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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2.5 inch slab of pecan I want to make a 10" deep, 7' long shelf with. Going inside my house. Slab was kiln dried to 9% (according to the guy that sold it to me) but is at 15% now. Am I good to use it with this much moisture still inside? No joinery, just some finish one it, likely stain. Just a solid piece of 2" thick wood with some 1/2" thick rod going thru it as floating shelf brackets.
 

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15% seems a little high for interior use, but you will probably be ok since you are not joining the slab to anything other than a steel rod. I think ideally you want it between 6% and 9% for interior use. How long have you had it inside your house? Have you given it a month or 2 inside your house to acclimate and see if it will move any?

You might consider resawing it into thick (~1/16 - 1/8") veneer, making a torsion box for the shelf (plywood or MDF), and applying the pecan to the torsion box. This would give you the same/similar look, it would likely be lighter, and wood movement would likely be a non-issue.
 

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Take some moisture readings of other wood inside your house to get a better idea of what it is going to acclimate to. Moisture test some of the wood in your shop that has been there for a while. This will give you a better idea of where to put it to acclimate if necessary.
 

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I have a 2.5 inch slab of pecan I want to make a 10" deep, 7' long shelf with. Going inside my house. Slab was kiln dried to 9% (according to the guy that sold it to me) but is at 15% now. Am I good to use it with this much moisture still inside? No joinery, just some finish one it, likely stain. Just a solid piece of 2" thick wood with some 1/2" thick rod going thru it as floating shelf brackets.
I have some cherry that has been sitting in my shop for 5 years. Just for the heck of it I measured it at 12%. I wrote on it 5 years ago that it was measured at 15%. This didn't seem right to me so I looked in the manual for settings. I found a recalibration procedure. I ran the procedure and remeasured the cherry at the expected 8 to 9 percent. Maybe you just have to calibrate your meter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for the responses. Unfortunately i don't have capacity to resaw one this big but that is a good idea. This is a piece that has been in my shop for about 6 months. My meter is brand new and wasn't calibrated, I just took it out of the box and went to poking wood with it. Everything in my shop is reading higher than what I thought it should so calibration is likely needed. I will also check some of the stuff in the house to see what it is at once calibrated.
 

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For a shelf I wouldn’t be concerned at all . If its not horribly bowed cupped or twisted now it doesn’t have enough moisture in it to changed that much. I can’t imagine it will affect the finish at all.
I don’t understand what you guys are tripping on
Good Luck
 

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15% moisture isn't even at EMC for air drying lumber outside let alone inside. It'll take about a full seasonal cycle indoors at 70 degrees and 30-50% seasonal humidity before that 2.5" thick slab finally gets close to EMC and settles down and quits moving on you. Just remember, wood is a slow moving sponge that wants to reach equilibrium with its environment. If you take KD wood that is 6-8% and put it out in your nonheated/climate controlled garage, it will swell right back up to 11-13%.
 
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