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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
 

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· Registered
Joined
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535 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
I know the feeling, it all looks allot now but it's gonna be great
 

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· Registered
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209 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
I know where there is a shop that you could use as a trial run to see how it would go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Thanks. I swear I am not a hoarder! :)
 

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1,423 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Sounds like a good plan. It will be much appreciated when it is completed I am sure. Look forward to seeing some of the future posts regarding the undertaking.

CtL
 

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1,038 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
sounds great,can't wait to see your progress….
 

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· Registered
Joined
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779 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Love your drill press set-up.
You know what they say, "Organization is for people who are too lazy to look for things"........................
 

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· Registered
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1 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Can't remember painting my tool cabinets red! Great progress further on in your blog.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
"Can't remember painting my tool cabinets red!"

@Kiwi - That's the way it came from Harbor Freight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
Worked out in the shop today. The high for today set an all time record for the Houston area - 36 degrees F. We knew that the tail end of the arctic blast was coming, so we were ready for it.

Working in a small area has it's drawbacks, and many times I wish the place was larger, but it isn't and it is not going to get any larger. But being insulated and air conditioned/heated does help make up for the size limitation.

It has been 72 deg F in the shop all day - T shirt weather! :) For you guys north of here, I don't envy you one bit. It is hard for me to imagine the temps being reported on the news.

Temperature Gadget Measuring instrument Display device Gas
 

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What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
I've got a 1 car garage shop also..
and mine has junk everywhere just like these photos..

You've added to my inspiration to organize and make the space useful again.
 

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5,826 Posts
What a Mess!

I thought I would document my desire to reorganize my one car garage/workshop. My woodworking tools share the floor space with a washer, dryer, upright freezer and a hot water heater. The outside wall has a heavy duty storage rack that takes up about 2/3 of the wall. Another storage rack and the Harbor Freight dust collector takes up the remainder of the wall space.

That leaves me with the center of the garage and the other long wall to use. After adding a cabinet table saw, an outfeed table/work bench/assembly table multiuse table, a 14 inch band saw and a 6 inch jointer. There is not a lot of room left. I also have the Harbor Freight large rolling tool box with two add-ons which take up almost 6 feet of the available wall space.

Many years ago, I built a simple work bench and bolted a vise onto it. The other day when I was doing some cleaning and sweeping, I found a magazine behind a storage rack that was dated April 1988! :) That was a year after we moved into this house. Guess I should clean up more often, huh?

After that many years you can imagine I have collected a lot of stuff. I still have some of my original Sears Craftsman tools from my first tool purchase in 1967.

I have already made several improvements. A few years ago, we had the siding replaced on our house. While the siding was off, I had the contractor insulate the outside wall of the garage.I'm glad I thought of it while the wall was open and easy to get to. We also bought a new energy efficient overhead door and had it installed.

Last summer it was 95-102 here in the Houston area. It was miserable to try to work in the shop. I even set up a pop up canopy to do some of the work outside under it. But the homeowners assoc didn't like that so I took it down.

As a result, I bought a Fedders 12K split system air conditioner and me and my son installed it. He works for a HVAC company and did the AC part. I hired an electrician to run a new dedicated circuit for the AC unit. The outside unit sits behind the privacy fence and is actually only about 6 feet from the electrical service panel.

The following week, I had an insulating company blow in 11 inches of insulation in the ceiling over the garage, the adjacent bedroom and bathroom. Boy howdy, what a difference that insulation made. One of the added benefits is sound deadner. It has really muffled outside noise. In fact, you can't hardly hear the overhead door when it opens or closes.

The big difference is the insulating factor. With all of the walls (and ceiling) insulated, the garage is just like the rest of the house. The AC keeps the temp at about 74 deg F. It will drop it to 73 if I don't raise the door much.
That is while it is 90+ deg outside.

Now I can work anytime. The AC unit is also a heat pump so those cold harsh Houston winters (sic) don't faze me…33 deg outside, 69 inside. :)

The other day it was 91 outside - 74 inside. I like that a lot.
Temperature Thermostat Gadget Wood Gas


The Plan

I have devised a plan and it goes like this:

  • Clear out the 4 foot x 6 foot alcove that was used to hold a tool box and a lot of other stuff.
  • Build new upper cabinets and install them on French Cleats. Stock the cabinets with paint and stain supplies.
  • Remove the old work bench and clear out all of the junk along that wall. Paint the wall as I go.
  • Relocate the rolling tool box to make better use of the floor space.
  • Build two new cabinets and hang them above the tool box on French cleats.
  • Add some electrical receptacle boxes for power tool use by running 1/2 inch EMT conduit as needed.
  • Build new cabinets to house the bench top drill press, miter saw, and planer. Note: This is still under consideration. I haven't actually get it figured out yet but I have 92 inches of wall space to work with.
    Build more cabinets above the power tools if room allows.

Note: Once all of the cabinets have been built, I will build face frames and attach them to the cabinets. Doors will probably come last.

Before Pictures

Here are some pics taken before I started this project.
Wood Shelving Tool cabinet Cabinetry Shelf


Shelf Shelving Automotive tire Gas Building


Shelf Wood Shelving Hardwood Plastic


Wood Shelving Gas Machine Electrical wiring


I guess that is all for now. In the next segment, I will start building the cabinets for the alcove and get them hung and stocked.
I hope the redo will go off without a hitch. You will enjoy it and it will be a rewarding experience. My suggestion would be to divide it up into segments and finish each project completely before starting with another. This way you can see the improvements as you go along and it will be a wonderful motivator. Good luck!

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
 

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· Registered
Joined
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1,188 Posts
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
Mike,

Great cabinets, good solid build.

3/4" plywood, should be able to park a Buick in them if need be. ;-)

Best Regards. - Grandpa Len.

Work Safely and have Fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
Thanks grandpa. They are square, level, and screwed together. The face frame should make them look like one cabinet.
 

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· Registered
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1,038 Posts
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
very nice.great work and already filled up.what more could you want.thanks for sharing…
 

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1,423 Posts
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
Great start. Starting to look better already. Gotta Love the Kreg Jig. Thanks for the small tip about the Lowes Bucket Max been wondering how well they work. May have to pick one up for the shop.

CtL
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Cabinets for the Alcove

Finally, I am making some progress. The first two cabinets are being made from A/B Sanded pine plywood. Since I am painting them, they should look OK when I get through.

I forgot to mention in the first entry that I am using pocket hole construction to build the cabinets. No glue is used except where I attach the French cleat to the back of the cabinet. I glued and screwed it. I used this series of Kreg videos as my inspiration and I sorta followed the guys path of construction.

I have a pocket hole jig that I bought last year. It works pretty good for me. I attached the dust collector shroud and usually connect it to a Bucket Max from Lowe's. It provides good suction and generally helps keep the board sucked to the jig when I am moving it around and setting up to drill the next hole.

Wood Engineering Handheld power drill Gas Machine


It hangs on the wall when not in use.
Wood Rectangle Gas Office ruler Electric blue


Wood Table Wood stain Hardwood Workbench


Pneumatic tool Handheld power drill Drill Wood Tool


As stated previously, I built two cabinets and mounted them on the wall using French cleats. One cabinet would have been hard for me to mount by myself. So I built two of them.

I painted the pieces before assembly. Much easier on my tired old aching arms. A coat of primer and two coats of Battleship Gray! :)
Plant Table Picnic table Wood Outdoor table


Tire Wheel Table Wood Road surface


Table saws Wood Wheel Table Tire


And here are the cabinets hung and stocked with all of my paints and stains that I normally use. I am a pretty happy camper.

Shelf Shelving Wall Gas Major appliance


I may add another shelf later but for now, that is all I am going to do until it is time to build the face frames.

Note: To drill the shelf pin holes, I bought the Kreg Shelf Pin Jig. That thing works great. I wish it was longer, but I made it. I even helped a friend that needed shelf pins for her entertainment center. I was able to set up a spacer and drill the holes for her. Perfect!

Stay tuned. Don't touch that dial. The next entry will be the construction of the cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above the rolling tool box.
I couldn't stand the mess any longer. Today, I cleaned off the metal shelving unit, posted a picture of it on FaceBook, and found someone to take it. Turns out, it was my wife's nephew. His girlfriend has potted plants and this stand will work great for them. I have had this stand for almost thirty years. :)

Before:
Wood Shelving Shelf Gas Ladder


With the stand removed and the area cleaned up, I proceeded to attach a couple of pieces of 1/2 inch plywood to the wall. And I mounted a shelf that I had used previously. It has a power bar. That should come in handy.

One of the reasons I wanted this wall space, is to store my pocket hole jig and the table saw sled.
I screwed on a bracket of the pocket hole jig/sled to rest on and added a lip of 1/2 inch plywood. To keep it from falling, I fabricated two catches to hold the sled in place.

Then I mounted a shaker peg on the plywood so the table saw sled would have a place to hang. There was already a hole in the sled, so this worked nicely.

Lastly, I added a separate piece of plywood with another shaker peg so my table saw auxiliary fence would have a place to hang. When all was said and done, my HVLP sprayer sits underneath nicely.

Finding a place to hang these pieces of equipment helped clear the floor of stuff that constantly gets in the way.

After:
Here is the after pic with everything in it's place. Feeling pretty happy tonight.
Wood Gas Shelving Building Household supply
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
New Cabinets Over the Tool Box

To prepare for the next phase of the makeover, I demoed the old work bench that has served me well for the last 20+ years. Fortunately, it was built with drywall screws and came apart easily. I only had to pull the 6 nails that I used to fasten it to the wall. I called a friend and he came over and loaded it up. In a week or so, I'll go help him set it up in his garage.

I cleaned up the area and painted the part of the wall that I could get to. Then with a lot of pushing and pulling, I managed to move the toolbox down the wall to where I wanted it to sit. It is heavy and thank goodness the heavy duty casters worked great. Then I painted the wall that had been blocked by the toolbox.

The wall is starting to look pretty good. Fresh paint always helps! :) I have a blank canvas! :)
Property Wood Shade Building Wall


Part of my makeover plan is to build and install cabinets above the rolling toolbox. With the toolbox in place, I was ready to start building the two cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above it.

I bought a couple of sheets of Birch plywood from Clark's Hardwood Lumber Co. - a local lumber distributor. They have a lot of hardwood to chose from. The birch was $40/sheet which is as good as I can get in my area for 3/4 inch A/B plywood.

Here is a pic of my "plan". I had to make a couple of adjustments on the fly so take the dimensions with a grain of salt! :)
Wood Font Rectangle Handwriting Gas


Each cabinet has three components.

  • Each cabinet will have six compartments for storing plastic "tackle trays" which have everything from screws to bolts…and more. With 12 compartments, I can keep the most used trays within easy reach and have the others stored for use if needed.

  • Immediately above these compartments will be six compartments with 1/4 inch plywood dividers. These will be used to store drills/ drivers, nail guns, etc. Again, all within easy reach.

  • Above those compartments will be a storage area with shelf pins so shelves can be adjusted to whatever height I need. I am pretty stoked about this design. I think it is going to work out great.

Later I will build the face frames and add doors to the top portion.

So, let's get to cutting, routing, painting and get 'em put together.
Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Bumper


I'd like to mention here that to break down the plywood sheets, I used a track saw that I bought recently with this project in mind. It is the CS55 model made by Scheppach. It looks identical to the Grizzly model in every way. I also bought the 55 inch track from Grizzly to give me over 100 inches of saw capability. All parts fit like they came out of the same box. :) So far, I haven't had any problems with the saw or track pieces and I am getting more comfortable with the saw with each use.

Here are the two sides of the first cabinet with my layout lines marked for routing. I have an exact width dado jig made similar to the one The Wood Whisperer built. Thanks for the inspiration, Marc. I used a 1/2 inch flush trim bit to cut the 3/4 inch and the 1/2 inch dadoes. For the 1/4 inch dadoes, I switched to a guide bushing and used a 3/16 router bit made specifically for undersize plywood. I took a lot of time to layout where the dadoes needed to go, and fortunately for me, all worked out perfect. I guess I was just lucky.

Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring Automotive exterior


After drilling the shelf pin holes, I was ready to paint and assemble it.
Here it is ready to hang. Touch up painting will come later.
Shelving Wood Building Shade Flooring


Here is the cabinet hanging on the wall before I moved the toolbox.
Rectangle Shelving Wood Facade Tints and shades


Trial fit with some of my tools and tackle trays.
Rectangle Shelving Gas Tints and shades Machine


Close up!
Shelving Bottle Gas Facade Machine


This pic is after I relocated the toolbox.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


Cabinetry Shelving Wood Rectangle Gas


When my friend came over, he helped me scoot the cabinet over a couple of inches so it is now in the right spot.

Next up is some electrical mods. I am going to put in a couple of receptacles connected with 1/2 inch EMT conduit.

Stay tuned. more coming soon.
 

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New Cabinets Over the Tool Box

To prepare for the next phase of the makeover, I demoed the old work bench that has served me well for the last 20+ years. Fortunately, it was built with drywall screws and came apart easily. I only had to pull the 6 nails that I used to fasten it to the wall. I called a friend and he came over and loaded it up. In a week or so, I'll go help him set it up in his garage.

I cleaned up the area and painted the part of the wall that I could get to. Then with a lot of pushing and pulling, I managed to move the toolbox down the wall to where I wanted it to sit. It is heavy and thank goodness the heavy duty casters worked great. Then I painted the wall that had been blocked by the toolbox.

The wall is starting to look pretty good. Fresh paint always helps! :) I have a blank canvas! :)
Property Wood Shade Building Wall


Part of my makeover plan is to build and install cabinets above the rolling toolbox. With the toolbox in place, I was ready to start building the two cabinets that will be mounted on the wall above it.

I bought a couple of sheets of Birch plywood from Clark's Hardwood Lumber Co. - a local lumber distributor. They have a lot of hardwood to chose from. The birch was $40/sheet which is as good as I can get in my area for 3/4 inch A/B plywood.

Here is a pic of my "plan". I had to make a couple of adjustments on the fly so take the dimensions with a grain of salt! :)
Wood Font Rectangle Handwriting Gas


Each cabinet has three components.

  • Each cabinet will have six compartments for storing plastic "tackle trays" which have everything from screws to bolts…and more. With 12 compartments, I can keep the most used trays within easy reach and have the others stored for use if needed.

  • Immediately above these compartments will be six compartments with 1/4 inch plywood dividers. These will be used to store drills/ drivers, nail guns, etc. Again, all within easy reach.

  • Above those compartments will be a storage area with shelf pins so shelves can be adjusted to whatever height I need. I am pretty stoked about this design. I think it is going to work out great.

Later I will build the face frames and add doors to the top portion.

So, let's get to cutting, routing, painting and get 'em put together.
Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Bumper


I'd like to mention here that to break down the plywood sheets, I used a track saw that I bought recently with this project in mind. It is the CS55 model made by Scheppach. It looks identical to the Grizzly model in every way. I also bought the 55 inch track from Grizzly to give me over 100 inches of saw capability. All parts fit like they came out of the same box. :) So far, I haven't had any problems with the saw or track pieces and I am getting more comfortable with the saw with each use.

Here are the two sides of the first cabinet with my layout lines marked for routing. I have an exact width dado jig made similar to the one The Wood Whisperer built. Thanks for the inspiration, Marc. I used a 1/2 inch flush trim bit to cut the 3/4 inch and the 1/2 inch dadoes. For the 1/4 inch dadoes, I switched to a guide bushing and used a 3/16 router bit made specifically for undersize plywood. I took a lot of time to layout where the dadoes needed to go, and fortunately for me, all worked out perfect. I guess I was just lucky.

Wood Rectangle Floor Flooring Automotive exterior


After drilling the shelf pin holes, I was ready to paint and assemble it.
Here it is ready to hang. Touch up painting will come later.
Shelving Wood Building Shade Flooring


Here is the cabinet hanging on the wall before I moved the toolbox.
Rectangle Shelving Wood Facade Tints and shades


Trial fit with some of my tools and tackle trays.
Rectangle Shelving Gas Tints and shades Machine


Close up!
Shelving Bottle Gas Facade Machine


This pic is after I relocated the toolbox.
Cabinetry Property Wood Interior design Drawer


Cabinetry Shelving Wood Rectangle Gas


When my friend came over, he helped me scoot the cabinet over a couple of inches so it is now in the right spot.

Next up is some electrical mods. I am going to put in a couple of receptacles connected with 1/2 inch EMT conduit.

Stay tuned. more coming soon.
Mike, Really like that wall cabinet. Great idea on the tackle box storage.

CtL
 

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