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I am starting to collect the 750 sweetheart chisels. I figure at $35-$40 each, i can buy one here, one there, one for father day and finally get a decent "suite" of hand tools.

I am sure that I don't want to use an old framing hammer for this and am looking at either the round type of a turned mallet.

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or this square looking one

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Question is i hear the round give you more control so am interested in that. But I do not own anything to turn something like that one so wondering if anyone has any ideas past going out a buys some new tools. I am working on starting a bit of workshop so trying to save up for the important things like a jointer, planer or drill press before a lathe and stuff.

Any thoughts on which one is a better for a begineer and ideas on how to make them could be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for understanding that while really interested in this and have some experience, i am not in the best shape with machinery for the woodshop

your total noob woodworking friend

Chris J
 

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I've never used either of those mallets but I do have a few of the sweetheart chisels and I use the mallet pictured above. I bought it at harbor freight for a few dollars and it has worked great. I mainly use the yellow side which is a harder plastic whereas the black side is a slightly softer rubber. It's heavy enough to do mortice work yet light enough to use all day.
 

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I like paring (with grain) with a round mallet like the first one and I like chopping (across grain) with a rectangular mallet like the second one. The round one I have is a green urethane one and it works fine. I like the weight. The second one is a somewhat unwieldy Crown mallet. I am planning on making a smaller squarish mallet from heavy wood or with brass rods pinned through the mallet head to add heft.
 

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I have the round urethane "wood is good" mallet (their smallest size), and it works great for most every chiseling task. I just made an even-smaller mallet this evening from russian olive, we'll see how it works once the finish dries.
 

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Good luck with the 750 sweet hearts, I just picked up a 1/8" in new condition $100.00.
I usually use a round brass one from Lee Valley, only light taps would never use them
for a mortise, got some old beaters and a full set of Narex for that!
 

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Good luck with the 750 sweet hearts, I just picked up a 1/8" in new condition $100.00.
I usually use a round brass one from Lee Valley, only light taps would never use them
for a mortise, got some old beaters and a full set of Narex for that!

- rad457
Am I missing something?

Isn't a 1/8" Stanley 750 less than $30 new?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Jtm. I'm in Canada and everything is more expensive here. It was actually 33.50.

Thanks for the comments. I'm thinking of getting the lee valley now with the brass head or maybe one with the rubber coating
 

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Chris, I think you'll quickly get used to either style. Weight and balance is a bigger deal. Suggest you make a simple (square) mallet and see how you like it in that regard. Easy to do, lots of examples here on LJs (search Mallet Seap).
 

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What are the handles of the Sweethearts made of? Hornbeam can take quite a beating. I want happy with my current mallet, so I ordered the large journeyman mallet from Lee Valley. Hard to be at $30. It should arrive tomorrow, so I'll let you know how I like it. Might write a blog review.
 

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I went to the Port Townsend woodworking school for a haircut dovetail class. Great experience. They use Back Channel mallets (smaller ones) and I really liked the size and heft. I may get one because my mallet making plans are on hold as I have too many projects in various stages of disarray. DiLegno sells them.

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If you want to make a round mallet but don't have a lathe, how about making one like this with a domed head? Domed head one one side gives you a nice forgiving strike surface, while the squared surface on the other can get into corners.
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Making a mallet is a great early project. You don't have a lathe.

Survey says….....

Make your own square headed mallet. Add some fun stuff to it. On mine I inlaid a saw blade thick strip of walnut, and chamfered the corners. The grain of the birch head is oriented wrong, (end grain should be the impact surface) but it's the piece I had. I used it. It is still in service two years later.

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Not a close up, but an image containing the mallet. Not a phenomenal, stop the world type of project, but one I still have and use.
 

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I have around urethane mallet and it's great for general bench work. Really good for setting hold fasts. My square face wood mallet takes the impression of the steel hold fast if I use it to set them. I like the sq face wood for mortise get and the round for paring type chisel work.
 
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