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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Installing the drawer

The drawer will hang from the underside of the oak workbench top and it will extend out under the tool tray. I set the drawer back about 1" from the front of the bench so as to have some clamping surface available without removing the drawer. Since the top is 14" deep, that allows for about 13" of drawer runner mounted to the under side of the top. The drawer is 18" long, so it will extend under the tool tray by about 5-6 inches without support. I don't think this will be a problem. I could have extended the drawer runners beyond the back of the bench top, but I am concerned that this could get in the way when transporting the workbench. The top is big and heavy, so having sticks of wood sticking out is probably not a good idea. I think it will have plenty of support with the runners just under the bench top.

The drawer runners (slides) are made from oak. I glued and screwed oak runners on the drawer sides. The runners are 3/4" x 3/4".

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I added about 1-1/2" extension off the back of the drawer as extra support for when the drawer is pulled out and gives a little extra to access the back of the drawer without dropping the drawer on my toe. You may notice that my screws were a bit too long and poked through the sides. I purchased 1-1/2" wood screws instead of 1-1/4". Stuff happens on a big project and I used them anyway. I filed the points off flush to the wood. You can't even feel them. That will remind be to be more careful in the future.

Next I made the oak runners for under the bench top. I glued and screwed a 3/4" x 1-1/2" piece to a 3/4" x 3/4" piece into an L shape. This gets screwed to the underside of the workbench top. This is cross grain so I enlarged the holes toward the back end of the runners to give the top some room to move. I don't know if that is enough, but time will tell. It's just a workbench anyway.

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Now the drawer can slide in and I refine the fit with a hand plane so that it slides smooth and easy. I added a stop to the underside of the tool tray.

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Wood Table Floor Flooring Plank


On that last picture, there is a plant stand behind the bench, but it kind of looks like there is hook under the drawer.

I think the drawer is nice addition on this workbench. It is easily removed and does not impact the portability of the workbench. I do not intend to add a knob to the drawer. I don't think it is necessary. You can easily pull from under the bottom edge of the drawer. But if you wanted one, an iron ring pull is a nice addition. Brass would look out of place on this workbench. Hmm, maybe I will add one…

Next I will add a lower shelf across the stretchers.
The drawer is great. I use it to hold loose tools. I did not add dividers, but you could if you like that. Thanks for reading. :)

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Flooring Plywood
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
A Shelf

The Moravian workbench is really designed for use with hand tools. Having a shelf below the bench is helpful to set some tools and keep larger items out of the way. The original example at Old Salem had a simple shelf which was a board set on the stretchers.

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I also want a shelf on my workbench but it needs to be removable to maintain the portability of the workbench. I designed my own shelf so that it can be easily removed and carried by one person. It is bracketed on three sides to help keep items from falling off when banging on the workbench. It has two battens on the bottom to help keep it flat and center it across the stretchers. The size is roughly 24" deep by 26" wide. The width was mostly determined by the bottom boards. I used 3/4" by 9" white pine boards for the bottom. I decided to tongue and groove the boards because I have a vintage Stanley swing arm T&G plane which is fun to use and it is a traditional glue joint for shelving. It's a good idea to straighten and joint the boards before the tongue and grooving. I did that with a jack plane.

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For the sides, I used a single dovetail on the corners to join the boards. The sides on mine are 2-1/2" tall.

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I considered grooving the sides and rabbeting the bottom like I did on the tool tray, but that just seemed overkill. Also, the grain for the bottom boards runs front to back across the stretchers which creates a pretty wide area for wood movement. It seemed like a lot of expansion and contraction to accommodate in the sides. So I decided to just nail the sides on from under the bottom without any glue. I predrilled the nail holes for the back piece with some oversized to help accommodate wood movement in the bottom. For fun, I used traditional cut box nails. I think they hold better than wire nails also. Once it was nailed together, I planed off the extra on the sides and back of the bottom.

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The last step was to add the battens to the bottom. I used an off cut of yellow pine from the tool tray. It is screwed to the underside of the bottom. The center screw is tight and the two end screws are in oversized (elongated) holes and they are not cinched down too tight so as to allow for some expansion in the bottom. I am told the pine does not move as much as other woods, but we'll see. Really no big deal anyway considering it is a workbench shelf and it will get pretty beat up over time. It just needs to stay together.

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That pretty much concludes the "storage" areas for my workbench. Now I have the tool tray, a drawer and a shelf to keep my tools organized and off the work surface.

Next up is a traditional planing stop for holding the work.
 

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A Shelf

The Moravian workbench is really designed for use with hand tools. Having a shelf below the bench is helpful to set some tools and keep larger items out of the way. The original example at Old Salem had a simple shelf which was a board set on the stretchers.

Table Wood Computer desk Flooring Floor


I also want a shelf on my workbench but it needs to be removable to maintain the portability of the workbench. I designed my own shelf so that it can be easily removed and carried by one person. It is bracketed on three sides to help keep items from falling off when banging on the workbench. It has two battens on the bottom to help keep it flat and center it across the stretchers. The size is roughly 24" deep by 26" wide. The width was mostly determined by the bottom boards. I used 3/4" by 9" white pine boards for the bottom. I decided to tongue and groove the boards because I have a vintage Stanley swing arm T&G plane which is fun to use and it is a traditional glue joint for shelving. It's a good idea to straighten and joint the boards before the tongue and grooving. I did that with a jack plane.

Wood Outdoor furniture Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


For the sides, I used a single dovetail on the corners to join the boards. The sides on mine are 2-1/2" tall.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Table Flooring Outdoor furniture Floor


Table Wood Wood stain Workbench Plank


I considered grooving the sides and rabbeting the bottom like I did on the tool tray, but that just seemed overkill. Also, the grain for the bottom boards runs front to back across the stretchers which creates a pretty wide area for wood movement. It seemed like a lot of expansion and contraction to accommodate in the sides. So I decided to just nail the sides on from under the bottom without any glue. I predrilled the nail holes for the back piece with some oversized to help accommodate wood movement in the bottom. For fun, I used traditional cut box nails. I think they hold better than wire nails also. Once it was nailed together, I planed off the extra on the sides and back of the bottom.

Wood Hand tool Wood stain Hardwood Plank


Wood Table Flooring Floor Wood stain


The last step was to add the battens to the bottom. I used an off cut of yellow pine from the tool tray. It is screwed to the underside of the bottom. The center screw is tight and the two end screws are in oversized (elongated) holes and they are not cinched down too tight so as to allow for some expansion in the bottom. I am told the pine does not move as much as other woods, but we'll see. Really no big deal anyway considering it is a workbench shelf and it will get pretty beat up over time. It just needs to stay together.

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Wood Rectangle Table Hardwood Wood stain


Table Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


Wood Natural material Hardwood Wood stain Plank


That pretty much concludes the "storage" areas for my workbench. Now I have the tool tray, a drawer and a shelf to keep my tools organized and off the work surface.

Next up is a traditional planing stop for holding the work.
Hey Tom,
Yet again, another wonderful post. I am thoroughly enjoying this fabulous build. Such a striking bench and great display of thought and skill!

Best regards from Australia,
Siggy
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
The Iron Planing Stop

The original Moravian workbench has a couple of square holes where planing stops were installed during its lifetime. On Will Myers design, he installed a custom tail vise setup with dog holes along the front of the bench. I like this setup very much and I may install something similar someday, but for now I just want a traditional iron planing stop in keeping with the historical workbench. I think that will work fine as I plan to use the workbench for breaking down and planing bigger stock for a project. And also for larger carpentry projects. As you can see in my profile, I have a joinery bench and it already has an end vise and dogging system. So I am not in great need for that right now. If I ever move, the Moravian workbench is the one that will move with me and then I may want to add the dogging system to further increase the usability of the workbench.

I decided to use an iron planing stop from a blacksmith. During the visit to the Woodwright's school, the class made a visit to Peter Ross's workshop and he demonstrated making the iron planing stop. It was really awesome. Peter is a historian and I am not sure that he really wants to be in the tool business at this stage of his career. I would have loved to get a planing stop from Peter, but I guess I wasn't comfortable to pester him about it. So I found another blacksmith on Etsy and he made a custom planing stop for me to my specs. He now offers it on his Etsy site as a standard item. It was made by Eric Dennis at Roundhouse Blacksmith. Here is a link to the listing if you want to buy one. Eric is quite a craftsman and he is quite friendly. He will also customize if needed. This is just a friendly recommendation, I am not on Eric's payroll.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/738230731/workbench-planing-stop-traditional

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These iron stops are usually installed into a block of wood that is tightly fit into the square hole in the bench top. The block of wood can be knocked up and down with a mallet to adjust the height of the planing stop. I split out a billet from a piece of oak firewood.

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Then I planed the piece as square and true as possible, checking it for any twist with the winding sticks.

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Then I cut the ends to length which is about 12" and chamfered the corners.

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Next I mortised out the hole in the top of the workbench. It was a bit nerve racking to cut into that beautiful thick oak top, but it had to be done. I laid out the location and marked off the size from the block of wood which is about 2-1/4" square. The block is located about 3" left of the vise and 3" from the front of the top. I bored out the waste with an auger but only from the top. I was not confident that the top was square enough to locate the hole on the bottom of the bench. I angled the corner holes ever so slightly toward the center and figured I would need to do significantly more chisel work from the bottom to clear out the waste. It worked out fine. It was a lot of chiseling and testing to get a tight fit that was reasonably plumb to the workbench top. You can actually use the block of wood as a planing stop if you are so inclined. It works pretty well.

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Now came the hard part, creating the tapered mortise for the stem of the planing stop in the block of oak. The stem on the stop has a modest taper from about 5/8" square at the top down to about 1/2" square at the bottom. I laid out the location of the mortise and I very carefully bored a 1/2" hole to the depth of the stem, about 4" deep. Then I pared out the mortise with a long bevel edged chisel. The one I used was an old Stanley socket chisel, which was sturdy enough for the mallet but thin enough for paring down inside the deep mortise. I simply worked it down with a lot of testing until the stem was fitting snugly, but not enough to split the oak block. It was a bit tedious and took about 45 minutes.

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Then I chiseled out to recess the blade into the block somewhat. The iron stop is hand made and there is some variance to the dimensions, so it is a matter of again working down the recess and testing with the iron stop. I left the top of the iron a little bit proud of the block surface. Then I set the block and iron into the work bench and chiseled out a corresponding recess into the bench top for the blade so that it can be set completely flush to bench when not in use.

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I have noticed a little bit of shrinkage in my wood block, it doesn't fit as tightly as before. If it loosens too much, I can add a thin veneer to tighten it up, or create a new block. Time will tell. It's fine for now.

Next I will finish up with some work holding details and examples.
 

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The Iron Planing Stop

The original Moravian workbench has a couple of square holes where planing stops were installed during its lifetime. On Will Myers design, he installed a custom tail vise setup with dog holes along the front of the bench. I like this setup very much and I may install something similar someday, but for now I just want a traditional iron planing stop in keeping with the historical workbench. I think that will work fine as I plan to use the workbench for breaking down and planing bigger stock for a project. And also for larger carpentry projects. As you can see in my profile, I have a joinery bench and it already has an end vise and dogging system. So I am not in great need for that right now. If I ever move, the Moravian workbench is the one that will move with me and then I may want to add the dogging system to further increase the usability of the workbench.

I decided to use an iron planing stop from a blacksmith. During the visit to the Woodwright's school, the class made a visit to Peter Ross's workshop and he demonstrated making the iron planing stop. It was really awesome. Peter is a historian and I am not sure that he really wants to be in the tool business at this stage of his career. I would have loved to get a planing stop from Peter, but I guess I wasn't comfortable to pester him about it. So I found another blacksmith on Etsy and he made a custom planing stop for me to my specs. He now offers it on his Etsy site as a standard item. It was made by Eric Dennis at Roundhouse Blacksmith. Here is a link to the listing if you want to buy one. Eric is quite a craftsman and he is quite friendly. He will also customize if needed. This is just a friendly recommendation, I am not on Eric's payroll.

https://www.etsy.com/listing/738230731/workbench-planing-stop-traditional

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood Plank


These iron stops are usually installed into a block of wood that is tightly fit into the square hole in the bench top. The block of wood can be knocked up and down with a mallet to adjust the height of the planing stop. I split out a billet from a piece of oak firewood.

Wood Wood stain Plank Hardwood Lumber


Then I planed the piece as square and true as possible, checking it for any twist with the winding sticks.

Wood Gas Hardwood Creative arts Engineering


Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Lumber


Then I cut the ends to length which is about 12" and chamfered the corners.

Wood Tool Knife Hunting knife Art


Wood Tool Hardwood Wood stain Hand tool


Wood Wood stain Natural material Trunk Hardwood


Next I mortised out the hole in the top of the workbench. It was a bit nerve racking to cut into that beautiful thick oak top, but it had to be done. I laid out the location and marked off the size from the block of wood which is about 2-1/4" square. The block is located about 3" left of the vise and 3" from the front of the top. I bored out the waste with an auger but only from the top. I was not confident that the top was square enough to locate the hole on the bottom of the bench. I angled the corner holes ever so slightly toward the center and figured I would need to do significantly more chisel work from the bottom to clear out the waste. It worked out fine. It was a lot of chiseling and testing to get a tight fit that was reasonably plumb to the workbench top. You can actually use the block of wood as a planing stop if you are so inclined. It works pretty well.

Wood Drill Tool Flooring Floor


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Hand tool Wood Axe Smoothing plane Door


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plank Flooring


Smoothing plane Wood Floor Rectangle Flooring


Now came the hard part, creating the tapered mortise for the stem of the planing stop in the block of oak. The stem on the stop has a modest taper from about 5/8" square at the top down to about 1/2" square at the bottom. I laid out the location of the mortise and I very carefully bored a 1/2" hole to the depth of the stem, about 4" deep. Then I pared out the mortise with a long bevel edged chisel. The one I used was an old Stanley socket chisel, which was sturdy enough for the mallet but thin enough for paring down inside the deep mortise. I simply worked it down with a lot of testing until the stem was fitting snugly, but not enough to split the oak block. It was a bit tedious and took about 45 minutes.

Wood Tool Ratchet Gas Hand tool


Wood Wood stain Office ruler Floor Flooring


Wood Office ruler Tool Hardwood Plank


Wood Rectangle Material property Tints and shades Brick


Wood Table Office ruler Hand tool Ruler


Then I chiseled out to recess the blade into the block somewhat. The iron stop is hand made and there is some variance to the dimensions, so it is a matter of again working down the recess and testing with the iron stop. I left the top of the iron a little bit proud of the block surface. Then I set the block and iron into the work bench and chiseled out a corresponding recess into the bench top for the blade so that it can be set completely flush to bench when not in use.

Wood Hat Wood stain Hardwood Gas


Wood Ruler Office ruler Tool Floor


Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Wood stain


Brown Wood Rectangle Wood stain Plank


Wood Table Musical instrument Wood stain Floor


I have noticed a little bit of shrinkage in my wood block, it doesn't fit as tightly as before. If it loosens too much, I can add a thin veneer to tighten it up, or create a new block. Time will tell. It's fine for now.

Next I will finish up with some work holding details and examples.
Tom,

Nice addition to the workbench and a terrific explanation of the steps to complete it. Thanks for sharing.

L/W
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Simple Work Holding

I have been using the Moravian workbench for several months now. At first, I was not all that comfortable with the work holding methods, mainly because I have never used a leg vise. This was compounded by the leg vise needing to "break in" for a while. At first, it tended to be finicky moving it into position and would require nudging it with both hands. Also, I could not seem to find the best pin location for the size of the work piece and I would have to readjust. I have been using a quick release steel vise for several years which is easy to manipulate with one hand and it is very quick to move into position. By comparison, the leg vise requires a bit more manipulation and there is more stooping down to adjust. After while, the leg vise loosened up and stopped binding so that I can just wind it out to position with one hand and I got the hang of picking the right hole in the guide to align with the workpiece. Basically, I wind out the vise until the workpiece will just fit in the jaw and then wind it out a little more until the next hole in the guide opens up and insert the pin in that hole. Works every time.

Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain Hardwood


The leg vise has some nice advantages. It can accommodate very large workpieces. It opens to at least 12 " and it can handle wide boards since the screw is down low in the vise. It is good at handling awkward shaped and large pieces since it is big and accommodates some racking. Also, it has tremendous clamping pressure and with the leather, the workpiece does not move. I can hold long boards without supports and they stay in place.

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On the original Moravian workbench, it appears that they only used planing stops and the vise for work holding. When Will Myers did his version, he added a custom made tail vise with dog holes along the front of the workbench. It is a real nice setup. He also added one or two holes for a holdfast which is very useful.

I decided to keep the work holding fairly simplistic on my Moravian workbench. For now, I am going to skip the tail vise option on this workbench. I have one on my other workbench and it is helpful at times, but I don't use it all that often. For years I made due with a wood screw for a stop and a holdfast or clamp. Also, I am right handed and I want to be able to saw off the end of the workbench on the right side without a vise getting in the way. I really wanted the Moravian workbench for larger scale wood preparation and carpentry, but also for the occasional joinery project. For hand tool woodworking, the main tasks that I need to accommodate are:

1. Breaking down stock with the saw.
2. Cleaning up face and edge surfaces with the plane.
3. Joinery cuts with hand planes (rabbit, groove, etc.)
4. Basic work holding for joinery tasks (dovetails, dados, etc.) and wood shaping

The main work holding devices that I have on my Moravian workbench are the leg vise, the planing stop and the holdfast. Additionally, I can use a couple appliances such as the bench hook, sticking board and clamps where needed. The holdfast comes into play quite a bit. My holdfast has an 8" reach and I laid out my holes along the back of the workbench 3" from the edge. The main holes are spaced 16" apart and I have a hole 6" from each end to help with holding work for sawing off the end. Here is the layout that I established which also accommodates the drawer which I was careful to place.

Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Circle


So far, this arrangement with the holes along the back has worked out pretty well. They are back far enough that they do not interfere with the workpiece in the bench hook. So I can use the holdfast to help clamp the work for cutting or chiseling on the bench hook. Not a huge deal, but a nice thing sometimes. Also, the holdfast can reach to about 3" from the front edge, so I have pretty good coverage for holding work to the bench top. I like to avoid too many holes in my workbench and this arrangement seems pretty reasonable without turning the top into Swiss cheese.

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Sawing

As I noted earlier, sawing off the end of the bench was a priority for me. The 6" hole from the end is a great help to hold the wood for cross cutting and breaking down stock.

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Ripping boards can be done along the front of the work bench and held with the holdfast. A couple holdfasts would be helpful for longer boards.

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Shorter pieces can be ripped in the vise as well which opens up to 12".

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Smaller boards can be crosscut on the bench hook as shown earlier or in the vise as well.

Planing Stock

This workbench works great for planing boards. Face planing should really be done on the bench top, although I have seen it done in the vice as well for more modest sized pieces. For the most part I will face plane against the planing stop, moving the board as needed to keep it in place. If I need to go cross grain to flatten a wide board, I will use the holdfast to help keep it in place. The only issue is that you may need to move the holdfast around to different spots during the flattening process. Once it is flat, the holdfast can be removed and plane with the grain against the bench stop to clean it up. I will be honest and say that I don't like this kind of work all that much and I try to avoid it by obtaining good stock to begin. Then I can just clean up the surfaces to smooth them instead of working them down to dimension.

NOTE: I tried using a doe's foot or notched batten to hold the board for flattening across the grain. It really did not work very well for me because the top is only 14" wide and it left only a little room to clamp the batten at an angle with a holdfast. I think it could work if you are willing to add a bunch more holes in the top so as to find a suitable position for the holdfast, but I couldn't go there. I abandoned the idea.

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Planing the edge of boards works fine in the vise for smaller pieces.

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Planing a long, wide board works well if you rest the far end on the holdfast in the leg.

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Planing a long narrow board works well using the holdfast in the leg to clamp it to the top. The 8" reach on the holdfast is helpful here.

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Joinery

Planing grooves and rebates are a basic need for making boxes, drawers and doors. Planing a groove in a wide board is easy against the planing stop with a holdfast. The same setup can be done for a rebate.

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Cutting a groove for a narrow board is a little less straight forward. It works pretty well to use a board across the planing stop to create a stop near the front of the bench. Clamping a long 2×4 with a couple holdfasts gives a fence to set the set the work against. With the work constrained, the groove can be cut without much trouble, but you can only push against the stop and then lift off to restart the cut, else the board will move back. I do not find this to be a problem at all.

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Cutting a groove or rabbet in the edge of a narrow board for a cabinet door frame works pretty well in the vise if the piece is at least 2" wide to allow for the fence on the plane.

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And of course, the vise is best used for holding the work when cutting dovetails.

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I think that covers most of the basic workholding that I need. Every project seems to have some sort of work holding challenge if you are using hand tools, so a certain amount of ingenuity is required. I actually find that interesting. Maybe some day I will add the tail vise or add more dog holes. Time will tell…
 

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Simple Work Holding

I have been using the Moravian workbench for several months now. At first, I was not all that comfortable with the work holding methods, mainly because I have never used a leg vise. This was compounded by the leg vise needing to "break in" for a while. At first, it tended to be finicky moving it into position and would require nudging it with both hands. Also, I could not seem to find the best pin location for the size of the work piece and I would have to readjust. I have been using a quick release steel vise for several years which is easy to manipulate with one hand and it is very quick to move into position. By comparison, the leg vise requires a bit more manipulation and there is more stooping down to adjust. After while, the leg vise loosened up and stopped binding so that I can just wind it out to position with one hand and I got the hang of picking the right hole in the guide to align with the workpiece. Basically, I wind out the vise until the workpiece will just fit in the jaw and then wind it out a little more until the next hole in the guide opens up and insert the pin in that hole. Works every time.

Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain Hardwood


The leg vise has some nice advantages. It can accommodate very large workpieces. It opens to at least 12 " and it can handle wide boards since the screw is down low in the vise. It is good at handling awkward shaped and large pieces since it is big and accommodates some racking. Also, it has tremendous clamping pressure and with the leather, the workpiece does not move. I can hold long boards without supports and they stay in place.

Light Water Wood Urban design Building


Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel rim Wood


On the original Moravian workbench, it appears that they only used planing stops and the vise for work holding. When Will Myers did his version, he added a custom made tail vise with dog holes along the front of the workbench. It is a real nice setup. He also added one or two holes for a holdfast which is very useful.

I decided to keep the work holding fairly simplistic on my Moravian workbench. For now, I am going to skip the tail vise option on this workbench. I have one on my other workbench and it is helpful at times, but I don't use it all that often. For years I made due with a wood screw for a stop and a holdfast or clamp. Also, I am right handed and I want to be able to saw off the end of the workbench on the right side without a vise getting in the way. I really wanted the Moravian workbench for larger scale wood preparation and carpentry, but also for the occasional joinery project. For hand tool woodworking, the main tasks that I need to accommodate are:

1. Breaking down stock with the saw.
2. Cleaning up face and edge surfaces with the plane.
3. Joinery cuts with hand planes (rabbit, groove, etc.)
4. Basic work holding for joinery tasks (dovetails, dados, etc.) and wood shaping

The main work holding devices that I have on my Moravian workbench are the leg vise, the planing stop and the holdfast. Additionally, I can use a couple appliances such as the bench hook, sticking board and clamps where needed. The holdfast comes into play quite a bit. My holdfast has an 8" reach and I laid out my holes along the back of the workbench 3" from the edge. The main holes are spaced 16" apart and I have a hole 6" from each end to help with holding work for sawing off the end. Here is the layout that I established which also accommodates the drawer which I was careful to place.

Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Circle


So far, this arrangement with the holes along the back has worked out pretty well. They are back far enough that they do not interfere with the workpiece in the bench hook. So I can use the holdfast to help clamp the work for cutting or chiseling on the bench hook. Not a huge deal, but a nice thing sometimes. Also, the holdfast can reach to about 3" from the front edge, so I have pretty good coverage for holding work to the bench top. I like to avoid too many holes in my workbench and this arrangement seems pretty reasonable without turning the top into Swiss cheese.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Table


Sawing

As I noted earlier, sawing off the end of the bench was a priority for me. The 6" hole from the end is a great help to hold the wood for cross cutting and breaking down stock.

Table Wood Hardwood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Ripping boards can be done along the front of the work bench and held with the holdfast. A couple holdfasts would be helpful for longer boards.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Shorter pieces can be ripped in the vise as well which opens up to 12".

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Art Wooden block


Smaller boards can be crosscut on the bench hook as shown earlier or in the vise as well.

Planing Stock

This workbench works great for planing boards. Face planing should really be done on the bench top, although I have seen it done in the vice as well for more modest sized pieces. For the most part I will face plane against the planing stop, moving the board as needed to keep it in place. If I need to go cross grain to flatten a wide board, I will use the holdfast to help keep it in place. The only issue is that you may need to move the holdfast around to different spots during the flattening process. Once it is flat, the holdfast can be removed and plane with the grain against the bench stop to clean it up. I will be honest and say that I don't like this kind of work all that much and I try to avoid it by obtaining good stock to begin. Then I can just clean up the surfaces to smooth them instead of working them down to dimension.

NOTE: I tried using a doe's foot or notched batten to hold the board for flattening across the grain. It really did not work very well for me because the top is only 14" wide and it left only a little room to clamp the batten at an angle with a holdfast. I think it could work if you are willing to add a bunch more holes in the top so as to find a suitable position for the holdfast, but I couldn't go there. I abandoned the idea.

Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Table Hardwood Machine


Planing the edge of boards works fine in the vise for smaller pieces.

Plant Wood Hardwood Wood stain Flooring


Planing a long, wide board works well if you rest the far end on the holdfast in the leg.

Outdoor bench Table Wood Outdoor furniture Bench


Planing a long narrow board works well using the holdfast in the leg to clamp it to the top. The 8" reach on the holdfast is helpful here.

Furniture Wood Table Outdoor furniture Wood stain


Joinery

Planing grooves and rebates are a basic need for making boxes, drawers and doors. Planing a groove in a wide board is easy against the planing stop with a holdfast. The same setup can be done for a rebate.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Table


Cutting a groove for a narrow board is a little less straight forward. It works pretty well to use a board across the planing stop to create a stop near the front of the bench. Clamping a long 2×4 with a couple holdfasts gives a fence to set the set the work against. With the work constrained, the groove can be cut without much trouble, but you can only push against the stop and then lift off to restart the cut, else the board will move back. I do not find this to be a problem at all.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Cutting a groove or rabbet in the edge of a narrow board for a cabinet door frame works pretty well in the vise if the piece is at least 2" wide to allow for the fence on the plane.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Lumber


And of course, the vise is best used for holding the work when cutting dovetails.

Table Wood Hand tool Hardwood Brush


I think that covers most of the basic workholding that I need. Every project seems to have some sort of work holding challenge if you are using hand tools, so a certain amount of ingenuity is required. I actually find that interesting. Maybe some day I will add the tail vise or add more dog holes. Time will tell…
This is an awesome write-up. Thanks for taking the time and being so detailed. I just started the top for my moravian bench a couple of days ago. I am really excited about the utility of this style of bench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Simple Work Holding

I have been using the Moravian workbench for several months now. At first, I was not all that comfortable with the work holding methods, mainly because I have never used a leg vise. This was compounded by the leg vise needing to "break in" for a while. At first, it tended to be finicky moving it into position and would require nudging it with both hands. Also, I could not seem to find the best pin location for the size of the work piece and I would have to readjust. I have been using a quick release steel vise for several years which is easy to manipulate with one hand and it is very quick to move into position. By comparison, the leg vise requires a bit more manipulation and there is more stooping down to adjust. After while, the leg vise loosened up and stopped binding so that I can just wind it out to position with one hand and I got the hang of picking the right hole in the guide to align with the workpiece. Basically, I wind out the vise until the workpiece will just fit in the jaw and then wind it out a little more until the next hole in the guide opens up and insert the pin in that hole. Works every time.

Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain Hardwood


The leg vise has some nice advantages. It can accommodate very large workpieces. It opens to at least 12 " and it can handle wide boards since the screw is down low in the vise. It is good at handling awkward shaped and large pieces since it is big and accommodates some racking. Also, it has tremendous clamping pressure and with the leather, the workpiece does not move. I can hold long boards without supports and they stay in place.

Light Water Wood Urban design Building


Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel rim Wood


On the original Moravian workbench, it appears that they only used planing stops and the vise for work holding. When Will Myers did his version, he added a custom made tail vise with dog holes along the front of the workbench. It is a real nice setup. He also added one or two holes for a holdfast which is very useful.

I decided to keep the work holding fairly simplistic on my Moravian workbench. For now, I am going to skip the tail vise option on this workbench. I have one on my other workbench and it is helpful at times, but I don't use it all that often. For years I made due with a wood screw for a stop and a holdfast or clamp. Also, I am right handed and I want to be able to saw off the end of the workbench on the right side without a vise getting in the way. I really wanted the Moravian workbench for larger scale wood preparation and carpentry, but also for the occasional joinery project. For hand tool woodworking, the main tasks that I need to accommodate are:

1. Breaking down stock with the saw.
2. Cleaning up face and edge surfaces with the plane.
3. Joinery cuts with hand planes (rabbit, groove, etc.)
4. Basic work holding for joinery tasks (dovetails, dados, etc.) and wood shaping

The main work holding devices that I have on my Moravian workbench are the leg vise, the planing stop and the holdfast. Additionally, I can use a couple appliances such as the bench hook, sticking board and clamps where needed. The holdfast comes into play quite a bit. My holdfast has an 8" reach and I laid out my holes along the back of the workbench 3" from the edge. The main holes are spaced 16" apart and I have a hole 6" from each end to help with holding work for sawing off the end. Here is the layout that I established which also accommodates the drawer which I was careful to place.

Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Circle


So far, this arrangement with the holes along the back has worked out pretty well. They are back far enough that they do not interfere with the workpiece in the bench hook. So I can use the holdfast to help clamp the work for cutting or chiseling on the bench hook. Not a huge deal, but a nice thing sometimes. Also, the holdfast can reach to about 3" from the front edge, so I have pretty good coverage for holding work to the bench top. I like to avoid too many holes in my workbench and this arrangement seems pretty reasonable without turning the top into Swiss cheese.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Table


Sawing

As I noted earlier, sawing off the end of the bench was a priority for me. The 6" hole from the end is a great help to hold the wood for cross cutting and breaking down stock.

Table Wood Hardwood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Ripping boards can be done along the front of the work bench and held with the holdfast. A couple holdfasts would be helpful for longer boards.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Shorter pieces can be ripped in the vise as well which opens up to 12".

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Art Wooden block


Smaller boards can be crosscut on the bench hook as shown earlier or in the vise as well.

Planing Stock

This workbench works great for planing boards. Face planing should really be done on the bench top, although I have seen it done in the vice as well for more modest sized pieces. For the most part I will face plane against the planing stop, moving the board as needed to keep it in place. If I need to go cross grain to flatten a wide board, I will use the holdfast to help keep it in place. The only issue is that you may need to move the holdfast around to different spots during the flattening process. Once it is flat, the holdfast can be removed and plane with the grain against the bench stop to clean it up. I will be honest and say that I don't like this kind of work all that much and I try to avoid it by obtaining good stock to begin. Then I can just clean up the surfaces to smooth them instead of working them down to dimension.

NOTE: I tried using a doe's foot or notched batten to hold the board for flattening across the grain. It really did not work very well for me because the top is only 14" wide and it left only a little room to clamp the batten at an angle with a holdfast. I think it could work if you are willing to add a bunch more holes in the top so as to find a suitable position for the holdfast, but I couldn't go there. I abandoned the idea.

Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Table Hardwood Machine


Planing the edge of boards works fine in the vise for smaller pieces.

Plant Wood Hardwood Wood stain Flooring


Planing a long, wide board works well if you rest the far end on the holdfast in the leg.

Outdoor bench Table Wood Outdoor furniture Bench


Planing a long narrow board works well using the holdfast in the leg to clamp it to the top. The 8" reach on the holdfast is helpful here.

Furniture Wood Table Outdoor furniture Wood stain


Joinery

Planing grooves and rebates are a basic need for making boxes, drawers and doors. Planing a groove in a wide board is easy against the planing stop with a holdfast. The same setup can be done for a rebate.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Table


Cutting a groove for a narrow board is a little less straight forward. It works pretty well to use a board across the planing stop to create a stop near the front of the bench. Clamping a long 2×4 with a couple holdfasts gives a fence to set the set the work against. With the work constrained, the groove can be cut without much trouble, but you can only push against the stop and then lift off to restart the cut, else the board will move back. I do not find this to be a problem at all.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Cutting a groove or rabbet in the edge of a narrow board for a cabinet door frame works pretty well in the vise if the piece is at least 2" wide to allow for the fence on the plane.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Lumber


And of course, the vise is best used for holding the work when cutting dovetails.

Table Wood Hand tool Hardwood Brush


I think that covers most of the basic workholding that I need. Every project seems to have some sort of work holding challenge if you are using hand tools, so a certain amount of ingenuity is required. I actually find that interesting. Maybe some day I will add the tail vise or add more dog holes. Time will tell…
Happy to help. There are more options as well. I should do an update one of these days. :)
 

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Simple Work Holding

I have been using the Moravian workbench for several months now. At first, I was not all that comfortable with the work holding methods, mainly because I have never used a leg vise. This was compounded by the leg vise needing to "break in" for a while. At first, it tended to be finicky moving it into position and would require nudging it with both hands. Also, I could not seem to find the best pin location for the size of the work piece and I would have to readjust. I have been using a quick release steel vise for several years which is easy to manipulate with one hand and it is very quick to move into position. By comparison, the leg vise requires a bit more manipulation and there is more stooping down to adjust. After while, the leg vise loosened up and stopped binding so that I can just wind it out to position with one hand and I got the hang of picking the right hole in the guide to align with the workpiece. Basically, I wind out the vise until the workpiece will just fit in the jaw and then wind it out a little more until the next hole in the guide opens up and insert the pin in that hole. Works every time.

Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain Hardwood


The leg vise has some nice advantages. It can accommodate very large workpieces. It opens to at least 12 " and it can handle wide boards since the screw is down low in the vise. It is good at handling awkward shaped and large pieces since it is big and accommodates some racking. Also, it has tremendous clamping pressure and with the leather, the workpiece does not move. I can hold long boards without supports and they stay in place.

Light Water Wood Urban design Building


Bicycle Wheel Tire Bicycle wheel rim Wood


On the original Moravian workbench, it appears that they only used planing stops and the vise for work holding. When Will Myers did his version, he added a custom made tail vise with dog holes along the front of the workbench. It is a real nice setup. He also added one or two holes for a holdfast which is very useful.

I decided to keep the work holding fairly simplistic on my Moravian workbench. For now, I am going to skip the tail vise option on this workbench. I have one on my other workbench and it is helpful at times, but I don't use it all that often. For years I made due with a wood screw for a stop and a holdfast or clamp. Also, I am right handed and I want to be able to saw off the end of the workbench on the right side without a vise getting in the way. I really wanted the Moravian workbench for larger scale wood preparation and carpentry, but also for the occasional joinery project. For hand tool woodworking, the main tasks that I need to accommodate are:

1. Breaking down stock with the saw.
2. Cleaning up face and edge surfaces with the plane.
3. Joinery cuts with hand planes (rabbit, groove, etc.)
4. Basic work holding for joinery tasks (dovetails, dados, etc.) and wood shaping

The main work holding devices that I have on my Moravian workbench are the leg vise, the planing stop and the holdfast. Additionally, I can use a couple appliances such as the bench hook, sticking board and clamps where needed. The holdfast comes into play quite a bit. My holdfast has an 8" reach and I laid out my holes along the back of the workbench 3" from the edge. The main holes are spaced 16" apart and I have a hole 6" from each end to help with holding work for sawing off the end. Here is the layout that I established which also accommodates the drawer which I was careful to place.

Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Circle


So far, this arrangement with the holes along the back has worked out pretty well. They are back far enough that they do not interfere with the workpiece in the bench hook. So I can use the holdfast to help clamp the work for cutting or chiseling on the bench hook. Not a huge deal, but a nice thing sometimes. Also, the holdfast can reach to about 3" from the front edge, so I have pretty good coverage for holding work to the bench top. I like to avoid too many holes in my workbench and this arrangement seems pretty reasonable without turning the top into Swiss cheese.

Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Table


Sawing

As I noted earlier, sawing off the end of the bench was a priority for me. The 6" hole from the end is a great help to hold the wood for cross cutting and breaking down stock.

Table Wood Hardwood Rectangle Outdoor furniture


Ripping boards can be done along the front of the work bench and held with the holdfast. A couple holdfasts would be helpful for longer boards.

Wood Tool Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Shorter pieces can be ripped in the vise as well which opens up to 12".

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Art Wooden block


Smaller boards can be crosscut on the bench hook as shown earlier or in the vise as well.

Planing Stock

This workbench works great for planing boards. Face planing should really be done on the bench top, although I have seen it done in the vice as well for more modest sized pieces. For the most part I will face plane against the planing stop, moving the board as needed to keep it in place. If I need to go cross grain to flatten a wide board, I will use the holdfast to help keep it in place. The only issue is that you may need to move the holdfast around to different spots during the flattening process. Once it is flat, the holdfast can be removed and plane with the grain against the bench stop to clean it up. I will be honest and say that I don't like this kind of work all that much and I try to avoid it by obtaining good stock to begin. Then I can just clean up the surfaces to smooth them instead of working them down to dimension.

NOTE: I tried using a doe's foot or notched batten to hold the board for flattening across the grain. It really did not work very well for me because the top is only 14" wide and it left only a little room to clamp the batten at an angle with a holdfast. I think it could work if you are willing to add a bunch more holes in the top so as to find a suitable position for the holdfast, but I couldn't go there. I abandoned the idea.

Wood Flooring Gas Hardwood Wood stain


Wood Tool Table Hardwood Machine


Planing the edge of boards works fine in the vise for smaller pieces.

Plant Wood Hardwood Wood stain Flooring


Planing a long, wide board works well if you rest the far end on the holdfast in the leg.

Outdoor bench Table Wood Outdoor furniture Bench


Planing a long narrow board works well using the holdfast in the leg to clamp it to the top. The 8" reach on the holdfast is helpful here.

Furniture Wood Table Outdoor furniture Wood stain


Joinery

Planing grooves and rebates are a basic need for making boxes, drawers and doors. Planing a groove in a wide board is easy against the planing stop with a holdfast. The same setup can be done for a rebate.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Table


Cutting a groove for a narrow board is a little less straight forward. It works pretty well to use a board across the planing stop to create a stop near the front of the bench. Clamping a long 2×4 with a couple holdfasts gives a fence to set the set the work against. With the work constrained, the groove can be cut without much trouble, but you can only push against the stop and then lift off to restart the cut, else the board will move back. I do not find this to be a problem at all.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Cutting a groove or rabbet in the edge of a narrow board for a cabinet door frame works pretty well in the vise if the piece is at least 2" wide to allow for the fence on the plane.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table Lumber


And of course, the vise is best used for holding the work when cutting dovetails.

Table Wood Hand tool Hardwood Brush


I think that covers most of the basic workholding that I need. Every project seems to have some sort of work holding challenge if you are using hand tools, so a certain amount of ingenuity is required. I actually find that interesting. Maybe some day I will add the tail vise or add more dog holes. Time will tell…
Thanks for these inspiring posts! I'd love to see updated photos and thoughts!
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Tool Storage

Although this Moravian workbench is meant to be portable so it can go to a job site, it also can serve as a dedicated workbench in your shop. It is incredibly sturdy and the splayed out legs really resist racking. I plan to use mine as a dedicated shop workbench, although, I may take it to a job site if I am helping friends and family with a special carpentry project. So I made the drawer and shelf so as to be removable to maintain the portability.

I am partial to keeping a set of tools at the workbench or in a tool cabinet above the bench. I am not really interested in storing tools in a chest and dragging them out every time I am working a project. On the Moravian workbench, I added the shelf and drawer for extra tool storage along with the tool well.

The saws can be hung on pegs or just a nail or screw. On my bench, I used a screw with some clear tubing to protect the handle. I hang the big saws on the back of the tool well. It is really a convenient location. They are out of the way and they are easily reached from the front of the workbench. I quickly memorized the location of each saw. There is precedent for this in old books as you can see in the picture with the saw horns shown behind the tool well marked n.

Rectangle Font Parallel Drawing Wood


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Plywood

Note the tool well can store miscellaneous items like the mallet, hammer, try squares, etc.

I can also hang miscellaneous tools off the back of the tool well such as a framing square and dust brush.

Wood Wood stain Table Hardwood Plank


The hand planes are stored below the workbench on the shelf and this is fairly convenient. Usually they hang out on the workbench top or in the well during the project and then get stashed below at the end of the day.

Brown Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


Marking tools and various small items like the auger bits and files go in the drawer. Again, they come out during the project and end up in the well, but they can be put away when the work is complete.

Wood Automotive exterior Air gun Trigger Shotgun


The far end of the tool well is a nice place to store the bench chisels, amongst other things. A chisel tray can help corral the tools similar to what Paul Sellers advocates.

Wood Wood stain Floor Hardwood Paint brush


And you can hang various things such as clamps and holdfast off of the leg assemblies.

Wood Table Flooring Floor Wood stain


There is still plenty of room for more tools, but this covers most of my needs. A plow plane and fillister plane can be stored on the shelf if needed. It is a comfortable setup for me.

And yes, I cleaned up the debris before I took the photos. Usually there is a lot of saw dust and shavings hanging around. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Finishing Touches and a Close Call

This will be the final installment, Lucky 13. I added a few finishing touches including a dust ramp, an iron ring pull for the drawer and a custom holdfast.

I made the dust ramp from a piece of straight grained oak firewood. This is more of a nice to have, especially if you worry about debris in your tool well. I find it to be a nice convenience.

Table Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Font Flooring


Rectangle Wood Table Flooring Wood stain


Wheel Wood Bicycle tire Tire Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Next I had a custom iron ring pull and holdfast made for the workbench by Eric Dennis at Roundhouse Blacksmith. He does really nice work.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Roundhouseblacksmith

Eric also made the custom iron planing stop. The iron ring pull is attached with a sort of snipe bill pin and clinched on the inside of the drawer.

Brown Wood Rectangle Material property Wood stain


Table Wood Wood stain Tool Hardwood


Table Wood Tool Wood stain Workbench


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Plank


Wood Rectangle Table Hardwood Wood stain


The holdfast has an 8" reach to match up with my dog hole layout that was mentioned in my previous blog on workholding. It is made from 11/16" diameter stock and it works perfectly in 3/4" holes in the thick bench top. It also has a long shaft so I can hold big workpieces. The design is really more toward the French style and shape. I particularly like that it releases with just a quick tap. I find that some other holdfasts need 2 or 3 taps with the mallet to release.

Wood Office ruler Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


Table Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


That completes my work on a traditional Moravian workbench. I have been using it for several months now and it is really a nice solid workbench that can serve your needs for hand tools or power tools. And if you have to change homes or move apartments, it breaks down in just a minute or two and you can take to your new abode in the back of your car or truck.

The last interesting tidbit is that we had an incident at my home. Our neighbors house burned down recently. We were lucky that our home had only minor damage. I currently keep my workbench in a sort of garage / storage shed with my wood until I build a dedicated shop someday. The garage was much closer to the burning house. During the fire, I was quite sure that the garage would burn down and I would lose my workbench. It was more of a passing thought at the time because I was more worried about my house. Fortunately, the wind was in our favor and the garage and my workbench survive. In the end, I feel lucky with the outcome, but it was quite an experience!

Cloud Plant Sky Building Tree


Thanks for following along and take care!
 

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1,528 Posts
Finishing Touches and a Close Call

This will be the final installment, Lucky 13. I added a few finishing touches including a dust ramp, an iron ring pull for the drawer and a custom holdfast.

I made the dust ramp from a piece of straight grained oak firewood. This is more of a nice to have, especially if you worry about debris in your tool well. I find it to be a nice convenience.

Table Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Font Flooring


Rectangle Wood Table Flooring Wood stain


Wheel Wood Bicycle tire Tire Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Next I had a custom iron ring pull and holdfast made for the workbench by Eric Dennis at Roundhouse Blacksmith. He does really nice work.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Roundhouseblacksmith

Eric also made the custom iron planing stop. The iron ring pull is attached with a sort of snipe bill pin and clinched on the inside of the drawer.

Brown Wood Rectangle Material property Wood stain


Table Wood Wood stain Tool Hardwood


Table Wood Tool Wood stain Workbench


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Plank


Wood Rectangle Table Hardwood Wood stain


The holdfast has an 8" reach to match up with my dog hole layout that was mentioned in my previous blog on workholding. It is made from 11/16" diameter stock and it works perfectly in 3/4" holes in the thick bench top. It also has a long shaft so I can hold big workpieces. The design is really more toward the French style and shape. I particularly like that it releases with just a quick tap. I find that some other holdfasts need 2 or 3 taps with the mallet to release.

Wood Office ruler Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


Table Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


That completes my work on a traditional Moravian workbench. I have been using it for several months now and it is really a nice solid workbench that can serve your needs for hand tools or power tools. And if you have to change homes or move apartments, it breaks down in just a minute or two and you can take to your new abode in the back of your car or truck.

The last interesting tidbit is that we had an incident at my home. Our neighbors house burned down recently. We were lucky that our home had only minor damage. I currently keep my workbench in a sort of garage / storage shed with my wood until I build a dedicated shop someday. The garage was much closer to the burning house. During the fire, I was quite sure that the garage would burn down and I would lose my workbench. It was more of a passing thought at the time because I was more worried about my house. Fortunately, the wind was in our favor and the garage and my workbench survive. In the end, I feel lucky with the outcome, but it was quite an experience!

Cloud Plant Sky Building Tree


Thanks for following along and take care!
Sexy looking bench. Glad ur building survived too. I hate that for your neighbors tho. You loose so much that you'll never get back in a fire
 

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4,324 Posts
Finishing Touches and a Close Call

This will be the final installment, Lucky 13. I added a few finishing touches including a dust ramp, an iron ring pull for the drawer and a custom holdfast.

I made the dust ramp from a piece of straight grained oak firewood. This is more of a nice to have, especially if you worry about debris in your tool well. I find it to be a nice convenience.

Table Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Font Flooring


Rectangle Wood Table Flooring Wood stain


Wheel Wood Bicycle tire Tire Wood stain


Wood Rectangle Wood stain Flooring Hardwood


Next I had a custom iron ring pull and holdfast made for the workbench by Eric Dennis at Roundhouse Blacksmith. He does really nice work.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Roundhouseblacksmith

Eric also made the custom iron planing stop. The iron ring pull is attached with a sort of snipe bill pin and clinched on the inside of the drawer.

Brown Wood Rectangle Material property Wood stain


Table Wood Wood stain Tool Hardwood


Table Wood Tool Wood stain Workbench


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Plank


Wood Rectangle Table Hardwood Wood stain


The holdfast has an 8" reach to match up with my dog hole layout that was mentioned in my previous blog on workholding. It is made from 11/16" diameter stock and it works perfectly in 3/4" holes in the thick bench top. It also has a long shaft so I can hold big workpieces. The design is really more toward the French style and shape. I particularly like that it releases with just a quick tap. I find that some other holdfasts need 2 or 3 taps with the mallet to release.

Wood Office ruler Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


Table Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


That completes my work on a traditional Moravian workbench. I have been using it for several months now and it is really a nice solid workbench that can serve your needs for hand tools or power tools. And if you have to change homes or move apartments, it breaks down in just a minute or two and you can take to your new abode in the back of your car or truck.

The last interesting tidbit is that we had an incident at my home. Our neighbors house burned down recently. We were lucky that our home had only minor damage. I currently keep my workbench in a sort of garage / storage shed with my wood until I build a dedicated shop someday. The garage was much closer to the burning house. During the fire, I was quite sure that the garage would burn down and I would lose my workbench. It was more of a passing thought at the time because I was more worried about my house. Fortunately, the wind was in our favor and the garage and my workbench survive. In the end, I feel lucky with the outcome, but it was quite an experience!

Cloud Plant Sky Building Tree


Thanks for following along and take care!
Are you sure you actually built anything?
Looks like the invisible man hard at work and did it all for you. ...tee hee.

Next tool run add to the list:-
buy a longer garden hose.
 

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