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While visions of perfection dance in my head

I deal with correcting mistakes instead!

It has been quite a while since my last post, but I AM still working on this project. In addition to regular life, we have had a week long vacation, business trips (including 2 weeks in China), a family illness and preparing for RAGBRAI . The shop time has been hard to come by.

I figured this would be a good time to confess and share how I am dealing with this round of unexpected issues.

Dull Bandsaw Blade

I started to shape one side of the back legs. I knew my bandsaw had a dull blade, but I got lazy and told myself that I could just leave a little extra wood. Wrong. The blade took on a twist and curved right past my line. Stopped and bought a new blade (one with a better tooth profile) and the rest of the cuts went fine. But I was stuck with one leg that needed help.

My solution was to flatten out the damaged area and glue a patch on.



After the glue dried, I smoothed the sides. The grain matched quite well.



Once I did the final shaping, there is a faint glue line that I think willl nearly disappear once the wood darkens (sorry no pic)

Router Pattern

This one was an act of real poor thinking. I had been shaping several legs and always being careful to turn the router on and off only when it was stable on the template.

Except this ONE time.

I lifted the router while it was on and the bit cut into the pattern :( The solution here was automotive body filler (Bondo).



The filler was applied to the cut and then sanded smooth.



Chipout

The base of the leg flares out and it was not a surprise that I had some chipout. Most of the time, I could find the missing piece and glue it back in. One time I had to make a patch. I squared up the chipped area and flattened it with a sharp chisel.



I found a piece of wood with matching color and glued a block in.



Mortises and Tenons

This project has a LOT of mortises and tenons. I took extra time to draw each mortise and then I would check it against my pattern piece.

Foolproof - right?

Wrong!

Every once in a while, I would forget to check a piece against my pattern. As luck would have it, one time I skipped checking was on a part where I had shifted the mortise location 1/2 inch. Back to gluing patches… I came up with a fairly creative soution to apply pressure while the glue dried. Luckily, this particular joint has a tenon shoulder that will completely cover this patch.



I managed to cut a tenon or two a little thin. More patches. These are completely hidden inside the mortises. I should point out the black dot on the end of the tenon. This is my technique for preserving the orientation of each piece. The black dot is always in the top right front corner of each piece.



The Big One

When I first did the rough cutting of the legs, I had one kick back incident. The only damage was the blade dug into the side of one of the legs. I saved the scrap from shaping the leg to get a good color match.



I used my laminate trimmer to create a pocket of even depth. Then I created a paper pattern by rubbing a pencil over the recessed area. I cut a thin slice off my patch piece and placed the pattern to match the grain.



It took a while to get the patch shape to match the cutout area. Lots of hand filing.



I glued the patch in place with just a little extra thickness. A little sanding and this is what I ended up with. I had hoped for a little better color match, but it is down next to the floor so hopefully it won't be too big of a distraction.



I have been cutting a lot of motises and tenons. Not the most thrilling blog material, but I'll try to show where I am with my next post.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Tenon: 13 hrs 20 min

Total so far: 78 hrs 45 min (13+ hrs per stool)
Wow, you are a patient fellow. I would have just given that project a big kick and chucked it all right into the fireplace. But you persevered, an admirable trait. For me, the nice thing about building rustic live, edge is: oops- hey-that looks pretty good there- oops- rrrrrrrrrr goes the belt sander- awww yes- nice character- chunk chunk pound pound- rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr - okay now if fits just right. Too short? Firewood. Too long? chopsaw. Sand it down- add some tung oil… level those legs and wala… no filler, no patching, no grain matching required. LOL
 

· Registered
Joined
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5,826 Posts
While visions of perfection dance in my head

I deal with correcting mistakes instead!

It has been quite a while since my last post, but I AM still working on this project. In addition to regular life, we have had a week long vacation, business trips (including 2 weeks in China), a family illness and preparing for RAGBRAI . The shop time has been hard to come by.

I figured this would be a good time to confess and share how I am dealing with this round of unexpected issues.

Dull Bandsaw Blade

I started to shape one side of the back legs. I knew my bandsaw had a dull blade, but I got lazy and told myself that I could just leave a little extra wood. Wrong. The blade took on a twist and curved right past my line. Stopped and bought a new blade (one with a better tooth profile) and the rest of the cuts went fine. But I was stuck with one leg that needed help.

My solution was to flatten out the damaged area and glue a patch on.



After the glue dried, I smoothed the sides. The grain matched quite well.



Once I did the final shaping, there is a faint glue line that I think willl nearly disappear once the wood darkens (sorry no pic)

Router Pattern

This one was an act of real poor thinking. I had been shaping several legs and always being careful to turn the router on and off only when it was stable on the template.

Except this ONE time.

I lifted the router while it was on and the bit cut into the pattern :( The solution here was automotive body filler (Bondo).



The filler was applied to the cut and then sanded smooth.



Chipout

The base of the leg flares out and it was not a surprise that I had some chipout. Most of the time, I could find the missing piece and glue it back in. One time I had to make a patch. I squared up the chipped area and flattened it with a sharp chisel.



I found a piece of wood with matching color and glued a block in.



Mortises and Tenons

This project has a LOT of mortises and tenons. I took extra time to draw each mortise and then I would check it against my pattern piece.

Foolproof - right?

Wrong!

Every once in a while, I would forget to check a piece against my pattern. As luck would have it, one time I skipped checking was on a part where I had shifted the mortise location 1/2 inch. Back to gluing patches… I came up with a fairly creative soution to apply pressure while the glue dried. Luckily, this particular joint has a tenon shoulder that will completely cover this patch.



I managed to cut a tenon or two a little thin. More patches. These are completely hidden inside the mortises. I should point out the black dot on the end of the tenon. This is my technique for preserving the orientation of each piece. The black dot is always in the top right front corner of each piece.



The Big One

When I first did the rough cutting of the legs, I had one kick back incident. The only damage was the blade dug into the side of one of the legs. I saved the scrap from shaping the leg to get a good color match.



I used my laminate trimmer to create a pocket of even depth. Then I created a paper pattern by rubbing a pencil over the recessed area. I cut a thin slice off my patch piece and placed the pattern to match the grain.



It took a while to get the patch shape to match the cutout area. Lots of hand filing.



I glued the patch in place with just a little extra thickness. A little sanding and this is what I ended up with. I had hoped for a little better color match, but it is down next to the floor so hopefully it won't be too big of a distraction.



I have been cutting a lot of motises and tenons. Not the most thrilling blog material, but I'll try to show where I am with my next post.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Tenon: 13 hrs 20 min

Total so far: 78 hrs 45 min (13+ hrs per stool)
Enjoyed this post, Steve. Mistakes happen to everybody but sometimes, when they do, it's also rewarding to repair them the proper way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
 

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Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Glad to see you are back on this project.
Looks like it is coming along nicely.
Nearly 100 hours for a one of a kind set of chairs… not too shabby!!
Ellen
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #85 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Thanks Ellen!
Slow and steady - well more slow than steady ;)
But I am making progress. Usually I have more time in the fall & winter to get in the shop. This is still going to take a while.
You would think I could have worked 5 more minutes and hit the 100 hour mark! I don't know if I am half way there yet…
 

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6,838 Posts
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Steve, these are looking really great. love the mahogany choice of material for this.
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #87 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Thanks PurpLev,
It is my first time using furniture grade mahogany. It has taken on a darker color just while sitting in the shop. I am glad I bought some extra when I started this project.
This is an African Mahogany known as Khaya.
 

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Joined
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822 Posts
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Hi Steve. Wow, what an endeavor. A tip of my cap to you for the amount of work you have done and all the hours you have put into this. The stools look marvelous. I am impressed with your ingenuity in coming up with jigs, spacer blockes, etc. to get the job done. On a selfish note, I am glad I read your post because I am making a picnic table right now and have been struggling to come up with a better idea than that suggested in the magazine for a specific cut on 16 pieces. (They recommend using a jig saw.) Seeing you use the tenoning jig, turned on the light bulb. I think I can rig something up tomorrow using mine. Thanks and once again, great job!
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Hi Lenny - I hope they turn out as well as I intend. Glad to hear you were able to find an inspiration. Good luck on your project. Thanks for the compliments!
 

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Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Welcome to the custom furniture market! These are really nice. Everything I read about Greene and Greene makes me think of this sort of work. They weren't cheap in their work, either. Good wood costs good money. I'm just glad for you that you have the skills, or that would be a pile of firewood. The finishing work is going to be equally an amount of work. So, the question is, are you going to flinch every time someone sets their feet on the bottom stretcher? It's time now to think about wear marks as a positive accent. I've fretted for years over that…I always want my handiwork to shine forever.
 

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Joined
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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #91 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Thanks AtomJack!
I hope my skills continue to be worthy of the quality of my materials. I "discovered' Greene & Greene a little over a year ago. Their story is an inspiration even though the design is not derived from their work.
Finishing is going to be a challenge. I am considering prefinishing - this would be a new experience for me. I feel like I am less than halfway done (hopefully close).
As to those character marks to come. I always struggle with this, but I found I really want to create useful pieces that are also beautiful. Signs of use mean I was able to create utility. Hope that makes sense. I am considering a brass trim for the lower stretcher…
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
 

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· Registered
Joined
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1,696 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Lookin' good, Steve!
You will have 6 of the finest stools and can take pride in the fact that YOU made them (not IKEA)!!
 

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Joined
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8,391 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Making chairs is a pretty slow process Steve, except maybe for those that do every day. So I'm not surprised that this project is taking awhile, especially considering all the curvy complexity involved. You have accomplished quite a bit in only 108 hrs. I know these are going to be fantastic stools when they're finished and you will never want to get rid of them. Great work so far and a wonderful blog too. Can't wait to see them completed.
 

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Joined
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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #95 ·
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Thanks Ellen, You'll know they are not IKEA if you were to pick one up. They are going to have a nice heavy feel to them.

Thanks Mike, My oldest son teases me with "Those are never going to be finished!" We know better, but they do take a long time. For instance, my weekend in the shop will result in very little time spent on these as other projects take priority.
 

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· Registered
Joined
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5,279 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
This is amazing Steve. As you started this long before I joined up, I have just discovered it and have just fully enjoyed the whole ride from the start to the present. I applaud your organization, planning and attention to detail. It's really something to see the process that someone else goes through to arrive at the desired end and your documentation is as complete as anyone could ask. I do things soooo differently. These are sure to be real head turners and will be a source of enjoyment for you every time you enter the kitchen … for the rest of your life.

What a great accomplishment! Congratulations!

I have to stop now or I won't have anything left to say when you post them as a finished project.
 

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· Registered
Joined
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2,011 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
That's OK Steve. Your slow speed helps me keep up as old Arthur Ritis seems to have moved in for the winter. lol I appreciate you thinking of us old cripples and switching to slo-mo. lol

Those tenons are to die for.Man, those are great crisp lines and the curves of the backs. Wow! You guysand gals that make the furniture just amaze me. Rand
 

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· Registered
Joined
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2,185 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Like Paul, I had missed this whole series. Very nice.

It looks like it takes you a while, but you get to figure out things as you go. That is part of the fun to me.

You can put a bar or pipe clamp together backwards to spread things apart. Just remember to put them together the right way around before you need them again, or things get confusing :)

Steve
 

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· Registered
Joined
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6,953 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
Steve,

I really got a bunch of ideas from this- especially your use of clamping jigs/procedures, thanks!!

It is amazing how much time a project actually takes. You don't realize it until you start documenting the hours.

Lew
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
3,011 Posts
Seat backs

Q: What goes slower than my progress on these stools?

A: My blog on these stools!

I have been making progress. Other projects and Christmas gifts provided distractions. And woodworking is still a hobby and has to wait for when there is time after everything else. I find that I am quite able to let a bigger project like this sit to one side for a few weeks and come back to it when I can.

Next up are the seat backs. The last entry covered fitting the top and bottom rail of the seat back. Now I need to cut the slats to length. I used an insert from my glue up form to align each slat.

Wood Engineering Cutting mat Bumper Metal


Each piece has been numbered for color and grain direction. As I cut them to length I need to transfer the numbers.

Rectangle Wood Brick Wooden block Natural material


To put the mortises in the upper and lower rails, I used the glue up form and fixtured it in the mortiser. The rail is positioned in the form to locate the mortise. The form can slide between two stops to give me the correct width.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Hand tool Wood Tool Saw Hardwood


Now I need to form tenons on each end of the slats. Again, I use the insert from the glue up form - this time in the tenon jig.

Wood Tool Gas Machine Flooring


Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Door Flooring Material property Hardwood


Now I can put the back together for a test fit. Looks good!

Wood Floor Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


BUT - the tenons were a little tight. I did not think much of it until I tried to pull it apart. Not happening. I knew the "use a hammer until it gives up" option was not a good one. It took a while (like a couple days) to figure out out to pull it apart, but I came up with a solution.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Machine Workbench


After adjusting the tenons for a better fit. I now have seat backs!

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Varnish Flooring


There are a lot of angles in this project, but I think the most interesting part is the back. Every part is curved and makes for a very inviting appearance.

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 5 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hr 30 min

Total so far: 108 hr 10 min (18+ hrs per stool)
I have never built a chair nor do I think I will… great to see how you do all the pieces.. fabulously documented…
some of these techniques could be adapted to other projects so thanks for the post…
 

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