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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Porter Cable Dovetail Jig Joinery

Continuing the Lesson's Learned Theme:

I used mitered joints for my Mom's jewelry box that I completed last weekend. Moving on to my wife's box, I decided to up the level of the craftsmanship and use half-blind dovetails to join the box sides. I went to my PC Dovetail jig to do this. I have very limited time logged with this jig, so I had to refer to the manual for setup as it has been a while. Here are a couple things that I would have liked to have known prior to the process:

~I got lucky in that I trimmed the thickness of the board to 1/2". This is the minimum width the the jig can cut half-blinds.

~Placing a piece of scrap stock that is same width as the piece next to to the piece will eliminate chip out on the final pin/tail cut.

~Labeling all 4 sides helps keep the cuts organized.

~The side facing the jig is the outside of the assembled joint.

~It's much easier to err to the side of a too tight joint and lightly sand it, then it is to have a joint that is too loose and try to fill it with wood filler.
 

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Porter Cable Dovetail Jig Joinery

Continuing the Lesson's Learned Theme:

I used mitered joints for my Mom's jewelry box that I completed last weekend. Moving on to my wife's box, I decided to up the level of the craftsmanship and use half-blind dovetails to join the box sides. I went to my PC Dovetail jig to do this. I have very limited time logged with this jig, so I had to refer to the manual for setup as it has been a while. Here are a couple things that I would have liked to have known prior to the process:

~I got lucky in that I trimmed the thickness of the board to 1/2". This is the minimum width the the jig can cut half-blinds.

~Placing a piece of scrap stock that is same width as the piece next to to the piece will eliminate chip out on the final pin/tail cut.

~Labeling all 4 sides helps keep the cuts organized.

~The side facing the jig is the outside of the assembled joint.

~It's much easier to err to the side of a too tight joint and lightly sand it, then it is to have a joint that is too loose and try to fill it with wood filler.
All good lessons. I havn't spent much time with half blinds so I bet they can be finicky with bit depth for fine tuning fit. Let's see some pictures!
 

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Porter Cable Dovetail Jig Joinery

Continuing the Lesson's Learned Theme:

I used mitered joints for my Mom's jewelry box that I completed last weekend. Moving on to my wife's box, I decided to up the level of the craftsmanship and use half-blind dovetails to join the box sides. I went to my PC Dovetail jig to do this. I have very limited time logged with this jig, so I had to refer to the manual for setup as it has been a while. Here are a couple things that I would have liked to have known prior to the process:

~I got lucky in that I trimmed the thickness of the board to 1/2". This is the minimum width the the jig can cut half-blinds.

~Placing a piece of scrap stock that is same width as the piece next to to the piece will eliminate chip out on the final pin/tail cut.

~Labeling all 4 sides helps keep the cuts organized.

~The side facing the jig is the outside of the assembled joint.

~It's much easier to err to the side of a too tight joint and lightly sand it, then it is to have a joint that is too loose and try to fill it with wood filler.
sounds like it was a rewarding process!!! (Especially when you found that you had cut the wood a correct thickness!)
 

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Porter Cable Dovetail Jig Joinery

Continuing the Lesson's Learned Theme:

I used mitered joints for my Mom's jewelry box that I completed last weekend. Moving on to my wife's box, I decided to up the level of the craftsmanship and use half-blind dovetails to join the box sides. I went to my PC Dovetail jig to do this. I have very limited time logged with this jig, so I had to refer to the manual for setup as it has been a while. Here are a couple things that I would have liked to have known prior to the process:

~I got lucky in that I trimmed the thickness of the board to 1/2". This is the minimum width the the jig can cut half-blinds.

~Placing a piece of scrap stock that is same width as the piece next to to the piece will eliminate chip out on the final pin/tail cut.

~Labeling all 4 sides helps keep the cuts organized.

~The side facing the jig is the outside of the assembled joint.

~It's much easier to err to the side of a too tight joint and lightly sand it, then it is to have a joint that is too loose and try to fill it with wood filler.
I have the same jig - these are great lessons learned. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Half-Blind joints Pics (The Good and the Bad!)

Here are the Half-Blind joints I was commenting on in my prior entry. Here is the first one I did. I did it without tweaking the jig.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, there was a consistent gap. The tails didn't quite fit in snuggly. I made a slight tweak of the depth, and got a much better result:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, I am creating a pine prototype as I go. I still make a lot of errors as a newbie and don't want to ruin the Walnut if I can help it.
 

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Half-Blind joints Pics (The Good and the Bad!)

Here are the Half-Blind joints I was commenting on in my prior entry. Here is the first one I did. I did it without tweaking the jig.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, there was a consistent gap. The tails didn't quite fit in snuggly. I made a slight tweak of the depth, and got a much better result:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, I am creating a pine prototype as I go. I still make a lot of errors as a newbie and don't want to ruin the Walnut if I can help it.
You came back the 2nd time and did a lot better Jeff. Good to practice on the cheap stuff. You are most wise.

Please don't ruin the Walnut, of the Cherry, or the Babinga….you get the picture.
 

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Half-Blind joints Pics (The Good and the Bad!)

Here are the Half-Blind joints I was commenting on in my prior entry. Here is the first one I did. I did it without tweaking the jig.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, there was a consistent gap. The tails didn't quite fit in snuggly. I made a slight tweak of the depth, and got a much better result:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, I am creating a pine prototype as I go. I still make a lot of errors as a newbie and don't want to ruin the Walnut if I can help it.
Ah, the benefit of a test cut.
 

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Half-Blind joints Pics (The Good and the Bad!)

Here are the Half-Blind joints I was commenting on in my prior entry. Here is the first one I did. I did it without tweaking the jig.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, there was a consistent gap. The tails didn't quite fit in snuggly. I made a slight tweak of the depth, and got a much better result:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, I am creating a pine prototype as I go. I still make a lot of errors as a newbie and don't want to ruin the Walnut if I can help it.
Way to go newbie, let the pine take the brunt of the mistakes while you are learning. You sound like an old pro! Good work, Jeff.
 

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Half-Blind joints Pics (The Good and the Bad!)

Here are the Half-Blind joints I was commenting on in my prior entry. Here is the first one I did. I did it without tweaking the jig.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, there was a consistent gap. The tails didn't quite fit in snuggly. I made a slight tweak of the depth, and got a much better result:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, I am creating a pine prototype as I go. I still make a lot of errors as a newbie and don't want to ruin the Walnut if I can help it.
great job!! i'm impressed
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Half-Blind joints Pics (The Good and the Bad!)

Here are the Half-Blind joints I was commenting on in my prior entry. Here is the first one I did. I did it without tweaking the jig.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, there was a consistent gap. The tails didn't quite fit in snuggly. I made a slight tweak of the depth, and got a much better result:

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

As you can see, I am creating a pine prototype as I go. I still make a lot of errors as a newbie and don't want to ruin the Walnut if I can help it.
I'm hoping to be able to complete the pine one without many errors, but like I said, it's better the pine than the good stuff. I want to play with some of the colored stains (brand?) I've seen at Lowe's. I normally don't like painted furniture as much, but the colored stains look cool in that there are unlimited colors, but you still see the grain of the wood. I think they would be great stains for inlay and accents. I'm going to buy the little sample pack. It has a dozen or so tiny packets of different colors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Assembled Case and Installed Felt

After cutting all the half-blinds, glued up and assembled the box sides. I cut a dado around all 4 sides for the solid wood bottom leaving a little room for potential wood expansion. I lined the bottom of the Walnut piece with red self-adhesive felt and lined the practice pine piece with dark blue felt. I've clamped up the stock I am cutting the lid from and will start shaping it on Saturday.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
 

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Assembled Case and Installed Felt

After cutting all the half-blinds, glued up and assembled the box sides. I cut a dado around all 4 sides for the solid wood bottom leaving a little room for potential wood expansion. I lined the bottom of the Walnut piece with red self-adhesive felt and lined the practice pine piece with dark blue felt. I've clamped up the stock I am cutting the lid from and will start shaping it on Saturday.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Did you put the felt on before putting the bottom in, or after? I want to do a box but have pondered that order.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Assembled Case and Installed Felt

After cutting all the half-blinds, glued up and assembled the box sides. I cut a dado around all 4 sides for the solid wood bottom leaving a little room for potential wood expansion. I lined the bottom of the Walnut piece with red self-adhesive felt and lined the practice pine piece with dark blue felt. I've clamped up the stock I am cutting the lid from and will start shaping it on Saturday.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
I have done it both ways. On my Mom's box (see my other projects) I did it after the assembly. I intentionally cut the felt slightly larger than needed all the way around and went back with an Xacto knife an easily trimmed it flush to the sides. On this project I put the felt on before assembly. The dado or rabbet has to be a hair thicker to accept the felt. I wanted to do this on this project, because it is a shallower box and the felt will get more attention. Both ways were pretty simple. I would say, finish the inside of the box before applying the felt. I had to tape up the felt to avoid the finish running onto it.
 

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Assembled Case and Installed Felt

After cutting all the half-blinds, glued up and assembled the box sides. I cut a dado around all 4 sides for the solid wood bottom leaving a little room for potential wood expansion. I lined the bottom of the Walnut piece with red self-adhesive felt and lined the practice pine piece with dark blue felt. I've clamped up the stock I am cutting the lid from and will start shaping it on Saturday.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
Boc fans,

I follow a different lining schedule after reading a great article in Fine Woodworking #185 about the subject. The coolest stuff was from Emily Palm of Blue Heron Woodworks. She uses the sheet foam from the hobby store (about a buck for a 9×12), to which I usually add a layer of chipboard on the bottom.
bottom

Sized a little undersized you can put the slip foam assembly in after all boring, sanding and finishing are complete. Use a butter knife to push all the edges in for a trim fit. If you can get to the article mentioned there are many wonderful tips on how to finish the inside of the box to purpose it better for the end user.
 

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Assembled Case and Installed Felt

After cutting all the half-blinds, glued up and assembled the box sides. I cut a dado around all 4 sides for the solid wood bottom leaving a little room for potential wood expansion. I lined the bottom of the Walnut piece with red self-adhesive felt and lined the practice pine piece with dark blue felt. I've clamped up the stock I am cutting the lid from and will start shaping it on Saturday.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket
They are looking good. Waiting to see the lids.
 
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