been stuck in bed with the flue for three days (and I am good for nothin' in the shop) I may as well post what I've got. The following was done before I got sick.

I am keeping the joinery as simple as possible on this project. I want it to look nice but it mostly needs to be functional. So I used simple grooved "style and rails" for the doors and drawer fronts, with more of that birch ply in for the panels. This way I can just glue the whole thing up and not even have to think about wood movement. I would rather use the time that it would take to do something fancier on another project. This phase of the project was pretty quick.

Here are the styles and rails milled and cut to size:



Here I have cut the grove with a dado blade to accept the plywood:



Making sure everything fits:



Here everything is laid out and ready for assembly:



But wait! Why didn't I just glue 'em up? Well it turns out that in my haste to just get this thing done I made the groves a little too narrow for the plywood to fit without crumpling the birch veneer on the edges. So, measure twice, cut once, right? Well if I widen the grove the rails won't fit the styles. So My only option is to trim a little thickness off the edges of the plywood. Oh well, no big deal.

So when I get to feeling better I will complete that last step and glue the darned things up. Thanks for tuning in.
Why can't you widen the groove and the tenons? You can just add a little material by gluing to each tenon. You won't see it. Either way or rabbet.
 

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Doors and Drawers

I would have waited until I made more progress until posting this next one, but since I have been stuck in bed with the flue for three days (and I am good for nothin' in the shop) I may as well post what I've got. The following was done before I got sick.

I am keeping the joinery as simple as possible on this project. I want it to look nice but it mostly needs to be functional. So I used simple grooved "style and rails" for the doors and drawer fronts, with more of that birch ply in for the panels. This way I can just glue the whole thing up and not even have to think about wood movement. I would rather use the time that it would take to do something fancier on another project. This phase of the project was pretty quick.

Here are the styles and rails milled and cut to size:



Here I have cut the grove with a dado blade to accept the plywood:



Making sure everything fits:



Here everything is laid out and ready for assembly:



But wait! Why didn't I just glue 'em up? Well it turns out that in my haste to just get this thing done I made the groves a little too narrow for the plywood to fit without crumpling the birch veneer on the edges. So, measure twice, cut once, right? Well if I widen the grove the rails won't fit the styles. So My only option is to trim a little thickness off the edges of the plywood. Oh well, no big deal.

So when I get to feeling better I will complete that last step and glue the darned things up. Thanks for tuning in.
I have no doubt that we would never have known it happened once you take care of it. Looking really good Blake and thanks for blogging this.
 

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Doors and Drawers

I would have waited until I made more progress until posting this next one, but since I have been stuck in bed with the flue for three days (and I am good for nothin' in the shop) I may as well post what I've got. The following was done before I got sick.

I am keeping the joinery as simple as possible on this project. I want it to look nice but it mostly needs to be functional. So I used simple grooved "style and rails" for the doors and drawer fronts, with more of that birch ply in for the panels. This way I can just glue the whole thing up and not even have to think about wood movement. I would rather use the time that it would take to do something fancier on another project. This phase of the project was pretty quick.

Here are the styles and rails milled and cut to size:



Here I have cut the grove with a dado blade to accept the plywood:



Making sure everything fits:



Here everything is laid out and ready for assembly:



But wait! Why didn't I just glue 'em up? Well it turns out that in my haste to just get this thing done I made the groves a little too narrow for the plywood to fit without crumpling the birch veneer on the edges. So, measure twice, cut once, right? Well if I widen the grove the rails won't fit the styles. So My only option is to trim a little thickness off the edges of the plywood. Oh well, no big deal.

So when I get to feeling better I will complete that last step and glue the darned things up. Thanks for tuning in.
Gonna be one nice router table when you get it finished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
It's lookin' really nice Blake. But your idea with milling a groove for the bisquets, although sound, actually leaves you with less glueing surface and a weaker joint on the plywood. The better thing you could've done would be to install a hardwood "spline" for the length of your groove. Your cabinet has many other glueing and fastening points that will beef up its strength, so I don't believe you'll have any problems. If you do though notice a future joint failure, back it up with wood blocks.

Gonna look real nice when it's done!
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Hey Blake, check out the features on this router table project. I like the bit storage and dust collection ideas.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/555
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Sweet table Blake. I've got one in the works myslef as part of my shop re-hab but my day job has kept me from completing it. I'm hoping to get back at it soon.
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Very nice Blake. Great design. Thanks for showing!
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
That has become a very neat cabinet and router table, Blake. It seems to me it would have been less effort to just build regular drawers. I also agree with Daoo about having less glue area. I'm sure it will be fine. On my saddle shop work bench I used a simple lock rabbit for the corners of the drawers. It was done on the table saw and has seen constant hard use for the last 17 years with heavy contents.
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Great Blake. I like the cabinet Idea. I might have to reorganize my design. I noticed my router table top has bowed over the years.
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Looking sweet! That is going to be a nice router table. As far as drawer construction goes I like to rabbett the front in and dado the back, route a 1/4" groove all the way around for the bottom and glue and shoot the whole thing together with brads. I use Baltic birch ply for extra strength.This makes a very strong drawer thats easy to machine and assemble. I have also just done quick ones, butt jointing the ends into the sides and locking the whole thing together by glueing and shooting the bottom on. I make a small jig to keep everything square while assembling. This method works good for light duty drawers.
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Way to go Blake. For another quick add to ply drawers, try some iron on birch edge banding on the top edges. Just iron it on, and route back the overhang with a flush cut bit. You can buy it at the big box stores.

Kind of dissapointed to see that ball peen hammer instead of your maple mallet :)
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
I'm envious, Blake. You are doing a terrific job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Dadoo, you are right about the fact that that joint will be weaker. But I think for these drawers it will hold together ok. They will be relatively light duty. And easy to replace if they fall apart.

Spalm, my mallet was close at hand for whacking the parts together and into alignment. I did use it a lot on that project. But that little ball peen was perfect for sinking the biscuits into the slot… they were just a little tight. That hammer is actually one of my favorite tools. It's short handle and small size makes it perfect for when I just need a little localized persuasion. "Tap tap tap."

I promise I won't do the "biscuit slot" again, fellas. But I just want to get 'er done. And it was either that or brad nails through my nice birch ply (which I would like to avoid if possible).

Wait, or the rabbet method, but I didn't think that really worked on plywood? Does plywood hold together with just a glued rabbet??? ...oh I just read your post more carefully… Lock Rabbets or rabbets with nails. Ok, that would hold.

Thanks for the comments and advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Darn, I just realized something. Even if I fill the thing with brad nails they are covered up by the drawer slide!!!

OK, so I am just gonna fill those things with nails all they way across. That will reinforce the joint. Maybe even screws with pilot holes? Wow. I wish I had just done that in the first place. That would have really been faster.

Hindsight is 50/50. Live and learn.
 

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Finishing Touches

I've been adding the details as I have had time here and there after work.

I finally got my router plate (Incra Magni-lock) which I had to special order through Woodcraft because as far as I could tell nobody carries it. Woodcraft had to order it from Incra and have it shipped to them before shipping it to me. This is what I got:



I liked the actual Incra router plate better than the woodpecker brand version. And after it finally arrived in the mail I was pretty glad I had chosen it. That magni-lock system is pretty nice. I also ordered the extra ring set. Eleven different sizes in all.

Here are the cabinet doors in place: (I got anxious and installed them before I even sanded them. So I might have to remove the doors to do some sanding later)



Now for the drawers… I got the pieces cut to size (more birch plywood):



Then I started setting up to biscuit-joint the drawers together but it started turning into a nightmare of aligning, labeling, marking, cutting, etc., for each part of each drawer. I love the biscuit jointer. But this time it seemed to be taking more time than saving it.

So I came up with an idea: Cut the biscuit slots all in one pass with the dado blade on the table saw. This way I wouldn't have to worry about marking each biscuit position. I had never heard of anyone doing this before. Have you tried it or heard of anybody doing this? I gave it a test run:





It seemed to work just fine. The single dado blade was the same width as the biscuit cutter. And with the way I set up the fence in relationship to the dado blade I was able to do the edges and faces with the same set up:



The continuous biscuit slot worked beautifully and saved a ton of time. I was able to just tap the biscuits in wherever I wanted and didn't need to do any marking first.





Here is a finished drawer without the drawer front. I made the drawer fronts already but I have to install the drawers in the slides first so I know how to align the fronts. You can also see the first (top) drawer which has already been installed in the cabinet:



I wouldn't recommend this method for fine cabinetry but it sure is practical for something like this.

It will be nice to have the drawers in place. As you can see in one of the above pictures I installed the Incra positioner and fence. I guess I forgot to take pictures that day. The next thing I need to do is work on making a precise template to rout out the resess for the router plate.

Oh, I also forgot to show you pictures of the hardwood edge-band I put around the formika/particle board table top (Sorry). It is 1/2" thick and I screwed and glued it to the edges with epoxy and then plugged the screw holes. That is the first time I have ever used my plug cutter! That is a slick little drill bit. I will take some more pix of some of these details next time I am in the shop.
Blake,

One thing you might want to do is laminate the top. I have laminated MDF as the top and it surely helps a lot (pieces slide much better). Might be too late though.

Alin
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Tedious details... Gettin' there

Here's what I have accomplished in the past week or so…

Drawers:
So last time I talked about my drawer construction and my not-so-orthodox method of "biscuit-slotting" them together (the "don't try this at home, kids" method). I got scolded for that a little, and for good reason. It probably wouldn't have lasted as long. So I ended up just shooting them full of brads to reinforce them since I figured out that the brads would be hidden by the slides anyway.

By the way, here is how the drawers started out:



So I then I [correctly] biscuit jointed the drawer fronts on to the drawers:



I clamped and Glued (this picture is really just to show off some new clamps I got!):



And Here is the result:





OH MY GAWD! I am glad to have that out of the way. So, what's next? Finally, time to get that router plate installed. I have been putting this off because I am a little scared. What reason could I possibly have to punch a big hole in a perfectly good table? Oh yea, it's a router table. Ok, here goes…

I had been agonizing about how to make the template to rout the opening. I have already spent enough money on this project and didn't want to buy one, plus shipping, etc.

The corners of the plate are rounded to a 1 1/2" radius. Ideally they would have been a radius small enough to match one of my template router bits with bearings. That way I could have just made a rectangle template and the router bit would take care of the radius.

But no, Incra had to get all fancy with their 1 1/2" round corners. So creating that inside radius became the next challence. What I did was drill a hole in a piece of plywood with a 1 1/2" forstner bit and carefully cut away the waste so I was left with four corners around the hole that were barely held together (I wish I had taken a photo of that). Then the four corners easily broke apart.

This next picture is the beginning of the template. The two inside pieces are carefully machined to the length of the plate. For the other dimension (width of the plate) I just slid them together until they contacted the plate, which is sitting in between them. Notice my radiused corner pieces sitting near the corners (which I will insert later):



So now, how to join the parts of the template? Hmmmm, how about… MORE BISCUITS!

Ok, now I know what you are thinking. But I actually saw this in a magazine article so it is legit! I used tape to temporarily hold the joints together and then I made the biscuit slot across both pieces.



Then after I glue in the biscuits I will cut the extra half off and sand the whole thing.





Here is the fully glued up template. Notice the 1 1/2 radius corner pieces which I glued in place:



The corner pieces up close:



So when the glue sets up the next step will be to cut off the biscuit excess and sand the whole thing. I will need to especially sand the insides of the rounded corners because I left it a little tight on purpose. I will test the accuracy of the template on another piece of plywood. I will rout out the opening and see how tight the plate fits. Then if I need to do more sanding I can. Once it is the perfect size I will rout the real thing. Wish me luck.
 
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