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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That picture is sort of a tradition I have with all the machines I've restored.. an 'exploded' shot showing all the parts involved. There are actually a couple of parts missing in the shot.. see if you can figure out which ones :)

This particular machine was purchased a couple of years ago in running, but horrible cosmetic shape and in need of some serious help. Fortunately, I have another one that is in more or less pristine condition, so I wasn't in any real hurry to get this one done. I'm out of town at the moment, but will try to post a 'before' shot when I get back home. It's about half way reassembled right now, and I hope to get it completed within the next couple of weeks.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Russell, there were 8 bearings replaced (2 in the motor, 2 in the gear box, 2 on the jointer cutterhead and 2 on the planer cutterhead).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wondered what grease you use/recommend for the gearbox.

I just used some regular wheel bearing grease I had in the garage.. don't think it's all that critical since those gears don't turn very fast. The stuff that was in there when I took it apart had basically turned into wax and the gears were still in great shape.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Thanks Brad. I found the same waxy gunk in mine. Sat in a barn for 15 years. Rust galore, but I got it for free and have plenty of time on my hands. My explosion is before the cleaning process - which I'm now in the middle of. So far, everything looks pretty good. Plane bearings in great shape. Rollers too, but won't really know about them till I run it. Hope yours is up and running smoothly now. Thanks again.

Ken
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I had completely forgot about this thread and saying I'd post a before shot… whoops. I was scrolling through some of my pictures the other night and remembered that I never did… so as the saying goes, I guess it's better late than never. This particular machine was missing it's serial number badge, so I can't say for sure when it was made… but based on changes and other hints, I'm guessing it's probably a mid 70's model. As mentioned, it was in pretty rough shape when I got it… it was rusty, missing some parts and the feed rollers were completely shot:

Wood Wheel Flooring Gas Hardwood


It was completely disassembled, and every last part got some kind of attention. According to the parts diagram (and experience), there are a LOT of parts in one of these machines, as can be seen in the exploded shot above. It took almost three years of on and off again work to get it cleaned and back together. I wasn't in any real hurry since I had another 2030 that was in perfect condition, so I just took my time and messed with it when I had some spare moments. It also had to compete with a couple other machines I was restoring over that time period. In the end though, it turned out pretty nice:

Cabinetry Yellow Wood Floor Fixture


Here is a before and after from the other side:

Wood Gas Machine Hardwood Metal

Wheel Wood Motor vehicle Gas Automotive exterior


The hardest part was getting the base off… it was pretty rusted in place and took months of soaking with penetrating oil, a propane torch, rubber mallet and a hydraulic jack to finally get it off:

Wood Gas Flooring Hardwood Metal


There were a couple of parts that can't be replaced… such as the cutter head guard and the bellows around the table support posts. I should be able to make the guard, and I basically gave up on trying to find the bellows. It's also missing the table height hand wheel, but I'll make a nice custom wood one for it on the lathe that should be better than the original plastic thing that was on there.

I've run a few test pieces through it and it works like new. The knives could use a sharpening, but even as they are, the pieces came out nice and smooth. Once I finish up with the last remaining details (who knows when that will be!), I'll probably post it out on CL since I really don't have any need for two of these machines :)

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Hey Brad,

I picked up a 2030 for $30 but it doesnt have the motor or the pulley that goes on the motor..

Can you tell me what the diameter of the motor pulley is? As far as the motor goes is that a 1 hp motor with a max rpm of 3200?

Trying to back into the pulley dimension and the motor speed is a bit of a pain and i would rather it not really explode when i hit the switch..

Thanks
Jeff
 

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The motor is a universal (brush type) motor that is custom made to mount on the machine:

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bumper Fender Automotive exterior


I would have to partially disassemble things to get to the pulley for measurement, but it's not very big - maybe an inch and a half or so:

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood Bumper Wood


The cutter head pulley is somewhere around 2.5" in diameter, and the specs for the machine claim it runs at 7000 rpm. I have no idea what speed the motor runs at, but a fairly typical speed of around 11,000 rpm would run the head at roughly 6,600 rpm (assuming a 1.5/2.5" pulley combo), which is pretty close.

Unless you can find a direct replacement, you will most likely need to find an alternative way to mount a motor. You can verify the cutter head pulley diameter and use that to calculate the size of the drive pulley needed, depending on what motor you wind up putting on there (handy calculator can be found here). For example, a typical 3600 rpm (3450) induction motor with a 5" pulley would run the cutter head at ~6,900 rpm (based on a 2.5" pulley up top). An induction motor will make it a LOT quieter as well :)

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Perfect. Thanks for the info Brad.. 7000 rpm is what I thought I saw somewhere. I'll get the bolt pattern off the machine tonight and find something that will work. Cant get the original pulley for the motor anywhere so i may as well get one that works with the motor i will pick up.

Thanks
Jeff
 

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You may be able to use a narrower pulley and belt provided you can get something with the right spacing between the ribs. You could also make (or have made) an adapter that will allow the installation of a NEMA frame induction motor. I have seen such an adaptation made on a Hitachi resaw originally powered by a proprietary universal motor switched to a ~5hp induction motor.
 

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Hitachi or Ryobi (not sure they ever made a larger combo machine like that)?
 
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