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Hey everyone. This is my first post on LJ. I'm glad to be among fellow craftsmen. I have an idea to mount my table saw, chop saw and belt/disc sander to a surface where I can make dust and keep it out of my garage. I really don't want to use those tools in the garage but rather have a place I can attach all the heavy dust making stuff and move it in the driveway. I wondered if you guys had any ideas . My table saw is a smaller ryobi . It doesn't have legs or a.stand. I'm wondering how everyone else sets up their outside workspace when using all these tools I mentioned. Thanks
 

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If you're making a dedicated lower area for the tablesaw to match the height of the rest of the table, it might be a good idea to make the area deeper, wider and longer. That way you can shim up and infill the gaps around the table with whatever saw you have. Should you decide to get a different saw, your table won't have to be rebuilt. Having a large area with the table flat for whatever operation you're performing can be very helpful and safer.
 

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I use six swivel casters with lock and brake for my custom table saw and planer base (see my project gallery). Including the R4512 saw, the DW734 planer, and the weight of the base itself (which stores jigs, accessories, and cans of paint/stain), the getup weighs probably more than 400 lbs - and I have no problems moving it with the casters, or making it immobile just by kicking the brake/lock on two or three of them (even though they all lock and brake). The casters are just basic 3" casters from Home Depot, that have both a friction brake and a locking mechanism that engages when you kick down the tab.

I used a 1.5" thick conference room tabletop for my table saw/planer base (my office was throwing it away), but a torsion box would work great too.

Also, I can't take credit for that awesome multi-tool station; it's just a kickin' rad project I added to my favorites. So give all props to Fridgecritter.
 

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Glad to help out. If you're looking for more small-shop ideas, I have a project in my gallery specifically on that topic. My workshop is an 11' by 17' room with a 7.5' ceiling, and I manage to pack in a decent sized hybrid table saw, router table, oscillating sander, drill press, planer, two-stage dust collector, two-stage shop vac, and (in a few hours) a 48" long jointer. Plus a workbench, rolling storage cart/assembly/outfeed table, lumber rack, offcut cart, and plywood cart.

It's a little cramped but if I roll the table saw/planer stand into the middle of the room I can rip up to 8' length (longer if I open the shop door), and if I roll it back I have plenty of room in the center of the shop to work.
 

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I actually updated my shop significantly since I posted that project, so I may revise it or make a new project in the next week or two. I modified my table saw base to give me more storage, replaced my giant cabinet-workbench with a tricked-out Harbor Freight workbench, ditched a wall cabinet, rearranged my lumber storage, and in a few hours I'm having my new Grizzly jointer delivered.

I stand firmly by what I said in my small workshop project: the key is to view the small shop as an evolutionary process, and instead of trying to plan it all out up front it's helpful to observe your workflow and make adjustments based on what is or is not convenient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Dan. Thanks for taking the time to write with your ideas. I'm excited to check out your gallery and explore the LJ features when it comes to studying the other users. It's great when we can all learn from each other. This is a great community
 

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American Woodworker had a neat workbench idea:

I have a very cheap bench made of PT lumber that resides under my deck where I move my benchtop power tools to and use as needed. It's a split elevation design, with the lower height setup to match my table saw, so that the upper elevation serves as outfeed.
 

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American Woodworker had a neat workbench idea:

I have a very cheap bench made of PT lumber that resides under my deck where I move my benchtop power tools to and use as needed. It s a split elevation design, with the lower height setup to match my table saw, so that the upper elevation serves as outfeed.

- paxorion
That's a pretty cool looking work bench. I can only dream of a smooth floor like that. Every mobile tool I have usually has a shim under one caster to keep it steady when I am using it. :-(
 
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