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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #101 ·
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Thaks for the comments everyone!

Paul - Likewise, I have learned a lot from what you have shared. I just went bkc and checked - My first post on this blog will be a year old in a few days!

Rand - Stay tuned, I am still behind on the blog and will try to get another entry out soon.

Steve - Thanks - Problem solving is definitely a fun part of woodworking.I had thought about the pipe clamp solution, but all I have is bar clamps that don't come apart.

Lew - This is the second time I have kept track of hours. The first time I put in about twice as many hours as I had guessed. It is interesting - 108 hours seems like a lokng time, but 18 hours per stool feels pretty good!

Larry - I had tried a chair when I was young - it was pretty wobbly and not much to look at. Gave me a lot of respect for those who make them. I spent a lot of time working this over in my mind. So many ways to screw this up!
 

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Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Steve that is really good work I particularly like your innovative use of jigs those are the challenges of woodworking I love the best & what a great result. I'm not good with production work after 2 units I want to get on to the next project so I really admire anyone who has the perseverance to do 6 off
great job
Trevor
 

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Discussion Starter · #103 ·
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Trevor - I am actually a lot like you. The only way I would get 6 of these done is to do them all now. If I were asked do to more, I'm not sure that would happen.

Autumn - Thanks! I like your signature line. The shop equipment is the result of years of getting by without and slowly adding pieces. Often when my Dad asks me what I want for my birthday, he chips in for a new tool. That works out every 3 or 4 years…
 

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4 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Nice work Uncle Steve. Those curves are amazing. These would look nice with the bar I'm just getting started with.
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Thanks Jras. I'm looking forward to seeing your bar - and maybe take it for a test drive!
 

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Discussion Starter · #106 ·
Corner blocks

I have two kinds of projects.

Some are the smaller ones that get wrapped up in a matter of days or weeks. I do several of these each year. Some are planned while others are done as the need pops up.

The others are bigger. They take on a life of their own. They can last for months and years. They get set aside and left gathering dust - sometimes for months. But I don't mind. I know that I will finish them and I would rather take a few years to complete a project than to have not done it.

These stools are definitely one of the bigger projects. They have been on the back burner while I worked on other projects for the first half of this year.

For those of you that wanted to see a project like this get done sooner, I recommend you check out GaryK's blog on his table and chairs. He did a great job and took WAY less time!

On to the project.

One of the features that I skipped over in the prototype was the corner blocks. In fact I wasn't even sure if I needed them. The extra side rail and the lower rails (all with mortise and tenon joints) give the stools a lot of structure. But I figured better safe than sorry.

I cut 24 triangular blocks from a 4/4 maple board. The blocks are small, so I decided to get the final shape with a jig and a router. The front blocks are angled slightly less than 90 degrees while the back ones are greater than 90 and the back edge is curved.

Wood Road surface Flooring Rectangle Floor


There is a jig for the left side and the right. Each jig holds a block for the front corner and the back. By putting two blocks on the jig I get a larger piece to handle while working with the router (fingers farther away from the bit). Each block gets screwed into place and a flush trim bit creates the final shape. The jig allows me to keep my hands away from the bit, but not enough. This bit was too big to sit inside my router fence, so I made a quick modification to my router fence to shield the bit. One of those times when I paid attention to that uneasy feeling - "Something's not right here"

I am using stub tenons on each side of the block, so I trimmed to corners off each point.

Wood Fixture Rectangle Wood stain Flooring


I then set up my router fence to expose 1/4" of the bit (with another mod to the fence).

Wood Floor Flooring Rectangle Wall


I started with the bit lower and did a couple passes. Eventually, I had a 1/4×1/4" lip on the two faces of each block.

Stairs Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain


Then over to the ShopSmith to drill counter bored holes.

Wood Tool Wood stain Tints and shades Hardwood


Then back to the router table to turn the lip into a stub tenon of the correct length.

Dog Wood Comfort Table Carnivore


Then drill center holes for attaching the seat. The end result is 24 corner blocks!

Wood Hardwood Flooring Metal Rectangle


The other detail is to go back to the rails and add a 1/4×1/4" slot for the stub tenons.

Brown Wood Stairs Wood stain Flooring


Finally, a note of the hours. I have been putting time into sanding parts. I'll cover that in a future post, but I am going to go ahead and get the hours recorded so far.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 1 hr 50 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 151 hr 15 min (25+ hrs per stool)
 

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6,953 Posts
Corner blocks

I have two kinds of projects.

Some are the smaller ones that get wrapped up in a matter of days or weeks. I do several of these each year. Some are planned while others are done as the need pops up.

The others are bigger. They take on a life of their own. They can last for months and years. They get set aside and left gathering dust - sometimes for months. But I don't mind. I know that I will finish them and I would rather take a few years to complete a project than to have not done it.

These stools are definitely one of the bigger projects. They have been on the back burner while I worked on other projects for the first half of this year.

For those of you that wanted to see a project like this get done sooner, I recommend you check out GaryK's blog on his table and chairs. He did a great job and took WAY less time!

On to the project.

One of the features that I skipped over in the prototype was the corner blocks. In fact I wasn't even sure if I needed them. The extra side rail and the lower rails (all with mortise and tenon joints) give the stools a lot of structure. But I figured better safe than sorry.

I cut 24 triangular blocks from a 4/4 maple board. The blocks are small, so I decided to get the final shape with a jig and a router. The front blocks are angled slightly less than 90 degrees while the back ones are greater than 90 and the back edge is curved.

Wood Road surface Flooring Rectangle Floor


There is a jig for the left side and the right. Each jig holds a block for the front corner and the back. By putting two blocks on the jig I get a larger piece to handle while working with the router (fingers farther away from the bit). Each block gets screwed into place and a flush trim bit creates the final shape. The jig allows me to keep my hands away from the bit, but not enough. This bit was too big to sit inside my router fence, so I made a quick modification to my router fence to shield the bit. One of those times when I paid attention to that uneasy feeling - "Something's not right here"

I am using stub tenons on each side of the block, so I trimmed to corners off each point.

Wood Fixture Rectangle Wood stain Flooring


I then set up my router fence to expose 1/4" of the bit (with another mod to the fence).

Wood Floor Flooring Rectangle Wall


I started with the bit lower and did a couple passes. Eventually, I had a 1/4×1/4" lip on the two faces of each block.

Stairs Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain


Then over to the ShopSmith to drill counter bored holes.

Wood Tool Wood stain Tints and shades Hardwood


Then back to the router table to turn the lip into a stub tenon of the correct length.

Dog Wood Comfort Table Carnivore


Then drill center holes for attaching the seat. The end result is 24 corner blocks!

Wood Hardwood Flooring Metal Rectangle


The other detail is to go back to the rails and add a 1/4×1/4" slot for the stub tenons.

Brown Wood Stairs Wood stain Flooring


Finally, a note of the hours. I have been putting time into sanding parts. I'll cover that in a future post, but I am going to go ahead and get the hours recorded so far.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 1 hr 50 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 151 hr 15 min (25+ hrs per stool)
Nice Photos, Steve!

Non-woodworkers don't realize the time involved in making projects.

Lew
 

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Discussion Starter · #108 ·
Corner blocks

I have two kinds of projects.

Some are the smaller ones that get wrapped up in a matter of days or weeks. I do several of these each year. Some are planned while others are done as the need pops up.

The others are bigger. They take on a life of their own. They can last for months and years. They get set aside and left gathering dust - sometimes for months. But I don't mind. I know that I will finish them and I would rather take a few years to complete a project than to have not done it.

These stools are definitely one of the bigger projects. They have been on the back burner while I worked on other projects for the first half of this year.

For those of you that wanted to see a project like this get done sooner, I recommend you check out GaryK's blog on his table and chairs. He did a great job and took WAY less time!

On to the project.

One of the features that I skipped over in the prototype was the corner blocks. In fact I wasn't even sure if I needed them. The extra side rail and the lower rails (all with mortise and tenon joints) give the stools a lot of structure. But I figured better safe than sorry.

I cut 24 triangular blocks from a 4/4 maple board. The blocks are small, so I decided to get the final shape with a jig and a router. The front blocks are angled slightly less than 90 degrees while the back ones are greater than 90 and the back edge is curved.

Wood Road surface Flooring Rectangle Floor


There is a jig for the left side and the right. Each jig holds a block for the front corner and the back. By putting two blocks on the jig I get a larger piece to handle while working with the router (fingers farther away from the bit). Each block gets screwed into place and a flush trim bit creates the final shape. The jig allows me to keep my hands away from the bit, but not enough. This bit was too big to sit inside my router fence, so I made a quick modification to my router fence to shield the bit. One of those times when I paid attention to that uneasy feeling - "Something's not right here"

I am using stub tenons on each side of the block, so I trimmed to corners off each point.

Wood Fixture Rectangle Wood stain Flooring


I then set up my router fence to expose 1/4" of the bit (with another mod to the fence).

Wood Floor Flooring Rectangle Wall


I started with the bit lower and did a couple passes. Eventually, I had a 1/4×1/4" lip on the two faces of each block.

Stairs Wood Rectangle Natural material Wood stain


Then over to the ShopSmith to drill counter bored holes.

Wood Tool Wood stain Tints and shades Hardwood


Then back to the router table to turn the lip into a stub tenon of the correct length.

Dog Wood Comfort Table Carnivore


Then drill center holes for attaching the seat. The end result is 24 corner blocks!

Wood Hardwood Flooring Metal Rectangle


The other detail is to go back to the rails and add a 1/4×1/4" slot for the stub tenons.

Brown Wood Stairs Wood stain Flooring


Finally, a note of the hours. I have been putting time into sanding parts. I'll cover that in a future post, but I am going to go ahead and get the hours recorded so far.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 1 hr 50 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 151 hr 15 min (25+ hrs per stool)
Thanks Lew! There is a reason why I don't often total my hours - I'm just in this for the fun!

This project was one I had no idea how many hours would be in, so why not find out? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #109 ·
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
 

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Joined
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8,391 Posts
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
A daunting challenge Steve, just in terms of the huge amount of parts not to mention all the machining and sanding. I like your approach to the work. I think your hinged router fence spacer is brilliant. Can't wait to see the glue-up part and the final stools. Keep up the good work!
 

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· Registered
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1,696 Posts
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
Very cool…169 hrs so far… whatever the final total, it will be worth it!
Ellen
 

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· Registered
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2,185 Posts
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
Yowser.
I don't mind sanding either. You go kind of Zen, and the wood reacts.
Quite the ambitious project. Good for you.

Steve
 

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· Registered
Joined
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7,502 Posts
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
That's a lotta tenons, & mortises
 

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· Registered
Joined
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6,953 Posts
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
Really coming along, Steve.

Cool idea using a mouse pad. I have a lot of those around and will be putting them to use- Thanks!
 

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· Registered
Joined
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6,838 Posts
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
quite a lot of parts start to build up here - looking good.
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #116 ·
Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
Thanks for the comments everyone!

The next section will finally give a view of all the parts spread out. I have given up trying to predict when this one will wrap up. The family opinion is "Never" ;)
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #117 ·
Oxidizing for color

Yes - oxidize. Not stain. Not dye.

Alin Dobra posted a very informative blog on using potassium dichromate to cause wood to darken the same way it does when exposed to sunlight. I'll let you read his entry to learn about the technique. These stools will eventually be sitting around the island in our kitchen. The sun will only land on the top part of the backs and I don't want them to develop "tan lines".

This was my first experience with the technique. I coated the surface twice to make sure I had uniform coverage. You can see how much darker the mahogany is after treatment. The two pieces on the right were just coated.

Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


After the surface was dry, I sanded each surface with 320, 400 and 600 grit.

This process caused me to lay out all the parts at once. These next pictures give a pretty good view of the number of pieces in this project. I had to clean off my workbench just to find space!

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish


Wood Stairs Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Composite material Rectangle Metal Cuisine


Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Table Wood stain Varnish


Wood Wood stain Floor Hardwood Chair


The total is 156 pieces of mahogany.

Wood Font Hardwood Pattern Natural material


And 24 pieces of maple.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 178 hr 40 min (~30 hrs per stool)
 

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· Registered
Joined
·
7,502 Posts
Oxidizing for color

Yes - oxidize. Not stain. Not dye.

Alin Dobra posted a very informative blog on using potassium dichromate to cause wood to darken the same way it does when exposed to sunlight. I'll let you read his entry to learn about the technique. These stools will eventually be sitting around the island in our kitchen. The sun will only land on the top part of the backs and I don't want them to develop "tan lines".

This was my first experience with the technique. I coated the surface twice to make sure I had uniform coverage. You can see how much darker the mahogany is after treatment. The two pieces on the right were just coated.

Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


After the surface was dry, I sanded each surface with 320, 400 and 600 grit.

This process caused me to lay out all the parts at once. These next pictures give a pretty good view of the number of pieces in this project. I had to clean off my workbench just to find space!

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish


Wood Stairs Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Composite material Rectangle Metal Cuisine


Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Table Wood stain Varnish


Wood Wood stain Floor Hardwood Chair


The total is 156 pieces of mahogany.

Wood Font Hardwood Pattern Natural material


And 24 pieces of maple.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 178 hr 40 min (~30 hrs per stool)
Very interesting. That Mahogany is really gr8 lookin. Lotsa mortise & tenons there.. pieces n parts, oh my..
 

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· Registered
Joined
·
7,151 Posts
Oxidizing for color

Yes - oxidize. Not stain. Not dye.

Alin Dobra posted a very informative blog on using potassium dichromate to cause wood to darken the same way it does when exposed to sunlight. I'll let you read his entry to learn about the technique. These stools will eventually be sitting around the island in our kitchen. The sun will only land on the top part of the backs and I don't want them to develop "tan lines".

This was my first experience with the technique. I coated the surface twice to make sure I had uniform coverage. You can see how much darker the mahogany is after treatment. The two pieces on the right were just coated.

Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


After the surface was dry, I sanded each surface with 320, 400 and 600 grit.

This process caused me to lay out all the parts at once. These next pictures give a pretty good view of the number of pieces in this project. I had to clean off my workbench just to find space!

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish


Wood Stairs Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Composite material Rectangle Metal Cuisine


Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Table Wood stain Varnish


Wood Wood stain Floor Hardwood Chair


The total is 156 pieces of mahogany.

Wood Font Hardwood Pattern Natural material


And 24 pieces of maple.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 178 hr 40 min (~30 hrs per stool)
Steve - this is quite and epic project…...interesting concept using the chemical process. Build on!
 

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· In Loving Memory
Joined
·
8,391 Posts
Oxidizing for color

Yes - oxidize. Not stain. Not dye.

Alin Dobra posted a very informative blog on using potassium dichromate to cause wood to darken the same way it does when exposed to sunlight. I'll let you read his entry to learn about the technique. These stools will eventually be sitting around the island in our kitchen. The sun will only land on the top part of the backs and I don't want them to develop "tan lines".

This was my first experience with the technique. I coated the surface twice to make sure I had uniform coverage. You can see how much darker the mahogany is after treatment. The two pieces on the right were just coated.

Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


After the surface was dry, I sanded each surface with 320, 400 and 600 grit.

This process caused me to lay out all the parts at once. These next pictures give a pretty good view of the number of pieces in this project. I had to clean off my workbench just to find space!

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish


Wood Stairs Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Composite material Rectangle Metal Cuisine


Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Table Wood stain Varnish


Wood Wood stain Floor Hardwood Chair


The total is 156 pieces of mahogany.

Wood Font Hardwood Pattern Natural material


And 24 pieces of maple.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 178 hr 40 min (~30 hrs per stool)
Very interesting Steve. Something I've never heard about before. Where do you buy the chemicals? This is a big project which would be very taxing on most small workshops, but you have really done a lot of great work with it so far.

It looks to me that you will soon be into the glue-up stage. I can imagine that you will face some challenges there as well, and I look forward to seeing how you do it. The blog and the work is so well organized that it should set an excellent example and show folks a very good way to produce high quality multiples.

I can't wait to see the finished stools in your kitchen!
 

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