LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,989 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
So far , so good …keep it coming : )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,760 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
well done , sharon ,

and lesson learned and conveyed ,

thanks .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,894 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
Hi Sharon,

Nice work! If I needed to glue up these triangles, I would approach it the same way we make mitered posts. Lay the pieces to be glued together, edge to edge, on blue painters tape. Brush on the glue, and pull the pieces together with the blue tape.

I did a blog on this method a couple years ago. I hope this helps you out.

http://lumberjocks.com/LeeJ/blog/4775

Very cool sketch up work.

Lee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
Thanks Lee… now I DID glue up mitered posts before with blue tape… not sure why I didn't use it this time around - would make the alignment nightmare go away :)... next time I'll have to remember
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
Sharon I actually bought clamps for gluing two 45's together.
They were a bit expensive, but they are handy to have.
I posted a review-

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/874

They work perfect. No slipping and sliding, dead on glue ups.

Lisa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
sweet Lisa- thats exactly what I was thinking about - didn't know it's commecrially available (although - why wouldn't it). I was thinking about making wooden version of the clamp faces that will fit on a regular clamp.

those miters on your post look so good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,175 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
Thanks for sharing this. The next time I screw up will probably be tomorrow… If we all did it right the first time no one would bother trying new things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
Thanks Sharon.
I had forgotten about these, I will have to dig them out and do a board.
Thanks for bringing up the topic.
And thanks for the sketch up TIP : )

Lisa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
True that Jack - what I like about woodworking - is that even when (and you do) screw up, you can move on, and that imperfection becomes a perfect one of a kinda product.

for what it's worth - I like to aim for perfection, but I am well aware it is nothing but the light the guides us through - the end result, is somewhat different at times.

Lisa- you are welcome. I'll probably try to come up with something at some point and post my doings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
Sharon:

Thanks for the tour and thought process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
My pleasure Karson
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
I recognise the ends of those triangles, lol. Takes me back to the snakes board!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118,619 Posts
Milling S3S ...yes, triangles.

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

In Highschool I always doodled (I still am). and one of my favorite things was to use the squares on the math papers to form different geometries - mostly with triangles. as I was playing along, I discovered that I could form a star of david (Magen David) and that formation has stuck with me ever since.

When I was introduced to the idea of making cutting boards out of wood, I always wanted to incorporate my sketches and designs into that.

I finally got a chance to put my ideas into motion, and came up with the following design in SketchUp:


SketchUp TIP: Using components you can quickly see how many of a certain component you have in the model by selecting the component. In the Entity Info, it'll clearly show you that the selected item is a component, and will also show you how many of that such components are in the model.

Using the above model, and the above Tip, I was quickly able to tell that I needed 80 mitered cubes, and 60 regular cubes to make the board. Now it was just a matter of getting it milled.

I figured since the board is mirrored left<->right, I could make strips for half a board twice as thick, and prior to final glue up rip them in half to quicken things up and make alignment easier.

This is where the trouble started :).

All the lumber that I have consists of cutoffs and shorts that were left over from a shop that closed, and since I wanted to get the largest possible geometry, my options were rather limited. I did not have full width boards that I could easily bevel rip to size, but had narrow boards that I could only bevel rip in the middle - with the hopes of using both parts - I was that limited with lumber….yeah.

My next mistake was approaching this project with automation, and mass production in mind. instead of making many small and clean triangles and glueing them one at a time, I figured I could created long beveled glue ups and quicken the creation of the triangles geometries. looking back - considering my source of lumber, I should have cut a massive amount of perfectly shaped triangles and with patience glue them one at a time.

So, after jointing and planing all the lumber I had could yield squares larger than 1" I bevel ripped them to get the triangles. I left a bit extra width on both sides (as much as I could) as I knew those rips would not be clean and will be in need of a cleanup:



Next was the attempt for cleanup. I made the following sled for the planer which would hold the parts at 45 to plane the top flat while still keeping the essential 45 angle:





As you can see, I was focusing on making things fast, dirty, but efficient. unfortunately this was more dirty and fast than efficient as the lack of full support for the parts made the planer lift the parts as they passed the 2nd roller. so my cleaned and flat planed parts - were not so clean, not so flat, and well … not so so.

All aside, and for lack of any additional lumber suitable for this, I decided to move forward and attend any parts that require it as they call for it. I glued up the beveled strips and got this material that I will work with:



Lessons learned:
  • Do not Mass Produce a One-Of design - not until you are actually mass producing them :)
  • Planer sled should have full base support - I will update my sled to accommodate for that.
  • Glueing up beveled strips requires a lot of patience, self control - OR - a set of precut cauls that would hold the parts at the set angle - I didn't have such, and had to rely on patience and self control - good thing I have those at hand, but for future use - I'll make myself some guides.

Next up, Super Cuts!
That's a wonderful a design and a great approach. Look forward to the rest of the story Sharon keep up the good work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Shave and a Cut - Cross Cut that is

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

At this point (see previous post for the methodology I chose to take for this project) , I realized that my plan for mass production, and gluing the long strips to one another to make the geometry would cause more trouble, and decided to cross cut them all to their final thickness instead, and in a way changed my work order to a 'one of' setup, albeit it would have been better if I did that to begin with as it would yield far better material to work with at this point - but, this is woodworking, and no perfect picture is needed (at least to me).

So we have the beveled strips, and some 1 maple and 1 cherry squared strip. I was hoping to make a thick a$& board, but looking at the available material at hand - a compromise is in order. so I made some calculations to see how thick I could make the blocks to yield me with 80 beveled squares, and 60 regulars - the results were in and the thickness was 1-3/8"

Tool Gloat Moment: I was planning on making a cross cut sled for a very long time. my plan was to get the aluminum extrusion that is used for the Incra Miter Express which houses your miter gauge and build a sled around that. this is great since you use your miter gauge for all the angles and don't need much more to it. As it turned out, I Just scored an Incra Express on craigslist for less than I would have paid for just the extrusion part itself. and for the time being I don't even have to build the larger sled as I'll just use the thing as is till I need something bigger.

So. I set my cross cut sled on, and clamp a block of wood on the opposite side of the blade with a hand screw clamp to make the offcuts 1-3/8".

The block of wood (stop) is a 2×4 and is located ahead of the blade. When I slide the sled backwards, I can quickly reposition the strip of wood to be cut by butting it against the stop, and pushing the sled through to make the cut - rinse and repeat:



this was a long process to make all 140 cubes, and gets boring after the first….mmm… 3 cuts :) however since this was the first time I was using a sled, and the cuts were being made so rapidly, this was kinda fun and meditating.

the results? 140 cubes, 80 beveled, 60 regular:



You can see the fuzz on the blocks - I wasn't using a backer board on the miter fence, and this is the result. my bad. I was so excited to get shop time and I just wanted to build something. oh well :) good thing it was fun.

My original design had beveled cubes, and all maple regular cubes:



For lack of material, I didn't have enough regular maple cubes, and had to supplement the board with cherry cubes. this called in some design changes on the fly, and while at it, as I was moving cubes around, I found that not only can I get the star of david - but by flipping over some beveled cubes I could also get the 2 lines that together with the star of david make up the Israeli Flag :)



So here lies the somewhat roughly cut material I will be working with to make the board:



Next? GlueUps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,784 Posts
Shave and a Cut - Cross Cut that is

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

At this point (see previous post for the methodology I chose to take for this project) , I realized that my plan for mass production, and gluing the long strips to one another to make the geometry would cause more trouble, and decided to cross cut them all to their final thickness instead, and in a way changed my work order to a 'one of' setup, albeit it would have been better if I did that to begin with as it would yield far better material to work with at this point - but, this is woodworking, and no perfect picture is needed (at least to me).

So we have the beveled strips, and some 1 maple and 1 cherry squared strip. I was hoping to make a thick a$& board, but looking at the available material at hand - a compromise is in order. so I made some calculations to see how thick I could make the blocks to yield me with 80 beveled squares, and 60 regulars - the results were in and the thickness was 1-3/8"

Tool Gloat Moment: I was planning on making a cross cut sled for a very long time. my plan was to get the aluminum extrusion that is used for the Incra Miter Express which houses your miter gauge and build a sled around that. this is great since you use your miter gauge for all the angles and don't need much more to it. As it turned out, I Just scored an Incra Express on craigslist for less than I would have paid for just the extrusion part itself. and for the time being I don't even have to build the larger sled as I'll just use the thing as is till I need something bigger.

So. I set my cross cut sled on, and clamp a block of wood on the opposite side of the blade with a hand screw clamp to make the offcuts 1-3/8".

The block of wood (stop) is a 2×4 and is located ahead of the blade. When I slide the sled backwards, I can quickly reposition the strip of wood to be cut by butting it against the stop, and pushing the sled through to make the cut - rinse and repeat:



this was a long process to make all 140 cubes, and gets boring after the first….mmm… 3 cuts :) however since this was the first time I was using a sled, and the cuts were being made so rapidly, this was kinda fun and meditating.

the results? 140 cubes, 80 beveled, 60 regular:



You can see the fuzz on the blocks - I wasn't using a backer board on the miter fence, and this is the result. my bad. I was so excited to get shop time and I just wanted to build something. oh well :) good thing it was fun.

My original design had beveled cubes, and all maple regular cubes:



For lack of material, I didn't have enough regular maple cubes, and had to supplement the board with cherry cubes. this called in some design changes on the fly, and while at it, as I was moving cubes around, I found that not only can I get the star of david - but by flipping over some beveled cubes I could also get the 2 lines that together with the star of david make up the Israeli Flag :)



So here lies the somewhat roughly cut material I will be working with to make the board:



Next? GlueUps!
Eureka! I finally see it. Sharon, until just now I was not seeing the star of David in the finished product. Remember those illusion paintings/drawings that were popular years ago? You had to stare at it blankly for awhile before the 3D image would appear to your eyes? (Think Elaine and Mr. Pitt of Seinfeld.) That's what this was like for me but now I see it. Well done!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Shave and a Cut - Cross Cut that is

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

At this point (see previous post for the methodology I chose to take for this project) , I realized that my plan for mass production, and gluing the long strips to one another to make the geometry would cause more trouble, and decided to cross cut them all to their final thickness instead, and in a way changed my work order to a 'one of' setup, albeit it would have been better if I did that to begin with as it would yield far better material to work with at this point - but, this is woodworking, and no perfect picture is needed (at least to me).

So we have the beveled strips, and some 1 maple and 1 cherry squared strip. I was hoping to make a thick a$& board, but looking at the available material at hand - a compromise is in order. so I made some calculations to see how thick I could make the blocks to yield me with 80 beveled squares, and 60 regulars - the results were in and the thickness was 1-3/8"

Tool Gloat Moment: I was planning on making a cross cut sled for a very long time. my plan was to get the aluminum extrusion that is used for the Incra Miter Express which houses your miter gauge and build a sled around that. this is great since you use your miter gauge for all the angles and don't need much more to it. As it turned out, I Just scored an Incra Express on craigslist for less than I would have paid for just the extrusion part itself. and for the time being I don't even have to build the larger sled as I'll just use the thing as is till I need something bigger.

So. I set my cross cut sled on, and clamp a block of wood on the opposite side of the blade with a hand screw clamp to make the offcuts 1-3/8".

The block of wood (stop) is a 2×4 and is located ahead of the blade. When I slide the sled backwards, I can quickly reposition the strip of wood to be cut by butting it against the stop, and pushing the sled through to make the cut - rinse and repeat:



this was a long process to make all 140 cubes, and gets boring after the first….mmm… 3 cuts :) however since this was the first time I was using a sled, and the cuts were being made so rapidly, this was kinda fun and meditating.

the results? 140 cubes, 80 beveled, 60 regular:



You can see the fuzz on the blocks - I wasn't using a backer board on the miter fence, and this is the result. my bad. I was so excited to get shop time and I just wanted to build something. oh well :) good thing it was fun.

My original design had beveled cubes, and all maple regular cubes:



For lack of material, I didn't have enough regular maple cubes, and had to supplement the board with cherry cubes. this called in some design changes on the fly, and while at it, as I was moving cubes around, I found that not only can I get the star of david - but by flipping over some beveled cubes I could also get the 2 lines that together with the star of david make up the Israeli Flag :)



So here lies the somewhat roughly cut material I will be working with to make the board:



Next? GlueUps!
Very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Shave and a Cut - Cross Cut that is

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

At this point (see previous post for the methodology I chose to take for this project) , I realized that my plan for mass production, and gluing the long strips to one another to make the geometry would cause more trouble, and decided to cross cut them all to their final thickness instead, and in a way changed my work order to a 'one of' setup, albeit it would have been better if I did that to begin with as it would yield far better material to work with at this point - but, this is woodworking, and no perfect picture is needed (at least to me).

So we have the beveled strips, and some 1 maple and 1 cherry squared strip. I was hoping to make a thick a$& board, but looking at the available material at hand - a compromise is in order. so I made some calculations to see how thick I could make the blocks to yield me with 80 beveled squares, and 60 regulars - the results were in and the thickness was 1-3/8"

Tool Gloat Moment: I was planning on making a cross cut sled for a very long time. my plan was to get the aluminum extrusion that is used for the Incra Miter Express which houses your miter gauge and build a sled around that. this is great since you use your miter gauge for all the angles and don't need much more to it. As it turned out, I Just scored an Incra Express on craigslist for less than I would have paid for just the extrusion part itself. and for the time being I don't even have to build the larger sled as I'll just use the thing as is till I need something bigger.

So. I set my cross cut sled on, and clamp a block of wood on the opposite side of the blade with a hand screw clamp to make the offcuts 1-3/8".

The block of wood (stop) is a 2×4 and is located ahead of the blade. When I slide the sled backwards, I can quickly reposition the strip of wood to be cut by butting it against the stop, and pushing the sled through to make the cut - rinse and repeat:



this was a long process to make all 140 cubes, and gets boring after the first….mmm… 3 cuts :) however since this was the first time I was using a sled, and the cuts were being made so rapidly, this was kinda fun and meditating.

the results? 140 cubes, 80 beveled, 60 regular:



You can see the fuzz on the blocks - I wasn't using a backer board on the miter fence, and this is the result. my bad. I was so excited to get shop time and I just wanted to build something. oh well :) good thing it was fun.

My original design had beveled cubes, and all maple regular cubes:



For lack of material, I didn't have enough regular maple cubes, and had to supplement the board with cherry cubes. this called in some design changes on the fly, and while at it, as I was moving cubes around, I found that not only can I get the star of david - but by flipping over some beveled cubes I could also get the 2 lines that together with the star of david make up the Israeli Flag :)



So here lies the somewhat roughly cut material I will be working with to make the board:



Next? GlueUps!
haha, Lenny - this is a very subtle image and does not jump out of the board in flying colors - I still can't see it at times :) especially now with the finish - the maple end grain became very dark almost as dark as the cherry. in time though, I'm hoping the cherry to darken more than the maple to make the image more visible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,615 Posts
Shave and a Cut - Cross Cut that is

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

At this point (see previous post for the methodology I chose to take for this project) , I realized that my plan for mass production, and gluing the long strips to one another to make the geometry would cause more trouble, and decided to cross cut them all to their final thickness instead, and in a way changed my work order to a 'one of' setup, albeit it would have been better if I did that to begin with as it would yield far better material to work with at this point - but, this is woodworking, and no perfect picture is needed (at least to me).

So we have the beveled strips, and some 1 maple and 1 cherry squared strip. I was hoping to make a thick a$& board, but looking at the available material at hand - a compromise is in order. so I made some calculations to see how thick I could make the blocks to yield me with 80 beveled squares, and 60 regulars - the results were in and the thickness was 1-3/8"

Tool Gloat Moment: I was planning on making a cross cut sled for a very long time. my plan was to get the aluminum extrusion that is used for the Incra Miter Express which houses your miter gauge and build a sled around that. this is great since you use your miter gauge for all the angles and don't need much more to it. As it turned out, I Just scored an Incra Express on craigslist for less than I would have paid for just the extrusion part itself. and for the time being I don't even have to build the larger sled as I'll just use the thing as is till I need something bigger.

So. I set my cross cut sled on, and clamp a block of wood on the opposite side of the blade with a hand screw clamp to make the offcuts 1-3/8".

The block of wood (stop) is a 2×4 and is located ahead of the blade. When I slide the sled backwards, I can quickly reposition the strip of wood to be cut by butting it against the stop, and pushing the sled through to make the cut - rinse and repeat:



this was a long process to make all 140 cubes, and gets boring after the first….mmm… 3 cuts :) however since this was the first time I was using a sled, and the cuts were being made so rapidly, this was kinda fun and meditating.

the results? 140 cubes, 80 beveled, 60 regular:



You can see the fuzz on the blocks - I wasn't using a backer board on the miter fence, and this is the result. my bad. I was so excited to get shop time and I just wanted to build something. oh well :) good thing it was fun.

My original design had beveled cubes, and all maple regular cubes:



For lack of material, I didn't have enough regular maple cubes, and had to supplement the board with cherry cubes. this called in some design changes on the fly, and while at it, as I was moving cubes around, I found that not only can I get the star of david - but by flipping over some beveled cubes I could also get the 2 lines that together with the star of david make up the Israeli Flag :)



So here lies the somewhat roughly cut material I will be working with to make the board:



Next? GlueUps!
Oh the glue-ups, the glue-ups, nightmares even now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Shave and a Cut - Cross Cut that is

Disclaimer: This blog follows my Magen David Board that is already finished and posted here

At this point (see previous post for the methodology I chose to take for this project) , I realized that my plan for mass production, and gluing the long strips to one another to make the geometry would cause more trouble, and decided to cross cut them all to their final thickness instead, and in a way changed my work order to a 'one of' setup, albeit it would have been better if I did that to begin with as it would yield far better material to work with at this point - but, this is woodworking, and no perfect picture is needed (at least to me).

So we have the beveled strips, and some 1 maple and 1 cherry squared strip. I was hoping to make a thick a$& board, but looking at the available material at hand - a compromise is in order. so I made some calculations to see how thick I could make the blocks to yield me with 80 beveled squares, and 60 regulars - the results were in and the thickness was 1-3/8"

Tool Gloat Moment: I was planning on making a cross cut sled for a very long time. my plan was to get the aluminum extrusion that is used for the Incra Miter Express which houses your miter gauge and build a sled around that. this is great since you use your miter gauge for all the angles and don't need much more to it. As it turned out, I Just scored an Incra Express on craigslist for less than I would have paid for just the extrusion part itself. and for the time being I don't even have to build the larger sled as I'll just use the thing as is till I need something bigger.

So. I set my cross cut sled on, and clamp a block of wood on the opposite side of the blade with a hand screw clamp to make the offcuts 1-3/8".

The block of wood (stop) is a 2×4 and is located ahead of the blade. When I slide the sled backwards, I can quickly reposition the strip of wood to be cut by butting it against the stop, and pushing the sled through to make the cut - rinse and repeat:



this was a long process to make all 140 cubes, and gets boring after the first….mmm… 3 cuts :) however since this was the first time I was using a sled, and the cuts were being made so rapidly, this was kinda fun and meditating.

the results? 140 cubes, 80 beveled, 60 regular:



You can see the fuzz on the blocks - I wasn't using a backer board on the miter fence, and this is the result. my bad. I was so excited to get shop time and I just wanted to build something. oh well :) good thing it was fun.

My original design had beveled cubes, and all maple regular cubes:



For lack of material, I didn't have enough regular maple cubes, and had to supplement the board with cherry cubes. this called in some design changes on the fly, and while at it, as I was moving cubes around, I found that not only can I get the star of david - but by flipping over some beveled cubes I could also get the 2 lines that together with the star of david make up the Israeli Flag :)



So here lies the somewhat roughly cut material I will be working with to make the board:



Next? GlueUps!
hehe, I am still trying to recover from it mentally.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top