LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
1 - 20 of 46 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Thanks. I swear I am not a hoarder! :)
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
"Can't remember painting my tool cabinets red!"

@Kiwi - That's the way it came from Harbor Freight.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Worked out in the shop today. The high for today set an all time record for the Houston area - 36 degrees F. We knew that the tail end of the arctic blast was coming, so we were ready for it.

Working in a small area has it's drawbacks, and many times I wish the place was larger, but it isn't and it is not going to get any larger. But being insulated and air conditioned/heated does help make up for the size limitation.

It has been 72 deg F in the shop all day - T shirt weather! :) For you guys north of here, I don't envy you one bit. It is hard for me to imagine the temps being reported on the news.

Temperature Gadget Measuring instrument Display device Gas
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
Thanks grandpa. They are square, level, and screwed together. The face frame should make them look like one cabinet.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
I couldn't stand the mess any longer. Today, I cleaned off the metal shelving unit, posted a picture of it on FaceBook, and found someone to take it. Turns out, it was my wife's nephew. His girlfriend has potted plants and this stand will work great for them. I have had this stand for almost thirty years. :)

Before:
Wood Shelving Shelf Gas Ladder


With the stand removed and the area cleaned up, I proceeded to attach a couple of pieces of 1/2 inch plywood to the wall. And I mounted a shelf that I had used previously. It has a power bar. That should come in handy.

One of the reasons I wanted this wall space, is to store my pocket hole jig and the table saw sled.
I screwed on a bracket of the pocket hole jig/sled to rest on and added a lip of 1/2 inch plywood. To keep it from falling, I fabricated two catches to hold the sled in place.

Then I mounted a shaker peg on the plywood so the table saw sled would have a place to hang. There was already a hole in the sled, so this worked nicely.

Lastly, I added a separate piece of plywood with another shaker peg so my table saw auxiliary fence would have a place to hang. When all was said and done, my HVLP sprayer sits underneath nicely.

Finding a place to hang these pieces of equipment helped clear the floor of stuff that constantly gets in the way.

After:
Here is the after pic with everything in it's place. Feeling pretty happy tonight.
Wood Gas Shelving Building Household supply
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
New Cabinets Over the Tool Box

To prepare for the next phase of the makeover, I demoed the old work bench that has served me well for the last 20+ years. Fortunately, it was built with drywall screws and came apart easily. I only had to pull the 6 nails that I used to fasten it to the wall. I called a friend and he came over and loaded it up. In a week or so, I'll go help him set it up in his garage.

I cleaned up the area and painted the part of the wall that I could get to. Then with a lot of pushing and pulling, I managed to move the toolbox down the wall to where I wanted it to sit. It is heavy and thank goodness the heavy duty casters worked great. Then I painted the wall that had been blocked by the toolbox.

The wall is starting to look pretty good. Fresh paint always helps! :) I have a blank canvas! :)
Property Wood Shade Building Wall


Part of my makeover plan is to build and install cabinets above the rolling toolbox. With the toolbox in place, I was ready to start building the two cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above it.

I bought a couple of sheets of Birch plywood from Clark's Hardwood Lumber Co. - a local lumber distributor. They have a lot of hardwood to chose from. The birch was $40/sheet which is as good as I can get in my area for 3/4 inch A/B plywood.

Here is a pic of my "plan". I had to make a couple of adjustments on the fly so take the dimensions with a grain of salt! :)
Wood Font Rectangle Handwriting Gas


Each cabinet has three components.

  • Each cabinet will have six compartments for storing plastic "tackle trays" which have everything from screws to bolts…and more. With 12 compartments, I can keep the most used trays within easy reach and have the others stored for use if needed.

  • Immediately above these compartments will be six compartments with 1/4 inch plywood dividers. These will be used to store drills/ drivers, nail guns, etc. Again, all within easy reach.

  • Above those compartments will be a storage area with shelf pins so shelves can be adjusted to whatever height I need. I am pretty stoked about this design. I think it is going to work out great.

Later I will build the face frames and add doors to the top portion.

So, let's get to cutting, routing, painting and get 'em put together.
Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Bumper


I'd like to mention here that to break down the plywood sheets, I used a track saw that I bought recently with this project in mind. It is the CS55 model made by Scheppach. It looks identical to the Grizzly model in every way. I also bought the 55 inch track from Grizzly to give me over 100 inches of saw capability. All parts fit like they came out of the same box. :) So far, I haven't had any problems with the saw or track pieces and I am getting more comfortable with the saw with each use.

Here are the two sides of the first cabinet with my layout lines marked for routing. I have an exact width dado jig made similar to the one The Wood Whisperer built. Thanks for the inspiration, Marc. I used a 1/2 inch flush trim bit to cut the 3/4 inch and the 1/2 inch dadoes. For the 1/4 inch dadoes, I switched to a guide bushing and used a 3/16 router bit made specifically for undersize plywood. I took a lot of time to layout where the dadoes needed to go, and fortunately for me, all worked out perfect. I guess I was just lucky.

Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring Automotive exterior


After drilling the shelf pin holes, I was ready to paint and assemble it.
Here it is ready to hang. Touch up painting will come later.
Shelving Wood Building Shade Flooring


Here is the cabinet hanging on the wall before I moved the toolbox.
Rectangle Shelving Wood Facade Tints and shades


Trial fit with some of my tools and tackle trays.
Rectangle Shelving Gas Tints and shades Machine


Close up!
Shelving Bottle Gas Facade Machine


This pic is after I relocated the toolbox.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


Cabinetry Shelving Wood Rectangle Gas


When my friend came over, he helped me scoot the cabinet over a couple of inches so it is now in the right spot.

Next up is some electrical mods. I am going to put in a couple of receptacles connected with 1/2 inch EMT conduit.

Stay tuned. more coming soon.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
New Cabinets Over the Tool Box

To prepare for the next phase of the makeover, I demoed the old work bench that has served me well for the last 20+ years. Fortunately, it was built with drywall screws and came apart easily. I only had to pull the 6 nails that I used to fasten it to the wall. I called a friend and he came over and loaded it up. In a week or so, I'll go help him set it up in his garage.

I cleaned up the area and painted the part of the wall that I could get to. Then with a lot of pushing and pulling, I managed to move the toolbox down the wall to where I wanted it to sit. It is heavy and thank goodness the heavy duty casters worked great. Then I painted the wall that had been blocked by the toolbox.

The wall is starting to look pretty good. Fresh paint always helps! :) I have a blank canvas! :)
Property Wood Shade Building Wall


Part of my makeover plan is to build and install cabinets above the rolling toolbox. With the toolbox in place, I was ready to start building the two cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above it.

I bought a couple of sheets of Birch plywood from Clark's Hardwood Lumber Co. - a local lumber distributor. They have a lot of hardwood to chose from. The birch was $40/sheet which is as good as I can get in my area for 3/4 inch A/B plywood.

Here is a pic of my "plan". I had to make a couple of adjustments on the fly so take the dimensions with a grain of salt! :)
Wood Font Rectangle Handwriting Gas


Each cabinet has three components.

  • Each cabinet will have six compartments for storing plastic "tackle trays" which have everything from screws to bolts…and more. With 12 compartments, I can keep the most used trays within easy reach and have the others stored for use if needed.

  • Immediately above these compartments will be six compartments with 1/4 inch plywood dividers. These will be used to store drills/ drivers, nail guns, etc. Again, all within easy reach.

  • Above those compartments will be a storage area with shelf pins so shelves can be adjusted to whatever height I need. I am pretty stoked about this design. I think it is going to work out great.

Later I will build the face frames and add doors to the top portion.

So, let's get to cutting, routing, painting and get 'em put together.
Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Bumper


I'd like to mention here that to break down the plywood sheets, I used a track saw that I bought recently with this project in mind. It is the CS55 model made by Scheppach. It looks identical to the Grizzly model in every way. I also bought the 55 inch track from Grizzly to give me over 100 inches of saw capability. All parts fit like they came out of the same box. :) So far, I haven't had any problems with the saw or track pieces and I am getting more comfortable with the saw with each use.

Here are the two sides of the first cabinet with my layout lines marked for routing. I have an exact width dado jig made similar to the one The Wood Whisperer built. Thanks for the inspiration, Marc. I used a 1/2 inch flush trim bit to cut the 3/4 inch and the 1/2 inch dadoes. For the 1/4 inch dadoes, I switched to a guide bushing and used a 3/16 router bit made specifically for undersize plywood. I took a lot of time to layout where the dadoes needed to go, and fortunately for me, all worked out perfect. I guess I was just lucky.

Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring Automotive exterior


After drilling the shelf pin holes, I was ready to paint and assemble it.
Here it is ready to hang. Touch up painting will come later.
Shelving Wood Building Shade Flooring


Here is the cabinet hanging on the wall before I moved the toolbox.
Rectangle Shelving Wood Facade Tints and shades


Trial fit with some of my tools and tackle trays.
Rectangle Shelving Gas Tints and shades Machine


Close up!
Shelving Bottle Gas Facade Machine


This pic is after I relocated the toolbox.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


Cabinetry Shelving Wood Rectangle Gas


When my friend came over, he helped me scoot the cabinet over a couple of inches so it is now in the right spot.

Next up is some electrical mods. I am going to put in a couple of receptacles connected with 1/2 inch EMT conduit.

Stay tuned. more coming soon.
@Luke. I put a spacer on the back of the cabinet across the bottom so the shelf sits perpendicular on the cleat. Each cabinet has three 4 inch "backs", one at the top, bottom and one just above the shelf above the cubbie holes. Lots of pocket screws and strong as heck.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
New Cabinets Over the Tool Box

To prepare for the next phase of the makeover, I demoed the old work bench that has served me well for the last 20+ years. Fortunately, it was built with drywall screws and came apart easily. I only had to pull the 6 nails that I used to fasten it to the wall. I called a friend and he came over and loaded it up. In a week or so, I'll go help him set it up in his garage.

I cleaned up the area and painted the part of the wall that I could get to. Then with a lot of pushing and pulling, I managed to move the toolbox down the wall to where I wanted it to sit. It is heavy and thank goodness the heavy duty casters worked great. Then I painted the wall that had been blocked by the toolbox.

The wall is starting to look pretty good. Fresh paint always helps! :) I have a blank canvas! :)
Property Wood Shade Building Wall


Part of my makeover plan is to build and install cabinets above the rolling toolbox. With the toolbox in place, I was ready to start building the two cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above it.

I bought a couple of sheets of Birch plywood from Clark's Hardwood Lumber Co. - a local lumber distributor. They have a lot of hardwood to chose from. The birch was $40/sheet which is as good as I can get in my area for 3/4 inch A/B plywood.

Here is a pic of my "plan". I had to make a couple of adjustments on the fly so take the dimensions with a grain of salt! :)
Wood Font Rectangle Handwriting Gas


Each cabinet has three components.

  • Each cabinet will have six compartments for storing plastic "tackle trays" which have everything from screws to bolts…and more. With 12 compartments, I can keep the most used trays within easy reach and have the others stored for use if needed.

  • Immediately above these compartments will be six compartments with 1/4 inch plywood dividers. These will be used to store drills/ drivers, nail guns, etc. Again, all within easy reach.

  • Above those compartments will be a storage area with shelf pins so shelves can be adjusted to whatever height I need. I am pretty stoked about this design. I think it is going to work out great.

Later I will build the face frames and add doors to the top portion.

So, let's get to cutting, routing, painting and get 'em put together.
Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Bumper


I'd like to mention here that to break down the plywood sheets, I used a track saw that I bought recently with this project in mind. It is the CS55 model made by Scheppach. It looks identical to the Grizzly model in every way. I also bought the 55 inch track from Grizzly to give me over 100 inches of saw capability. All parts fit like they came out of the same box. :) So far, I haven't had any problems with the saw or track pieces and I am getting more comfortable with the saw with each use.

Here are the two sides of the first cabinet with my layout lines marked for routing. I have an exact width dado jig made similar to the one The Wood Whisperer built. Thanks for the inspiration, Marc. I used a 1/2 inch flush trim bit to cut the 3/4 inch and the 1/2 inch dadoes. For the 1/4 inch dadoes, I switched to a guide bushing and used a 3/16 router bit made specifically for undersize plywood. I took a lot of time to layout where the dadoes needed to go, and fortunately for me, all worked out perfect. I guess I was just lucky.

Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring Automotive exterior


After drilling the shelf pin holes, I was ready to paint and assemble it.
Here it is ready to hang. Touch up painting will come later.
Shelving Wood Building Shade Flooring


Here is the cabinet hanging on the wall before I moved the toolbox.
Rectangle Shelving Wood Facade Tints and shades


Trial fit with some of my tools and tackle trays.
Rectangle Shelving Gas Tints and shades Machine


Close up!
Shelving Bottle Gas Facade Machine


This pic is after I relocated the toolbox.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


Cabinetry Shelving Wood Rectangle Gas


When my friend came over, he helped me scoot the cabinet over a couple of inches so it is now in the right spot.

Next up is some electrical mods. I am going to put in a couple of receptacles connected with 1/2 inch EMT conduit.

Stay tuned. more coming soon.
Thanks Mark. I sorta switched hobbies. :) I retired from shooting high school sports, sold a few pieces of camera gear and bought some woodworking tools.

The shop cabinets are working great. Almost everything I need is in one of those plastic tackle boxes. Very easy to grab and go.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Adding new receptacles

With my tool box where I want it to be from now on, and one cabinet set in place, it was time to modify my electrical receptacle. I have been using this single receptacle with a 6 outlet adapter for 20 years. It is time for a makeover!

First thing I did was determine which breaker fed the existing receptacle. That only took two tries! :) I even used a Klein circuit breaker finder but it didn't do as good a job as I expected. But I managed to isolate the power. Since I am the only one here this week, I was good to go.

If you look closely at this picture, you can see the existing receptacle.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


A trip to my local big box store provided a few things I needed to go along with the supplies I had on hand.

I removed the existing receptacle box and mounted a conduit box a little to the right and a little lower on the wall so the conduit would run easily beneath the cabinets. It is attached firmly to the wall stud.

After re-routing the romex through a plastic bushing into the box, I closed up the old hole in the sheetrock and patched it up with drywall mud. After it was painted, it simply disappeared.

I decided to put only one receptacle in this particular box so I would have room to tie in the wires. That turned out to be a good move on my part.
Arthropod Fluid Liquid Spider Insect


After some careful measurements, I cut the 1/2 inch EMT tubing and installed two more boxes. Each is mounted to a wall stud.
Gas Wall socket Audio equipment Electronic device Machine


Don't let the camera angle fool ya, everything is level, at least it is according to my 4 foot level. :)
Floor Gas Flooring Electrical wiring Audio equipment


Time to close it up.
Gas Composite material Electrical wiring Machine Wire


After some touch up painting, the wall looks like new.
Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Automotive tail & brake light Bumper


Hurray! My mods passed the smoke test! :)
Tire Bumper Automotive tire Automotive exterior Vehicle


This brings me up to date. I have my work bench cleared and ready to assemble cabinet number two.
Stay tuned.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Adding new receptacles

With my tool box where I want it to be from now on, and one cabinet set in place, it was time to modify my electrical receptacle. I have been using this single receptacle with a 6 outlet adapter for 20 years. It is time for a makeover!

First thing I did was determine which breaker fed the existing receptacle. That only took two tries! :) I even used a Klein circuit breaker finder but it didn't do as good a job as I expected. But I managed to isolate the power. Since I am the only one here this week, I was good to go.

If you look closely at this picture, you can see the existing receptacle.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


A trip to my local big box store provided a few things I needed to go along with the supplies I had on hand.

I removed the existing receptacle box and mounted a conduit box a little to the right and a little lower on the wall so the conduit would run easily beneath the cabinets. It is attached firmly to the wall stud.

After re-routing the romex through a plastic bushing into the box, I closed up the old hole in the sheetrock and patched it up with drywall mud. After it was painted, it simply disappeared.

I decided to put only one receptacle in this particular box so I would have room to tie in the wires. That turned out to be a good move on my part.
Arthropod Fluid Liquid Spider Insect


After some careful measurements, I cut the 1/2 inch EMT tubing and installed two more boxes. Each is mounted to a wall stud.
Gas Wall socket Audio equipment Electronic device Machine


Don't let the camera angle fool ya, everything is level, at least it is according to my 4 foot level. :)
Floor Gas Flooring Electrical wiring Audio equipment


Time to close it up.
Gas Composite material Electrical wiring Machine Wire


After some touch up painting, the wall looks like new.
Hood Automotive lighting Automotive tire Automotive tail & brake light Bumper


Hurray! My mods passed the smoke test! :)
Tire Bumper Automotive tire Automotive exterior Vehicle


This brings me up to date. I have my work bench cleared and ready to assemble cabinet number two.
Stay tuned.
Thanks for the tip Jim.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Wall Cabinet #2 Build

Today proved to be productive even if it did take all day! :-(

I had all the pieces for the second cabinet except for one and I had to cut some dadoes in another. These were the cut to fit parts of the tray cubbies and the tool cubbies.

I won't bore you with pics of the front since they are the same as the first one I built.

Here is the cabinet from the back side.
Property Wood Architecture Rectangle Wall


This pic shows the French cleat and bottom spacer attached.

Building Wood Floor Gas Engineering


Close up of the cleat.
Wood Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades Rectangle


And the spacer.
Wood Rectangle Hardwood Plywood Composite material


Gotta love it when a plan comes together. Just like I drew it up! :)
Shelving Automotive design Gas Machine Engineering


Dead level! :) Check out the bubble on the back of the drill. :)
Light Yellow Gas Paint Machine


Shelves temporarily set in place to make sure they fit. Of course they fit, I cut them to fit. :)
Building Shelf Shelving Automotive design Gas


Looks like it is time to build some face frames. I bought some poplar at the lumber yard that was discounted 50%. Perfect sizes for the frames.

I am feeling really satisfied with the outcome so far.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Touch up painting and pegboard

Over this past weekend, I finished trimming out the cabinets that were built for the cubbie hole. The way I applied the trim, the cabinets now look like one. I can't image anyone wanting to take them down in the future.

Shelf Shelving Kitchen appliance Building Refrigerator


Also, when I demoed the old work bench I took the existing pegboard down from the wall. I found a new home for it! It is now residing on a portion of the wall that is adjacent to a door. It has never been used because there is only a few inches of useable space. I now have a new home for some of my templates, track saw tracks and the pocket hole jig. It is working out nicely with no interference when opening the door.

Interior design Wood Flooring Floor Wall


Next up in this makeover is a new miter saw station. I am still thinking about it and sketching a few design options. I hope to get a good bang for my buck with room for storage in cabinets underneath the extension tables, shop vac beneath the saw, upper cabinets on the wall and possibly room for a couple of my sanders.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Touch up painting and pegboard

Over this past weekend, I finished trimming out the cabinets that were built for the cubbie hole. The way I applied the trim, the cabinets now look like one. I can't image anyone wanting to take them down in the future.

Shelf Shelving Kitchen appliance Building Refrigerator


Also, when I demoed the old work bench I took the existing pegboard down from the wall. I found a new home for it! It is now residing on a portion of the wall that is adjacent to a door. It has never been used because there is only a few inches of useable space. I now have a new home for some of my templates, track saw tracks and the pocket hole jig. It is working out nicely with no interference when opening the door.

Interior design Wood Flooring Floor Wall


Next up in this makeover is a new miter saw station. I am still thinking about it and sketching a few design options. I hope to get a good bang for my buck with room for storage in cabinets underneath the extension tables, shop vac beneath the saw, upper cabinets on the wall and possibly room for a couple of my sanders.
Thanks whitebeast88.

"Very nice. I'd like to read a review of your track saw system too."

Thanks Buckethead. I will be cutting some more plywood this week. So far, no problems with the saw or tracks. I would like to get a little more use and experience before writing up a review.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #41 ·
Touch up painting and pegboard

Over this past weekend, I finished trimming out the cabinets that were built for the cubbie hole. The way I applied the trim, the cabinets now look like one. I can't image anyone wanting to take them down in the future.

Shelf Shelving Kitchen appliance Building Refrigerator


Also, when I demoed the old work bench I took the existing pegboard down from the wall. I found a new home for it! It is now residing on a portion of the wall that is adjacent to a door. It has never been used because there is only a few inches of useable space. I now have a new home for some of my templates, track saw tracks and the pocket hole jig. It is working out nicely with no interference when opening the door.

Interior design Wood Flooring Floor Wall


Next up in this makeover is a new miter saw station. I am still thinking about it and sketching a few design options. I hope to get a good bang for my buck with room for storage in cabinets underneath the extension tables, shop vac beneath the saw, upper cabinets on the wall and possibly room for a couple of my sanders.
Thanks Bryan.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #43 ·
New Miter Saw Station

My next part of the garage makeover is to build a miter saw station. I bought the plans from Ron Paulk and studied them over and over and watched his videos on building his work bench. So, I finally used Mikey's Sketch pad to design my version of the miter saw station.

Here is my plan.

Rectangle Font Wood Gas Pattern


Sorry there is not a lot of detail in my plan but here is the jist of it.

  • Build two cabinets that will be used for storing power tools and larger jigs and leave room for short cut offs 24 inches or less. Use 3" locking casters on the front.
  • Add drawers or trays as necessary to make it easier to get to the tools such as the air compressor.
  • Position Shop Vac in the area under the miter saw.
  • Build the Ron Paulk version of The ultimate Miter Saw Station…with a few exceptions such as the width will be 24 inches instead of 18.
  • Attach the miter saw station to the cabinets with 3/8" bolts.
  • Build an extension table for the left side of the miter saw. Support it with Ron's saw horse as shown in his plans.

All of this planning sounds good except, I have made slight changes as I went along. Hopefully for the good. I am mainly using Ron's plans as a guide and to see his ideas of designing his bench and stand.

I have searched You Tube over and over watching videos until it all became a blur. However, I do like the ideas Jordan incorporated into his miter saw stand. I should also have room to set up my belt sander and maybe the oscillating sander. The more, the merrier.

Other inspiration came from the miter saw station built by Steve at downtoearthwoodworks.

Dust collection for this saw is #1 priority on my list. I already have the Shop Vac hooked up to it with the dust routed through the Oneida cyclone which works just great. I checked the vac and there is nothing but an empty bag in it. If I do set up a sander or two, I will most likely build some sort of short manifold so I can connect the tools to the Shop Vac also. That shouldn't be to hard.

But the main thing I want to do is build some sort of hood to catch the airborne dust and draw it downward into a port that will be routed to my Harbor Freight Dust collector. That is a work in progress. I think it is doable because there will be about 6 1/2 inches behind the miter saw station that I can use for plumbing. :)

Cabinet Construction
I have completed the carcases for the two cabinets. I used Birch plywood purchased from a lumber yard for $39.95 sheet. That is not too bad price wise.

Each cabinet has two sides and a center divider, along with a solid bottom. I connected these pieces with 4 inch stretchers also cut from the plywood and everything was joined together using pocket hole construction. Since I want these cabinets to be strong, I used some 1/2 inch plywood left over from another project to fill in the back of each cabinet. I used the Kreg micro pocket hole jig to drill the 1/2 inch pockets and one inch screws. That made the cabinet very strong.
Wood Automotive design Engineering Hardwood Automotive exterior


Cabinetry Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


I mounted some plywood pads under each corner of the cabinet to give the casters some extra meat so the lag screws will get a good grip.

Wood Gas Wood stain Hardwood Machine


And here we are, up to date. Both carcases are ready for drawers and face frames. I have them set in place and mocked up the saw, air compressor and the shop vac.
Engineering Motor vehicle Gas Wood Machine


After the initial dry fit, I realized that I probably should shorten the overall length a few inches and leave room for the dust deputy to sit at the end which will make it really easy to empty. So I think I will shorten the miter saw Station overall length to 80 inches instead of the original 90. After doing some preliminary measuring, I will be able to have about 8 1/2 inches of full support for whatever I will be cutting with about 37 inches to the right of the blade and about the same to the left. With a short extension, I will be able to support a full 8 feet to the left of the blade and still have the garage door down. To the right, I can go out over 12 feet with no problem.

That brings the project up to date. I think I will ponder the situation and maybe go to the store and check out the HVAC metal stuff. Hopefully, I will be able to fit in the duct work so I can rout it to the dust collector.

I forgot to mention that the miter saw is brand new. I sold my original Harbor Freight model and bought the Hitachi 12 slider from the Big Box Store. So far, I really like it. Smooth, not too loud and the factory blade works surprisingly well. The main reason for purchasing the saw new was to gain about three inches of wall clearance with the two position slider. Maybe I can do a review after I have had it for awhile and get used to it.
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
New Miter Saw Station - Construction Details

I have been working diligently trying to get this phase of the makeover finished.
Here are some pics of the construction.

Case work with drawer slides ready for drawers or trays.
Shelving Wood Rectangle Composite material Gas


Wood Gas Fixture Composite material Machine


Top of the cabinet. The miter saw portion will bolt on to the top of the two cabinets.
Wood Floor Flooring Composite material Gas


Laying out the templates for the sides and ends. Dang that MDF makes a lot of dust.
Wood Flooring Composite material Rectangle Gas


Rough cutting the openings so I can route 'em smooth using the template I cut from MDF.
Wood Saw Floor Flooring Drill


Two routers are better than one! Here I was routing the pieces for the sides and ends of the miter saw stand. When I finished routing a piece, I would use the other router to do a little round over to ease the sharp edges. Then I would move to the next piece and repeat.
Milling Wood Table Tool Machine tool


Time to drill a few pocket holes. Check out my air filtration unit in the background. Don't laugh, it works great.
Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Power tool


Dry fit. I cut the two tops for the stand and set the saw in place to see how it would fit.
Table Power tool Tool Machine Machine tool


More construction pics coming soon including the final assy and the installation of the Kreg Precision Trak. Rockler had a 20% off sale going so I couldn't pass up saving almost $25 on the Trak. :)
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
New Miter Saw Station - Construction Details

I have been working diligently trying to get this phase of the makeover finished.
Here are some pics of the construction.

Case work with drawer slides ready for drawers or trays.
Shelving Wood Rectangle Composite material Gas


Wood Gas Fixture Composite material Machine


Top of the cabinet. The miter saw portion will bolt on to the top of the two cabinets.
Wood Floor Flooring Composite material Gas


Laying out the templates for the sides and ends. Dang that MDF makes a lot of dust.
Wood Flooring Composite material Rectangle Gas


Rough cutting the openings so I can route 'em smooth using the template I cut from MDF.
Wood Saw Floor Flooring Drill


Two routers are better than one! Here I was routing the pieces for the sides and ends of the miter saw stand. When I finished routing a piece, I would use the other router to do a little round over to ease the sharp edges. Then I would move to the next piece and repeat.
Milling Wood Table Tool Machine tool


Time to drill a few pocket holes. Check out my air filtration unit in the background. Don't laugh, it works great.
Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Power tool


Dry fit. I cut the two tops for the stand and set the saw in place to see how it would fit.
Table Power tool Tool Machine Machine tool


More construction pics coming soon including the final assy and the installation of the Kreg Precision Trak. Rockler had a 20% off sale going so I couldn't pass up saving almost $25 on the Trak. :)
Here are a couple of pics of what will be discussed in the next segment. Just a tease.
Still installing the Kreg Trak. But the rest is good to go.

Saw Wood Table Machine Engineering


Wood Floor Shelving Table Flooring
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
2,392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Assemblying the Miter Saw Stand

As promised, here are some pics of the construction of the miter saw stand. If you remember from the first entry, I am using the plans from Ron Paulk to go by. However, I have made some changes to fit my situation. So this stand is kind of a cross between his workbench and his miter saw stand.

Onward and upward…

In my last entry, I made a couple of templates out of mdf to use when cutting and routing the parts for the stand. I forgot to include pics of them, so here are the pics of the templates after they had been fabricated.

To make them, I laid out the dimensions and cut a 5 inch hole on each end with a hole saw. Then I used a straight edge to mark in between the circles. I cut just inside the line with a jig saw, then attached the guides with double stick tape and ran the router along the edges with a flush trim bit attached. They actually turned out pretty good.

Wood Font Office supplies Sports equipment Engineering


Wood Rectangle Font Audio equipment Office supplies


With all of my parts cut, I started the assembly by building each side of the stand. I turned the top upside down and attached the front, back and side pieces with pocket screws. I used some glue but pretty much abandoned it after slicing my finger wide open when I was in a hurry (glue setting up) to drive the screws and literally drove the screw past my index finger on my left hand. Dang that hurt…and I bled like a stuck hog. First Aid to the rescue. Thank goodness for a caring wife.

I managed to get both pieces of the top together without further incident.

I sat them aside and concentrated on the base of the stand. It is a single piece of 3/4 plywood 80 inches long by 22 1/4 wide. I positioned it on top of the two lower cabinets and bolted it to them with 8ea 5/16 inch bolts.
Automotive tire Automotive exterior Bumper Gas Wood


Next, I glued and screwed the two frame stiffners to the bottom. I scrounged up some 2×4's to make some simple caulls.

Wood Table Desk Floor Flooring


I gave the glue about an hour and a half to dry then turned the bottom over and drove the rest of the screws.

Wood Floor Composite material Flooring Hardwood


With the bottom complete, I turned it over on top of the two top pieces and screwed through the bottom into the frame members of the two tops. I used a lot of drywall screws for this operation.

These pics show the stand completely assembled and bolted together.
Yep… it's dead level. Guess I lucked out this time.
Furniture Table Computer desk Wood Floor


Floor Gas Flooring Automotive exterior Computer desk


Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Door


Wood Window Bumper Automotive exterior Vehicle door


Wood Table Tool Table saws Gas


Gadget Gas Wood Audio equipment Composite material


Wood Automotive exterior Bumper Gas Wood stain


My next entry will cover the construction of the fences and the installation of the Kreg Precision Trak System.
 

Attachments

1 - 20 of 46 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top