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Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
 

· Registered
Joined
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273 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
What a great post! Welcome to the LumberJocks community…I look forward to reading more about your woodworking journey. I couldn't agree more with what you said about not changing anything in your past, although sometimes I do speculate about my own, "what if?" moments.
 

· Registered
Joined
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245 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
Welcome, one thing I can say about this site, IT IS ADDICTIVE!!!!!!!!!!
 

· Registered
Joined
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614 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
Sheila,

Welcome and hope you become a regular. There is some good scroll work presented at this site and some impressive Intarsia.

Inlay is a current popular theme on LJ right now. Maybe you could add some insights to a merger between scroll and inlay.

Steve.

BTW - Does Steve Good ever sleep? For a one person blog he is into everything.
 

· Registered
Joined
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19,715 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
Thank your for your most informative blog.
Welcome to Ljs
 

· Registered
Joined
·
544 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
What a pleasure it is to have you as a part of our community, Welcome to LJ's….... and as said before, it truly is Addictive

Look forward to seeing more posts from you!
 

· Registered
Joined
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7,027 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
welcome onbord this crazy addictive ship where everyone and all is very freindly
and whilling to share all what they know with you if you have any question
or struggel with some woodworking
enjoy and have fun Sheila

Dennis
 

· Registered
Joined
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3,537 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
Your'e a great and wise young lady God bless.Alistair
 

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739 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
Hey Sheila, that was a great post! I can identify with so much of what you said. Wish I can express myself like that! At least I make good sawdust! Greetings to you from the bottom end of Africa and look forward to more postings.
 

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1,456 Posts
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
I just bought my first "real" scrollsaw. It won't be arriving until the end of the month so I have decided to spend the next two weeks learning all I can on the subject. You're one of the experts here on LJ and I figure that If I can absorb 120 posts a day I can be caught up on your blog before the saw arrives!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Beginning this Blog

I recently was referred to this site by Steve Good, who has a wonderful, comprehensive scroll saw forum and blog page. Although I have been doing woodworking for almost fifteen years, I have finally reached a point in my life where I am able to make it the main focus of my activities. Since my life revolves around my woodworking and business, I believe that this blog will reflect that very clearly, although it will also be somewhat personal. But I think that woodworking is very personal anyway.

It has been a long journey to get to this point. There have been many good times and some not-so-good ones, but I appreciate every single step because I think that if even one thing was different, I would not be where I am today or who I am inside. It isn't only the positive events in our lives that make us what we are. Many times it is the negative things that mold and shape us and teach us to look at things in a certain way. I try to remember that when things are tough and move ahead.

I have learned that there is only one thing we can be certain of in life: change. Whether things are good or bad, we need to hold on and appreciate the moment, as we can be certain that things will be different before long. This helps us to not only appreciate the good days and things we have now, but also hang on when things are not so good, as we know that they will be different soon. I like this philosophy.

I liked reading about the new contest offered by this site in the newsletter. Fluidity. It is a perfect theme for projects because our existence itself is fluid. I am anxious to see what interpretations are going to be, as I am sure everyone else is. It will be an adventure for all of us for sure.

So why am I starting this blog? The other day I received a call from a customer who had a question for me. He kept saying how surprised he was that I answered my own phone. I have worked as a Contributing Editor for Creative Woodworks and Crafts Magazine for the past 13+ years and I guess in the scroll saw community, many people have heard of me. It seemed so odd to me that he would think I would have a secretary or staff. We kind of laughed about it, but it really got me thinking about his interpretation of my life. We all tend to form opinions of others from very limited information. We see the outside of a person as they are presented to us and many times are very quick to categorize that person in our minds. I do it myself.

But in my years of talking with and dealing with many people from many different places, I have come to realize that people are like icebergs. We only see the tip of them and below the surface is a vast, complex side of them that is the basis of their actions and thinking.

Everyone has a story. Everyone has traveled a journey. No two people have traveled identical paths. Thus, we are all unique in our thoughts, actions and creative processes. I enjoy hearing others stories. I think that listening to others and hearing their experiences helps us to understand each other. With that understanding, we learn.

I have used the phrase "Knowledge Is Power" in my signature since I have been on the web. Once someone told me that they thought it was quite arrogant of me to say that. He thought that I was implying that I knew more than anyone else and he found that offensive. I told him he couldn't be more wrong. My interpretation of the phrase is that our QUEST for knowledge EMPOWERS us to make better decisions about things in our lives. We are never finished learning. I learn every single day from my friends, colleagues, fellow woodworkers and students. We never know when we will learn something new. Sometimes you can learn from even a seemingly insignificant event. I feel the key is that we need to be open to learning.

Everyone has a story.

So I will close today with those thoughts. I don't know how often I will post here, but I hope to make it a habit. I don't know if anyone will even read this, but somehow it doesn't matter. Writing is a key in self-awareness. By writing things down we categorize our actions and it helps (me anyway) to keep my life organized. Organization leads to peace as far as I am concerned.

I am quite overwhelmed with the scope of the site here. I am still getting my footings and lurking around. I think for the first several days or maybe even weeks I will be more of a passive observer while I find my comfortable position among the others here. I want to upload the new things I am working on here. Like everyone else, I am anxious to see the response they get. I love seeing others projects and could spend my days just looking.

Although it is quite intimidating, the forum looks like it is full of friendly, knowledgeable and wonderfully creative people.

I think I am going to like it here.
LOL JOE! When I saw someone commented on post #1 I was curious as to why someone would go back so far. Heck - I don't remember that far back! Thank you for your ambitious following! I hope you find some good and useful information. :)

Take care, Sheila
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
 

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The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
it´s a beautyfull dish Sheila

Dennis
 

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The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
The scrollwork is quite impressive! I really like this pattern, it's quite elegant and regal.

IF, you were to add a motif in the center plate area, maybe a very small and simple design that reflects the outer design, nothing too busy. Otherwise it's beautiful as is. To make it more 3-D, you could sand the edges of the design a bit to round out the sharp edges, giving a more carved effect, but I realize what tedious work this would be. Again, it's beautifully done!
 

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The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
Wow that is an amazing pattern and great work.
 

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The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
This is a very nice pattern. The soft edges and recessed tray give it a 3D quality that I really like. Nice one!
 

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457 Posts
The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
Looks great!
 

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The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
Exquisite detail and design. Beautifully done. Thanks for posting.

God Bless
tom
 

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Joined
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2,583 Posts
The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
It looks nice. Did you make the plate itself or just do the scroll and finish work?
 

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Joined
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6,940 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The maple dresser tray

First of all, I want to thank you for all your positive responses. I was able to look at some of the work and it was so impressive! I am trying to put faces with comments and projects so I can get to know everyone well, but as my brain gets older, it somehow takes me longer to associate one with the other. I get so embarrassed when I don't remember someone. But there has been a lot of water under this bridge and after not traveling and living in the same place for the first thirty something years of my life, it seems that the last twenty years were filled with the adventures of three lifetimes.

I had a customer contact me last week who saw me from either Facebook or Steve's forum and asked me if I remembered him because he made the gymnast pattern for me. I truly tried, but I honestly couldn't remember who he was or associate him with any project. Did that ever happen to you?

First of all, I used to do gymnastics as a teen and I never remember anything about either making or seeing any type of gymnast pattern. Secondly, I have been doing my own designs from the get-go and I can't remember ever asking anyone to make a design for me. I am just not that kind of girl. I would have at least attempted to do it for myself if the need were there and I think I would have certainly remembered how I would have theoretically struggled to accomplish such a task. I am not one to ask for help when I know darn well I am capable of doing it myself.

Now I know I am approaching the half-century mark in my life and my memory isn't what is used to be (we all say that - but was our memory ever THAT good in the first place?) but for the life of me there isn't even a dim recollection of any sorts of this. It took up way too much of my thinking process for the day trying to remember, so after a while, I did what most humans would do: I convinced myself that he had me mixed up with someone else and that in reality, HE was the one that was mistaken! Now, of course I didn't call him on this. I politely told him that I didn't really remember specifically but I did have a vague recollection of the pattern. By saying this, I would not only save face and not look like an idiot to him, but I was also hoping he would elaborate on "my" design and pony up some additional information so that my brain cells would reconnect and I would be able to remember.

But alas, it wasn't to be.

So I sit here, still in the dark, wondering if that gymnast pattern I designed for him wasn't the greatest pattern ever made by a designer since scroll saws were invented. Of course it was! Silly me, I just forgot about it. I just came so easy to me that it got lost in the sea of patterns that I have made over the past years and filed under the 'all in a day's work' category. So (I convinced myself) if I could make THAT GOOD of a pattern and not even remember it, just think of the wonderful things I can make now! Boy, it was like lighting a match to a rocket. It sure is strange where we find our inspiration from, isn't it? Hey, whatever works for you. :)

And now back to reality . . . .

I had a good day yesterday. I had been working on a design for a couple of days for a small tray to set on your dresser to throw your keys and loose change in. I wanted to do some classic fretwork, and came up with this design that to me resembled Batten burg lace. I drew it a couple of days ago, but I had the task of writing instructions for the six or so new projects that I had finished in the previous weeks. (Writing instructions ranks just above doing the accounting in the list of things I need to do regularly for my business - and that is probably at the bottom of the list). This design looked good on paper, and I couldn't wait to cut it out and watch it come to life. So on Wednesday, I started cutting it.

I was right in the middle of sawing when 'zap' the electricity went out. It seemed my landlord forgot to tell me she was having the circuits worked on for the day. The scope of having no electricity is very far reaching in my life. I had no computer, no phone, no tv, no music, no stove, no clock and NO SCROLL SAW. For the first hour, I did some house cleaning. After all it was light out and that was OK. But once that was all finished, I paced around here like a tiger in a cage. I tried to read, but most of the magazines I had were about scroll sawing and I had read them before. This only fueled my need to cut. I looked at my half-finished project longingly and I even peeled half of the pattern off where I had already cut, daydreaming on how it would look when finished. Eventually, I did something that I very rarely do in the afternoon - I took a nap. If anything it helped to pass that time of anguish for me, as I am terrible at 'doing nothing'. By about five-thirty they were done, but then my window of opportunity had passed, as I had dinner and other thing to tend to. So I waited to be fresh the following day.

I finished cutting it yesterday. I was glad I waited. If I learned anything in the years I have been doing woodworking it is that you don't do something tedious when you are tired if you don't have to. So far, my cutting was pretty good on this and I didn't want to blow it now. So as difficult as it was, I waited until I was fresh the next day to finish. Sometimes we have to be mature about these things for the greater good of the project.

I finished about 1pm in the afternoon and I was really pleased with the pattern. I had bevel cut the center of the circle so that the bottom of the 'tray' would push through a bit and the scroll sawn rim would sit up a little. Before I did the inside fret cuts, I routed both the inside edge and the outside edge with a round over bit to soften the shape. The resulting edges are very delicate looking and flow very nicely. I am very pleased.

I was fighting with whether or not I should put some kind of design in the center, but as soon as I peeled off the entire pattern, I was also glad I didn't. Sometimes simple is the best. The wood I chose for this tray was a piece of bird's eye maple and I felt the wood itself should be the focus.

In the old days, I would have pulled out the can of poly urethane and sprayed away and called it a day. The project would have been quite pretty, and adequately finished. But after looking at the portfolios of others both here and on my Facebook and other list, I realize that there are much higher levels that can be reached. (Remember I said I wanted to fit in?) So I sat down and put on a couple of shows and began hand-sanding. First with 120 grit to get the remaining planer marks off the surface, then to 220 grit (wow, this really looking nice!) Then I went to 320 grit and you could begin to see the 'shine' and layers of grain through the wood. It almost had curly undertones and they almost looked metallic. Finally, I got out the 600 grit paper and gave it a good polish. It was beautiful!

I decided somewhere in the process that I would use mineral oil to finish it. I had used that once on a walnut cracker basket and after several days of coating and re-coating, it sits there on my counter with the beautiful warm luster of the walnut glowing. I made that basket almost two years ago, and even though I realize it will be due for a touch-up soon, it still has that warm, beautiful glow.

So mineral oil it was. I applied a healthy coat using an 1/2" paint brush inside the fret cuts. This, of course absorbed like a sponge and I realize that I will not be able to buff it, so I gave it as much as it would take. I then used a soft cloth to work the oil into the surface, taking my time and really pushing it into the pores. After two coats like this, I dipped a small clean piece of 600 grit paper into the oil and wet sanded the oil into the pores. All in all I spent about 2-3 hours. It was a labor of love however, and the results is just what this piece of maple deserves. It has a warm, rich, satiny glow and the grain is beautiful. Although it is one of the simpler pieces I made, I am very, very proud of it.

I think I am going to finish it off with some paste wax, but I need to see what is available here in my area. I haven't really used that as a final finish before so it is new territory for me. Any suggestions would be helpful. :)

I am going to try to attach pictures to the post, but if it doesn't work, I will put them in my profile pictures. It was rainy yesterday and I had very little natural light to photograph it, but I will try again today, even though it is overcast. As always, the pictures just don't do it justice.

Thank you all for the inspiration. After seeing so much beautiful work done by everyone, I want to climb to a higher level. I hope you like the dish.

Sheila

!(Maple Dresser Tray)!
It started out a board. I drew the pattern and bevel cut the center 3 degrees so that the inside is recessed. I drew the fretwork design myself and did all the cutting, routing and finishing. The depth of the drop in the center depends on the thickness of the wood and also the degree you angle your saw when cutting the inner circle. :)

Thanks so much, Sheila
 
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