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I have painted my kitchen cabinets. I wanted a flat look to them so I used a primer and flat based paint. Over time the paint chipped and peeled so I had to sand, re-prime, re-paint and seal. I tried to find a flat based sealant but could not find one. I wound up using Minwax Polycrylic to seal them. I have done my cabinets in stages. During my current stage I finished the back side of some cabinet doors. I flipped them over to do the front side, primed and painted them and decided to hang them to finish the poly portion while they were hung. They are up against the base of the cabinet that has already had all coats done and several weeks dried already. I have two coats of poly on the doors and up against the base the doors look very flat and the base and all other cabinets, doors and drawers are glossy. The new doors are dry to the touch but not cured even a couple of hours yet. Will they get glossier over time? I guess I'll find out in the morning but wondered if I could get any feedback sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I used clear satin. It was the flattest finish I could find. I used the same gallon from the beginning to the end. In going over my whole process again I'm thinking that I may not have stirred the gallon towards the end. Thinking the flat portion of the stain fell to the bottom ???? I DO NOT want a shiny finish and would rather have it dull. Do you know of any sealant I could buy that will give me the protection I need without the shine?
 

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The sheen won't change once it's dry to the touch. You may be very correct about not stirring the can. Often the "flattening agent" is something like talcum powder. Which will settle to the bottom.

If you need to strip and sand the stuff at least sands off fairly easily.
 

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Once it's all cured, you can use steel wool and paste wax to even out the sheen on the differing pieces. I've used steel wool & wax on polycrylic and it will leave a nice satin finish. If it's too satin for you, you can buff it out more.
 

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Sorry Ed
But I would not use steel wool on water base finishes if you need to re-coat tons of little rust spot will be in your top coat. I agree with stirring well and trying a re-coat. If that doesn't work then do a quick light sanding with 400-600 grit,that will knock you sheen down,this should only take a short time because your only sanding almost as if your wiping dust off your cabinet.
 

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Thanks for the link, Jim, I didn't know they made such a thing. The 0000 synthetic wool package says it doesn't shred or splinter. Have you used it much, and if so, is this true? The only annoying thing to me about actual steel wool is the shredding/splintering.
 

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Yes Ed I've used it,it works fine much better than steel wool because of the shredding aspect and it does not leave steel particles on water born finishes. For the most part I think I prefer sand paper over steel or synthetic wool,but if you prefer steel wool then synthetic is a good alternative .
 
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