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I'll bite….

I'm not sure why you would want to.
What 'control' are you speaking of? and what 'quick buildup' of lacquer are you referring to?

I can spray or brush lacquer about as thin as watered down water and rub poly doesn't add much to that.

Lacquer layers will melt into the layer before to make a stronger bond. Poly on top of lacquer will not soak in or blend with the lacquer so you will end up with two discrete layers of finish.

It wouldn't be so bad, but no finish that I have found is impervious to water infitration. Some is just easier to repair than others.

I dunno if that helped or not, I just wouldn't do it.
 

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I don't see an advantage to including poly in the finishing schedule. Spraying lacquer offers good control and will build a nice finish in two coats. Wet sand the top coat with a 1500 grit soft sponge. On medium sized projects such as desks and coffee tables, wet sanding takes about 15 minutes.
Good luck with whatever finish you choose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
By rubbing poly I mean wipe-on poly. sorry.

The idea was to get a fast build with the faster drying lacquer. The lacquer I was spraying wasn't laying down well so I did a sample topcoat of wipe on poly to get the smooth control I was hoping for.

To solve my problem I thinned the lacquer and sprayed a fresh fully wet coat. That seemed to fix it! Finishing in the dead of winter is terrible. Wish I can have warmer temps and the garage door wide open!
 
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