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Finding shop time in a busy schedule -or- Making slats & cutting pieces

The next step in this project is making the curved slats for the back of the stool. The process is the same as for the curved parts with a couple exceptions. First the pieces for each set of slats are cut from two blocks. These blocks were next to each other when cut from the large stock. Instead of marking with a saw cut as I did last time, I used a permanent marker.



By angling one stripe across both blocks, I am able to keep the strips in order. The total number of stripes tells me which stool this set of strips belong to.

The other difference is the clamping jig.



This jig has two curves and required careful adjustment to create a tight fitting result.

But, this is not what I want to write about for this post. I think it would be nice to share how I find shop time. We all have busy schedules and, at least for me, the woodshop takes a lower priority. I find that I can fit in shop time a little bit at a time.

I start out with a stack of strips to be glued up. This makes a good example of how to find shop time.



My shop is located off the back of my garage. Gluing up a set of 4 strips takes 10 to 15 minutes. If I can find that much time before I leave for work, I have enough time to glue one more set.



As the days go by, I find that the pile slowly shifts from only one done to only a few left to do.



And then the day comes when I have glued the last one up!



Then there are days when I have more time. That is when I can take the rest of the wood and start to cut it into final pieces.



In this case, there is a bit of prep work to make sure that the grain runs from one part to the next wherever possible. There were several 15 to 30 minute sessions where I just focused on marking the pieces.



Once again, cutting the pieces is done a little bit at a time. The longest session was less than 2 hours. Over time, the pile of big parts turns into a pile of smaller parts.



And once again, the day came when the last pieces were cut.



There is likely some extra time in this project that results from working in small sessions. For me the tradeoff is that I get to make progress and spend time in the shop more often.

The project is now to the point where all the pieces have been cut to thickness and width (well almost all … ). Next is cutting to length and then cutting mortises.



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
>Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs

Total so far: 44 hrs (7+ hrs per stool)
Jim took the text right outta my fingers. lol
 

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Shaping and sanding

Shaping and sanding is pretty easy to figure out, so I'll just share a few of the techniques I used on this project.

The back legs still needed to be cut to final shape on one remaining side. The template was clamped onto each leg.

Wood Flooring Floor Gas Hardwood


The shape is traced onto the leg.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Hardwood Flooring


Cut on the bandsaw with about 1/16" left.

Hood Wood Automotive exterior Rectangle Beige


A router with a guide bearing and straight bit made the first pass using the template.

Tire Automotive tire Table Wood Tread


Even with multiple passes, I still had an occasional blow out.

Product Wood Wood stain Flooring Natural material


Repairs involved gluing pieces back in place and then routing very carefully. After this one, I used the disc sander to get very close to the line before using the router.

Gas Wood Office equipment Metal Musical instrument accessory


Nearly every exposed edge has a radius routed on it. Radii of 1/16, 1/8, 1/4 and 3/8 were used. Here is example of the bottom of the front leg. I sand the surfaces to 120 grit before I add the roundover routing. The smooth surface helps create a cleaner roundover.

Table Wood Rectangle Wood stain Hardwood


The larger radii caused me some concern. I set up the fence on my router table with a spacer strip.

Wood Automotive exterior Table Wood stain Bumper


This allowed me to make a first pass with a partial depth cut.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring Plywood


Then I flipped up the spacer strip and made a full depth cut. If you look closely, you'll see that the bit is not flush to the fence. This way I could get the first and second passes to be the depths I wanted.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The next thing to cover is the sanding. I have put in LOTS of hours sanding. Not that I mind. I kind of enjoy feeling how each grit makes the part more smooth. The hours are from the fact this project has lots of parts.

Wood Table Rectangle Floor Flooring

Wood Gas Hardwood Art Wood stain


And those are just a few of the parts. Remember there are 6 of these!

I do my sanding by hand. I use a block for the flat surfaces.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Pattern Wood stain


A piece of an old mouse pad for the radiused edges.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Tints and shades Font


And a curved block for the inside curves.

Hand Wood Finger Tints and shades Hardwood


I step through each of the grits - 60, 80, 100, 120, 15, 180, 220, 320.

Finally, here is an update on the hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 168 hr 50 min (28+ hrs per stool)
That's a lotta tenons, & mortises
 

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Oxidizing for color

Yes - oxidize. Not stain. Not dye.

Alin Dobra posted a very informative blog on using potassium dichromate to cause wood to darken the same way it does when exposed to sunlight. I'll let you read his entry to learn about the technique. These stools will eventually be sitting around the island in our kitchen. The sun will only land on the top part of the backs and I don't want them to develop "tan lines".

This was my first experience with the technique. I coated the surface twice to make sure I had uniform coverage. You can see how much darker the mahogany is after treatment. The two pieces on the right were just coated.

Rectangle Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


After the surface was dry, I sanded each surface with 320, 400 and 600 grit.

This process caused me to lay out all the parts at once. These next pictures give a pretty good view of the number of pieces in this project. I had to clean off my workbench just to find space!

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish


Wood Stairs Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Wood Composite material Rectangle Metal Cuisine


Wood Rectangle Flooring Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Table Wood stain Varnish


Wood Wood stain Floor Hardwood Chair


The total is 156 pieces of mahogany.

Wood Font Hardwood Pattern Natural material


And 24 pieces of maple.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 178 hr 40 min (~30 hrs per stool)
Very interesting. That Mahogany is really gr8 lookin. Lotsa mortise & tenons there.. pieces n parts, oh my..
 

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Mask & Prep for finish

I have decided to finish each piece before assembly. The benefit is it will be easier to get an even coat all the way to the end of each piece with no internal corners to catch finish.

The challenge is in keeping the joints clear of finish and eventually working with finished parts during glue-up.

For now, I only need to concern myself with keeping the mortises and tenons free of finish. The tenons were the easy part. I just masked off each one with blue painter's tape. If I counted right, I ended up taping 264 tenons!

Some of them are pictured here…

Wood Rectangle Musical instrument Hardwood Composite material


I did not concern myself with taping the shoulders of the tenons as the glue joint strength is mainly from the tenon.

Rectangle Wood Composite material Electric blue Tints and shades


I spent some time trying to figure out how to protect the mortises, but I REALLY did NOT want to mask the inside of 264 mortises. Since I will be wiping on the finish, I decided to see if I could just be careful and not let the finish run into the mortises.

The next step was to set up the pieces for finishing. I needed to support each piece such that none of the finished surfaces would be in contact with anything.

For the pieces with a tenon on each end that was pretty easy - just set each tenon on a support rail.

Wood Rectangle Floor Outdoor furniture Flooring


The legs are a little different. They do not have a tenon on the ends. The front legs were set up by screwing a hook into the top. The top of the front leg will eventually be covered by the seat.

Wood Wood stain Hardwood Home fencing Metal


The back legs were more of a puzzle. All surfaces are exposed. I guess I could screw a hook into the bottom of the leg, but I did not care for a hole there. It took me a while to figure this out, but I ended up creating a set of stands that supported each leg in the bottom of each of three mortises that run along the inside face. I forgot to take a picture of this during the setup, so these show a preview of the finish work under way.

Wood Gas Hardwood Wood stain Varnish


Wood Flooring Floor Office supplies Wood stain


Now I'm ready to apply the finish. I still need to figure out how to assemble pieces with finish already on them. I have some time to figure that out. It's all part of the fun.

You'll notice that the total hours went up by almost 7, about an hour and a half was spent setting up supports for the legs. That leaves about 5 and a half hours for taping tenons. That works out to a little over a minute per tenon!

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 h 25 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 h 30 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 183 hr 35 min (~31 hrs per stool)
Wow Steve. Like Jeff said. Also, you could hang all those legs from the ceiling like that to get a good wooden tone wind chime/s. Dat's a lotta mortise n tenons my friend. Super nice also.
 

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Finish is on - all 9 coats! Plus 2 buffing, wax and polish

After getting everything set up, the next step was put the finish on! I really like this step, each coat increases the gloss, depth and color.

I use a two finish process, both parts are from General Finishes. The first finish is their oil based coat.

Tin Bottle Drink Alcoholic beverage Tin can


I wipe the finish on with a piece of cheesecloth. The first coat basically soaks into the wood.

Wood Floor Flooring Hardwood Wood stain


Areas where the grain is very tight, even the first coat shows a little gloss. I add more coats until the wood shows a uniform gloss. On average, it takes 5 coats to get there.

After that, I buff each face with 600 grit and 000 steel wool.

Next up is the top coat.

Alcoholic beverage Tin Drink Metal Font


Since these stools will see heavy use, I wanted a heavy finish. When looking for a heavy finish, my rule is "add coats until you don't want to add any more". That took 4 coats. I'm pretty sure that I have a good durable finish on these parts.

After the top coats, I buffed each face with 000 steel wool and the applied a coat of paste wax and polished each face. I figure the wax will help with any clean up when I do the glue up.

I am really pleased with how the pieces look at this point. The appearance is great and the polished wax gives a really nice feel to each part.

Wood Textile Rectangle Flooring Hardwood


Hair Brown Light Wood Textile


Wood Rectangle Hardwood Tints and shades Flooring


Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Flooring


Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Stairs


Now I have to get ready for glue up. I have to confess that this step has caused me a great deal of pondering for the duration of this project. The main choice I have is do I glue up sub assemblies or do I glue up an entire stool at once? I am interested in your opinions on this one…

Gluing assemblies has the benefit of allowing the use of wood glues with shorter open time as well as less confusion and stress during glue up. The down side is if any assembly ends up a little out of square or twisted, it will be very difficult to correct it later on.

Gluing the entire stool is a much more complex process. I would expect to use epoxy to allow a sufficient open time. It would also require a really good fixture and clamping technique to ensure the stool is aligned.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 h 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 h 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 h 30 min
> Finish: 12 h 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Total so far: 215 hr 15 min (~36 hrs per stool)
Wow! Those pieces & parts are lookin super. It's gonna be a beaut!!
 

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Jigs for glue up

This last weekend was spent setting up the process for assembly and glue up. I had not expected I would spend this much time coming up with a glue up solution. Still, this was a fun puzzle to solve.

The first step was to remove the masking tape. It took a while to peel of tape from all 244 tenons!

Creative arts Art Petal Electric blue Plastic


One concern I had with clamping pre-finished parts was damaging the finish. In past times I have had the texture of any padding end up imprinting into the finish. I decided to use a smooth surface to line the inside of my clamping jigs. I used masonite hardboard to line the jigs. The assembly of the jigs took all my spring clamps!

Wood Shelf Hardwood Composite material Engineering


Engineering Machine Tool Fashion accessory Composite material


I went through a couple iterations to arrive at my final solution and clamping sequence. I chose to assemble the entire chair in a single glue-up. I used my prototype to develop the clamping sequence.

One of the fun parts about this step is I had to go buy more clamps!

The first step is to clamp the seat back assembly. This step is optional and is only done when the assembly resists being fully compressed. The jigs look like this.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor Gas


And is used like this. The trick was the top rail and the bottom rail do not line up so I needed a way to get the clamp force to pull the parts together without causing the clamp to slide off.

Product Wood Wood stain Hardwood Flooring


Next are two pads for the top of the back.

Rectangle Wood Triangle Floor Flooring


The angled wedges on each side are used to let a clamp pull the two back legs together at the top.

Wood Hardwood Natural material Tool Wood stain


Then there are two sets of clamping pads to pull the back legs together at the middle and bottom rails.

Rectangle Wood Material property Flooring Hardwood


Rectangle Wood Hardwood Font Plywood


Here is a view of the bottom pads in action. The middle pads serve double duty and will show up a little later…

Wood Floor Automotive exterior Gas Asphalt


The next set of pads are for the front legs. They have a top block so they rest on the legs and are long enough on the outside faces to cover the lower rail.

Wood Rectangle Bumper Stairs Composite material


The first clamping step is to pull the two front legs together at the top and bottom.

Wood Gas Composite material Metal Plywood


Then the front leg assembly is clamped to the back leg assembly at the top. Here is where the middle pads for the back legs show up.

Wood Saw Gas Hardwood Wood stain


The last set of pads are for the bottom rails.

Rectangle Wood Flooring Font Hardwood


Two more clamps finish the job.

Wood Tool Gas Bicycle part Machine


Here is the final solution.

Wood Flooring Engineering Hardwood Gas


Wood Vehicle Engineering Building Gas


I promise the next post will show assembled frames!

Finally a note on the hours. I only added the time to remove the masking tape. I have not included the time to build any of the jigs and I chose to stay with that precedent.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 h 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 h 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 h 30 min
> Finish: 12 h 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 35 min
> Holes: 1 hr

Frame assembly
> Remove Masking Tape: 1 hr 30 min

Total so far: 216 hr 45 min (~36 hrs per stool)
Ahhh yess….... fabrication, and clamps. You can never have too much, or too many. Looks like they're comin along nicely
 

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Assembling 6 stools with pre-finished parts

After I got the parts all finished, I was really excited to do a dry fit and see how everything looked. I didn't even bother to change into any shop clothes!

Glasses Wood Loom Hardwood Wood stain


As you can see, tongue position is important when dry fitting pre-finished parts.

Before I actually glued up an assembly, I dry fit the stool. The corner blocks are then set in place. The tenons on the corner blocks needed a little fitting to get them into position. Pilot holes for the screws were drilled and then the stool is disassembled. Then I set the parts out to make sure I have everything ready to go.

Wood Gas Hardwood Flooring Electric blue


I also make sure the clamps and clamping jigs are in order.

Hood Wood Bumper Gas Automotive exterior


Gluing up an entire stool at once requires a glue that has a loooonnnng open time. I am using epoxy. I learned about epoxy assembly from building kayaks a few years ago.

Fluid Liquid Packing materials Household supply Gas


This epoxy needs to mixed in a 2:1 ratio (resin:hardener) by volume. You can use pumps to meter out the portions. Others use scales that account for the ratio and density differences. I find it much easier to measure out volumes. I use old pill bottles to do this.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Highball glass Beer


I mark the left one to measure out a single part of the mixture. I then pour water to that level and transfer two parts into the right container and mark that level. I then add one more part and mark that level. I then empty the water out and dry it well. I then add resin to the first mark and hardener to the second mark.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Barware Ingredient


The epoxy needs a structural filler to create strong joints. I also added a little mahogany sanding sawdust to tint the mixture. The entire tub of sawdust was collecting from sanding all the parts . I reserve some of the epoxy to pre-wet the joint and the rest is transferred to a cup and the fillers are added.

Cup Drink Gas Paint Cylinder


I use an acid brush to pre-wet the tenon and the mortise. This is a very thin layer as I do not want to deal with a lot of squeeze out. As I understand it, the pre-wetting allows the wood to absorb some epoxy and helps prevent epoxy being wicked away from the joint.

Wood Water Musical instrument Metal Close-up


Wood Fluid Wood stain Musical instrument Hardwood


I then spread the thickened mixture on the walls of the mortise.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Metal Wood stain


The assembly sequence is the same as described in the gluing jig post just before this one. After the parts are clamped, the corner blocks were glued and screwed into position.

Wood Hardwood Composite material Wood stain Engineering


The masonite surfaces on the clamping pads worked very well. I had no marks from clamping. There was very little epoxy squeeze out. When this did happen, ithe wax on the parts made clean up quite successful. The final results looks very nice.

Furniture Chair Wood Outdoor furniture Comfort


I paid close attention to making sure all four legs were in contact with the floor after clamping. I unclamped it and it was rock solid on the shop floor. When I brought the first stool into the house and tried to rock it, there was a slight "tick-tick-tick" as I wiggled it. Rats - not perfect, but close. Shop floor must not be flat. With the next stool, I made sure I found a perfectly flat spot on the shop floor.
The second stool was dead square - even when turning 90 degrees. Brought it into the house and it was rock solid. Then I put it in place the first stool sat - "tick-tick-tick".

Ah- HA! My kitchen floor is not flat!! The rocking is really slight and goes away when I put my weight on the stool.

They look really nice and are now ready for seats.

Wood Wood stain Varnish Hardwood Rectangle


Light Wood Wood stain Line Hardwood


They all look good sitting in their final home.

Chair Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


Furniture Wood Chair Flooring Wood stain


The finishing process took about 11 hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 hr 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 hr 30 min
> Finish: 12 hr 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 1 hr 15 min
> Holes: 1 hr 30 min

Frame assembly
> Remove Masking Tape: 1 hr 30 min
> Dry Fitting: 4 hr 20 min
> Glue up: 6 hr 50 min

Total so far: 229 hr 5 min (~38 hrs per stool)
Oh man, Steve. Wow! Those came out beautifully. Super, super nice. First class furniture for sure. Look forward to seein the seats on em.
 

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Seat Upholstery

Confession - I finished the upholstery several weeks ago but have not gotten the blog updated until now. Oh well, everything else about this project has been on its own pace so there is no sense in changing now;)

Here we go. The next step is to cut seat blanks. I used a sheet of good quality 3/8 plywood.

Table Wood Wood stain Floor Automotive exterior


I printed out a full size pattern.

Wood Rectangle Material property Composite material Flooring


Cut it out on the bandsaw.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Sanded it smooth.

Brown Wood Table Flooring Floor


I then used the first cutout as a pattern for the other 5 seat blanks.

Wood Table Flooring Floor Wood stain


I used a brad point bit to mark the hole locations.

Wood Art Creative arts Safety glove Hardwood


I used a T-nut to bolt the seat blank to the stool.

Wood Table Wood stain Beige Hardwood


As always with this project. I keep moving on and eventually I get to the end of each step.

Furniture Chair Wood Outdoor furniture Outdoor table


After the seat blanks are done, its time to cut the foam. I used 1 1/2 inch thick blocks of upholstery foam. I used the bandsaw to cut to shape and then tapered the foam.

Hood Automotive tire Automotive design Fender Automotive exterior


I took out the bandsaw table insert so I could tilt the table as far as possible (I would guess 50+ degrees). The seats were cut about 3/8 inch oversize and the taper ended up just over an inch inside the seat outline.

Publication Wood Hardwood Rectangle Flooring


The foam is glued to the seat base with spray adhesive. After the foam is bonded, the edges are bent over and stuck to the seat. This gives a pretty good shape to the seat even before fabric is added.

Rectangle Wood Hardwood Linens Beige


After the foam, next is a layer of muslin.

Sleeve Wood Beige Hardwood Tints and shades


This is followed by the final fabric. The pattern is located and stapled front & back.

Product Rectangle Wood Beige Hardwood


Then the sides & corners.

Wood Rectangle Ingredient Cuisine Dish


Trim the excess.

Hand Wood Sleeve Finger Safety glove


Add heavy paper.

Brown Natural material Wood Cuisine Beige


And - finally - bolt the finished seat to the frame!

Brown Wood Trunk Gas Automotive exterior


Here is a view of the final seat.

Comfort Wood Bed frame Rectangle Flooring


I'll save the final pics for the project posting - given past behavior that could take a while ;)

Here is the final time log:

=================================================

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 hr 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 hr 30 min
> Finish: 12 hr 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 1 hr 15 min
> Holes: 1 hr 30 min

Frame assembly
> Remove Masking Tape: 1 hr 30 min
> Dry Fitting: 4 hr 20 min
> Glue up: 6 hr 50 min

Seats
> Seat Blanks: 3 hr 55 min
> Foam: 1 hr 20 min
> Muslin: 4 hr 15 min
> Final Fabric: 7 hr

Total: 245 hr 15 min (~41 hrs per stool)
All, super nicely done. Woodwork, and upholstery.
 

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