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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Jim,
Glad to hear you are interested.

Brian,
If I miss something in the design process posts, let me know. It should be little different from what most people do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Captian,
I am a little nervous about getting all four legs to be square. I am thinking about glue up fixtures.

Finish is a long way off, but I have had my best luck with General Finishes wipe on products. My big question will be if I want to pre finish any (or all) parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Mike(s),
The design was inspired by chairs for our kitchen table. That helped narrow down the infinite design options. I'll show more in a future entry.

Ellen,
My one criticism of our kitchen chairs was the construction. These stools should be much sturdier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Thanks for the input Captian,
Actually, the side rails angle in forming a trapezoid and the rear legs are angled out. Combine that with the curved parts and that's where I start thinking about glue up jigs. I'll have to play around a bit when the time comes.
Good point about the joinery. The prototype is not glued up and it sits square. People have been making chairs that touch all four feet for a very long time. I ought to be able to figure it out.
Keep the suggestions coming - that's how I'll figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Hey Captain,

That's exactly how I have the joints set up - perpendicular mortises and angled tenons. I have a tenoning jig from Grizzly that works in most cases - special jigs for the curved parts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Thanks Lee, I need to put a blog entry out on the design and how I did it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
Thanks DAN!!

There are six of them under construction. We really have room for 5 around the island, but 6 can fit. Also, if I mess one up, I'll still have 5!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mahogany Kitchen Stool Project

Well, here we go. I have been working on the design and preparation of this project for 3 years. The final prototype was just completed.



This is my second prototype. The first one was a quick (that is a relative term) mock up to see if I had the size correct. I built this out of scrap 2×4s and screws. Pieces were only roughly shaped. After building this, we determined that it was about a half inch too tall.



The second prototype was built as a prelude to actual construction. Each stool has 42 mortise and tenon joints. Several of them are angled and others are on curved parts. By making a full prototype, I have a scale pattern to verify the layout of each piece before I cut into my lumber.



Also, I get a chance to make mistakes and learn. I ended up missing on three or four dimensions and had to patch parts up. I have chosen to form the curved parts by laminating thin strips. The two curved boards on the back formed very well, but the 5 slats did have some spring back. I'll need to adjust the form or move to thinner strips. Stay tuned on that one.

Finally, I get one last chance to check my design choices. In this case, my wife and I felt that the slats on the back were spaced a little too far apart. It ended up crowding the gap to the legs. I changed the design and moved the slats a little closer together.

I'll outline how I intend to proceed with this blog. I'll post updates on the construction as I go. Woodworking is a spare time activity for me. Weeks may go by with only a little activity. I'll post a few "flashback" entries where I will cover my design process.

I'll also keep a log of construction hours. This will not include design or prototyping time.

Cutting rough stock : 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs

Total so far: 9 hrs 20 min
And yes, I am enjoying the project. That is a good thing since it will be a long time to get more hours into using them as I have in making them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Begin Rough Cutting

Back in early November, I went to my favorite lumber yard and started looking at what kind of wood to use. I was interested in mahogany, but wanted to check out my options. They had some very nice ribbon mahogany. I went home and gave it some more thought. The next weekend, I made the plunge.



I had only one problem, I kept seeing pieces that looked too nice to pass up! I ended up with way more than I needed for this project. I can rationalize it that I saved gas by not making an extra trip ;) You can see 3 fir 2×4's on top of the stack. They ended up being the material for my prototype.

Even though I had plenty of material, I took it as a challenge to try to get the most use out of each and every board foot. I spent way too much time on this, but I packed in the pieces in the most compact cut layout I could. Here is the result after 3 or 4 iterations on my CAD system.



I'm hopeful I will end up with only small blocks of scrap and a big pile of sawdust!

Fast forward to last weekend. I finally was able to start cutting the legs. Here is where I ended up.



I got the width and thickness rough cut and then ran them through my planer. I learned something about my dial calipers. I bought a nice one with resolution down to 0.001 inches. The resolution makes it nice to know exactly what dimension I am at. On the other hand, I don't need to worry about being off by 0.001 or 0.002 inches. If I can't see the difference when I hold two pieces up to each other, I am happy.

Current time log:
Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs 15 min
Prepping laminations: 15 min

Total so far: 9 hrs 50 min
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Begin Rough Cutting

Back in early November, I went to my favorite lumber yard and started looking at what kind of wood to use. I was interested in mahogany, but wanted to check out my options. They had some very nice ribbon mahogany. I went home and gave it some more thought. The next weekend, I made the plunge.



I had only one problem, I kept seeing pieces that looked too nice to pass up! I ended up with way more than I needed for this project. I can rationalize it that I saved gas by not making an extra trip ;) You can see 3 fir 2×4's on top of the stack. They ended up being the material for my prototype.

Even though I had plenty of material, I took it as a challenge to try to get the most use out of each and every board foot. I spent way too much time on this, but I packed in the pieces in the most compact cut layout I could. Here is the result after 3 or 4 iterations on my CAD system.



I'm hopeful I will end up with only small blocks of scrap and a big pile of sawdust!

Fast forward to last weekend. I finally was able to start cutting the legs. Here is where I ended up.



I got the width and thickness rough cut and then ran them through my planer. I learned something about my dial calipers. I bought a nice one with resolution down to 0.001 inches. The resolution makes it nice to know exactly what dimension I am at. On the other hand, I don't need to worry about being off by 0.001 or 0.002 inches. If I can't see the difference when I hold two pieces up to each other, I am happy.

Current time log:
Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs 15 min
Prepping laminations: 15 min

Total so far: 9 hrs 50 min
Hi Jim,
The time log is elapsed time. In the cutting legs case, that is just under 50 minutes a piece for each of 6 sets of legs. Since the cutting also sets me up for making other pieces, the division of time is not all that precise.
I do take my time… It includes time studying each piece to figure out how to orient the grain. Several pieces have wavy grain that can nicely match the curve of the back legs.
I do not have a jointer so I place a straight board along my rough timber. I also am trying to minimize waste at the early stages. That means I check each piece to find which side bows out and then set the fence to remove a little as possible.
I also broke the milling of the legs up into two sessions. A few of the timbers had built in stresses and the pieces bowed after making the initial cuts. I cut everything oversize by ~1/8". After the wood relaxes for a day or so, I go through the straightening process again. Then it gets planed down to final width and thickness.

As to working with mahogany, this is my first time. This wood is really nice! It cuts well and leaves a crisp edge (more on that later). When I have a piece that is changing shape as I cut it, the blade scorches and it smells like hot butter!
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Begin Rough Cutting

Back in early November, I went to my favorite lumber yard and started looking at what kind of wood to use. I was interested in mahogany, but wanted to check out my options. They had some very nice ribbon mahogany. I went home and gave it some more thought. The next weekend, I made the plunge.



I had only one problem, I kept seeing pieces that looked too nice to pass up! I ended up with way more than I needed for this project. I can rationalize it that I saved gas by not making an extra trip ;) You can see 3 fir 2×4's on top of the stack. They ended up being the material for my prototype.

Even though I had plenty of material, I took it as a challenge to try to get the most use out of each and every board foot. I spent way too much time on this, but I packed in the pieces in the most compact cut layout I could. Here is the result after 3 or 4 iterations on my CAD system.



I'm hopeful I will end up with only small blocks of scrap and a big pile of sawdust!

Fast forward to last weekend. I finally was able to start cutting the legs. Here is where I ended up.



I got the width and thickness rough cut and then ran them through my planer. I learned something about my dial calipers. I bought a nice one with resolution down to 0.001 inches. The resolution makes it nice to know exactly what dimension I am at. On the other hand, I don't need to worry about being off by 0.001 or 0.002 inches. If I can't see the difference when I hold two pieces up to each other, I am happy.

Current time log:
Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs
Cutting legs to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
Cutting thin stock for seat back laminations: 3 hrs 15 min
Prepping laminations: 15 min

Total so far: 9 hrs 50 min
Hi Jim,

We plan on using an upholstered seats. The idea is we will change the fabric on the kitchen chairs at the same time. I would like to try a wood seat, but these stools are going to see a lot of use and I think the wood would get scratched pretty quickly.

My favorite lumber yard is Moxon Hardwoods - just across the 205 bridge. They are my favorite when it comes to hardwoods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Thanks Ellen!
Slow and steady - well more slow than steady ;)
But I am making progress. Usually I have more time in the fall & winter to get in the shop. This is still going to take a while.
You would think I could have worked 5 more minutes and hit the 100 hour mark! I don't know if I am half way there yet…
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Thanks PurpLev,
It is my first time using furniture grade mahogany. It has taken on a darker color just while sitting in the shop. I am glad I bought some extra when I started this project.
This is an African Mahogany known as Khaya.
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Hi Lenny - I hope they turn out as well as I intend. Glad to hear you were able to find an inspiration. Good luck on your project. Thanks for the compliments!
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #91 ·
Mortises and tenons - Making progress!!

Summer has flown by. I found a little time here and there to work on the stools. It never seemed like much, but when I look at the result I can see significant progress. I'll show how I spent my summer (when I was in the shop).

Preliminary Leg Shaping

Several of the leg pieces shifted shape during the rough cut process. The final shape of the back legs requires some material removal. I decided to shape the side that removed material from the center of the leg. If the wood shifted I could adjust the straight side. By leaving one side straight I still have a reference edge for locating the mortises.



Sure enough after a few days, about a third of the legs shifted somewhat. I set up a straight edge and ran the router along it to get a true edge back. The picture is not very good - you are supposed to see the offset in the mahogany.



I then was able to use the shape template and route the final shape on the legs.

Mortise Front Legs

I then waded into a seemingly endless stream of mortises and tenons. First up - the legs. I measured and drew out the location of each of the mortises. I finally got to put to use the mortiser I bought just for this project.



I followed up by cleaning up the mortise with a mortising chisel. Most of the work was cleaning out the bottom of the mortises.



After several days, I had a set of mortised front legs.



Tenon Rails - Round 1

I then focused on tenons for the rails to fit the new mortises. Six rail parts added up to 8 tenons (on each of 6 stools). Once again I need to keep close track of the parts to preserve all my effort to match the grain and colors. I mentioned before that I use a dot to indicate the top right front corner of each piece.



48 tenons later, I have the start of something that looks like it might become a stool for the kitchen.



Mortise Back Legs

Next up is all the mortises on the back legs.



More Rail Tenons

The angled tenons allowed me to create some interesting set ups for my tenoning jig. This one is set up so I can cut both sides.



Here is another set up.



After another set of tenons, I have six stools with four legs.



Mortise and Tenon Accent Posts

Next up is the 3 posts on each side. Mortises were cut and indexed with spacing blocks.



Here is a fit up with the accent posts installed. The bottom rails are all in place as well. Notice how the pile of parts on the bench is getting smaller?



Cutting Tenons on Curved Rails

I used the fixture for gluing the curved parts to hold the curved rails for cutting tenons. Some stop blocks and a cross cut sled worked great!



I would use shims to sneak up on the final tenon width.



Final Fit Up

After another assembly of the pieces you are caught up. The pile of parts on the bench is down to the seat back slats. They are up next!



Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hrs

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hrs 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hrs 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hrs 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hrs 35 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hrs 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hrs 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 10 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hrs
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hrs 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 10 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hrs
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 3 hr 50 min
> Tenon: 23 hrs 30 min

Total so far: 99 hrs 55 min (16+ hrs per stool)
Thanks AtomJack!
I hope my skills continue to be worthy of the quality of my materials. I "discovered' Greene & Greene a little over a year ago. Their story is an inspiration even though the design is not derived from their work.
Finishing is going to be a challenge. I am considering prefinishing - this would be a new experience for me. I feel like I am less than halfway done (hopefully close).
As to those character marks to come. I always struggle with this, but I found I really want to create useful pieces that are also beautiful. Signs of use mean I was able to create utility. Hope that makes sense. I am considering a brass trim for the lower stretcher…
 

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Discussion Starter · #158 ·
Assembling 6 stools with pre-finished parts

After I got the parts all finished, I was really excited to do a dry fit and see how everything looked. I didn't even bother to change into any shop clothes!

Glasses Wood Loom Hardwood Wood stain


As you can see, tongue position is important when dry fitting pre-finished parts.

Before I actually glued up an assembly, I dry fit the stool. The corner blocks are then set in place. The tenons on the corner blocks needed a little fitting to get them into position. Pilot holes for the screws were drilled and then the stool is disassembled. Then I set the parts out to make sure I have everything ready to go.

Wood Gas Hardwood Flooring Electric blue


I also make sure the clamps and clamping jigs are in order.

Hood Wood Bumper Gas Automotive exterior


Gluing up an entire stool at once requires a glue that has a loooonnnng open time. I am using epoxy. I learned about epoxy assembly from building kayaks a few years ago.

Fluid Liquid Packing materials Household supply Gas


This epoxy needs to mixed in a 2:1 ratio (resin:hardener) by volume. You can use pumps to meter out the portions. Others use scales that account for the ratio and density differences. I find it much easier to measure out volumes. I use old pill bottles to do this.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Highball glass Beer


I mark the left one to measure out a single part of the mixture. I then pour water to that level and transfer two parts into the right container and mark that level. I then add one more part and mark that level. I then empty the water out and dry it well. I then add resin to the first mark and hardener to the second mark.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Barware Ingredient


The epoxy needs a structural filler to create strong joints. I also added a little mahogany sanding sawdust to tint the mixture. The entire tub of sawdust was collecting from sanding all the parts . I reserve some of the epoxy to pre-wet the joint and the rest is transferred to a cup and the fillers are added.

Cup Drink Gas Paint Cylinder


I use an acid brush to pre-wet the tenon and the mortise. This is a very thin layer as I do not want to deal with a lot of squeeze out. As I understand it, the pre-wetting allows the wood to absorb some epoxy and helps prevent epoxy being wicked away from the joint.

Wood Water Musical instrument Metal Close-up


Wood Fluid Wood stain Musical instrument Hardwood


I then spread the thickened mixture on the walls of the mortise.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Metal Wood stain


The assembly sequence is the same as described in the gluing jig post just before this one. After the parts are clamped, the corner blocks were glued and screwed into position.

Wood Hardwood Composite material Wood stain Engineering


The masonite surfaces on the clamping pads worked very well. I had no marks from clamping. There was very little epoxy squeeze out. When this did happen, ithe wax on the parts made clean up quite successful. The final results looks very nice.

Furniture Chair Wood Outdoor furniture Comfort


I paid close attention to making sure all four legs were in contact with the floor after clamping. I unclamped it and it was rock solid on the shop floor. When I brought the first stool into the house and tried to rock it, there was a slight "tick-tick-tick" as I wiggled it. Rats - not perfect, but close. Shop floor must not be flat. With the next stool, I made sure I found a perfectly flat spot on the shop floor.
The second stool was dead square - even when turning 90 degrees. Brought it into the house and it was rock solid. Then I put it in place the first stool sat - "tick-tick-tick".

Ah- HA! My kitchen floor is not flat!! The rocking is really slight and goes away when I put my weight on the stool.

They look really nice and are now ready for seats.

Wood Wood stain Varnish Hardwood Rectangle


Light Wood Wood stain Line Hardwood


They all look good sitting in their final home.

Chair Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


Furniture Wood Chair Flooring Wood stain


The finishing process took about 11 hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 hr 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 hr 30 min
> Finish: 12 hr 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 1 hr 15 min
> Holes: 1 hr 30 min

Frame assembly
> Remove Masking Tape: 1 hr 30 min
> Dry Fitting: 4 hr 20 min
> Glue up: 6 hr 50 min

Total so far: 229 hr 5 min (~38 hrs per stool)
 

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Discussion Starter · #166 ·
Assembling 6 stools with pre-finished parts

After I got the parts all finished, I was really excited to do a dry fit and see how everything looked. I didn't even bother to change into any shop clothes!



As you can see, tongue position is important when dry fitting pre-finished parts.

Before I actually glued up an assembly, I dry fit the stool. The corner blocks are then set in place. The tenons on the corner blocks needed a little fitting to get them into position. Pilot holes for the screws were drilled and then the stool is disassembled. Then I set the parts out to make sure I have everything ready to go.



I also make sure the clamps and clamping jigs are in order.



Gluing up an entire stool at once requires a glue that has a loooonnnng open time. I am using epoxy. I learned about epoxy assembly from building kayaks a few years ago.



This epoxy needs to mixed in a 2:1 ratio (resin:hardener) by volume. You can use pumps to meter out the portions. Others use scales that account for the ratio and density differences. I find it much easier to measure out volumes. I use old pill bottles to do this.



I mark the left one to measure out a single part of the mixture. I then pour water to that level and transfer two parts into the right container and mark that level. I then add one more part and mark that level. I then empty the water out and dry it well. I then add resin to the first mark and hardener to the second mark.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Barware Ingredient


The epoxy needs a structural filler to create strong joints. I also added a little mahogany sanding sawdust to tint the mixture. The entire tub of sawdust was collecting from sanding all the parts . I reserve some of the epoxy to pre-wet the joint and the rest is transferred to a cup and the fillers are added.

Cup Drink Gas Paint Cylinder


I use an acid brush to pre-wet the tenon and the mortise. This is a very thin layer as I do not want to deal with a lot of squeeze out. As I understand it, the pre-wetting allows the wood to absorb some epoxy and helps prevent epoxy being wicked away from the joint.

Wood Water Musical instrument Metal Close-up


Wood Fluid Wood stain Musical instrument Hardwood


I then spread the thickened mixture on the walls of the mortise.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Metal Wood stain


The assembly sequence is the same as described in the gluing jig post just before this one. After the parts are clamped, the corner blocks were glued and screwed into position.

Wood Hardwood Composite material Wood stain Engineering


The masonite surfaces on the clamping pads worked very well. I had no marks from clamping. There was very little epoxy squeeze out. When this did happen, ithe wax on the parts made clean up quite successful. The final results looks very nice.

Furniture Chair Wood Outdoor furniture Comfort


I paid close attention to making sure all four legs were in contact with the floor after clamping. I unclamped it and it was rock solid on the shop floor. When I brought the first stool into the house and tried to rock it, there was a slight "tick-tick-tick" as I wiggled it. Rats - not perfect, but close. Shop floor must not be flat. With the next stool, I made sure I found a perfectly flat spot on the shop floor.
The second stool was dead square - even when turning 90 degrees. Brought it into the house and it was rock solid. Then I put it in place the first stool sat - "tick-tick-tick".

Ah- HA! My kitchen floor is not flat!! The rocking is really slight and goes away when I put my weight on the stool.

They look really nice and are now ready for seats.

Wood Wood stain Varnish Hardwood Rectangle


Light Wood Wood stain Line Hardwood


They all look good sitting in their final home.

Chair Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


Furniture Wood Chair Flooring Wood stain


The finishing process took about 11 hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 hr 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 hr 30 min
> Finish: 12 hr 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 1 hr 15 min
> Holes: 1 hr 30 min

Frame assembly
> Remove Masking Tape: 1 hr 30 min
> Dry Fitting: 4 hr 20 min
> Glue up: 6 hr 50 min

Total so far: 229 hr 5 min (~38 hrs per stool)
Thanks for the comments everyone - they mean a lot.

Mike - Thanks - after 30 years of engineering work, it kind of shows up in whatever I do!

Roger - Upholstering the seats is up next. That will be a new experience for me. Then - at last - they can go to work.

whitewulf - Thanks - I kept a time log on one other project and was surprised by how far off my initial guess was. I don't normally bother with it either, but thought it would be fun for the blog.

lew - Yes, that is where they will live. We'll have to see if we picked the right color for the fabric!!

Kay - Thanks! I'll be well into the 40's by the time the seats are done. I would end up with a pretty low hourly wages at $500 each - but I am not trying to be efficient. It is more about having fun for me. I think you got a pretty fair deal…

Jeff - Thanks - I'm getting there!

Paul - I'm honored to be quoted! <grin>
 

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3,089 Posts
Discussion Starter · #168 ·
Assembling 6 stools with pre-finished parts

After I got the parts all finished, I was really excited to do a dry fit and see how everything looked. I didn't even bother to change into any shop clothes!

Glasses Wood Loom Hardwood Wood stain


As you can see, tongue position is important when dry fitting pre-finished parts.

Before I actually glued up an assembly, I dry fit the stool. The corner blocks are then set in place. The tenons on the corner blocks needed a little fitting to get them into position. Pilot holes for the screws were drilled and then the stool is disassembled. Then I set the parts out to make sure I have everything ready to go.

Wood Gas Hardwood Flooring Electric blue


I also make sure the clamps and clamping jigs are in order.

Hood Wood Bumper Gas Automotive exterior


Gluing up an entire stool at once requires a glue that has a loooonnnng open time. I am using epoxy. I learned about epoxy assembly from building kayaks a few years ago.

Fluid Liquid Packing materials Household supply Gas


This epoxy needs to mixed in a 2:1 ratio (resin:hardener) by volume. You can use pumps to meter out the portions. Others use scales that account for the ratio and density differences. I find it much easier to measure out volumes. I use old pill bottles to do this.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Highball glass Beer


I mark the left one to measure out a single part of the mixture. I then pour water to that level and transfer two parts into the right container and mark that level. I then add one more part and mark that level. I then empty the water out and dry it well. I then add resin to the first mark and hardener to the second mark.

Tableware Drinkware Liquid Barware Ingredient


The epoxy needs a structural filler to create strong joints. I also added a little mahogany sanding sawdust to tint the mixture. The entire tub of sawdust was collecting from sanding all the parts . I reserve some of the epoxy to pre-wet the joint and the rest is transferred to a cup and the fillers are added.

Cup Drink Gas Paint Cylinder


I use an acid brush to pre-wet the tenon and the mortise. This is a very thin layer as I do not want to deal with a lot of squeeze out. As I understand it, the pre-wetting allows the wood to absorb some epoxy and helps prevent epoxy being wicked away from the joint.

Wood Water Musical instrument Metal Close-up


Wood Fluid Wood stain Musical instrument Hardwood


I then spread the thickened mixture on the walls of the mortise.

Wood Natural material Hardwood Metal Wood stain


The assembly sequence is the same as described in the gluing jig post just before this one. After the parts are clamped, the corner blocks were glued and screwed into position.

Wood Hardwood Composite material Wood stain Engineering


The masonite surfaces on the clamping pads worked very well. I had no marks from clamping. There was very little epoxy squeeze out. When this did happen, ithe wax on the parts made clean up quite successful. The final results looks very nice.

Furniture Chair Wood Outdoor furniture Comfort


I paid close attention to making sure all four legs were in contact with the floor after clamping. I unclamped it and it was rock solid on the shop floor. When I brought the first stool into the house and tried to rock it, there was a slight "tick-tick-tick" as I wiggled it. Rats - not perfect, but close. Shop floor must not be flat. With the next stool, I made sure I found a perfectly flat spot on the shop floor.
The second stool was dead square - even when turning 90 degrees. Brought it into the house and it was rock solid. Then I put it in place the first stool sat - "tick-tick-tick".

Ah- HA! My kitchen floor is not flat!! The rocking is really slight and goes away when I put my weight on the stool.

They look really nice and are now ready for seats.

Wood Wood stain Varnish Hardwood Rectangle


Light Wood Wood stain Line Hardwood


They all look good sitting in their final home.

Chair Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain


Furniture Wood Chair Flooring Wood stain


The finishing process took about 11 hours.

=================================================

Current time log:

Cutting rough stock: 2 hr

Legs
> Cutting to width and thickness: 4 hr 20 min
> Cut to final length: 3 hr 30 min
> Shaping: 5 hr 50 min
> Mortises: 10 hr 35 min
> Sand & radius edges: 19 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 10 min
> Prep for finish: 1 hr 25 min
> Finish: 12 h 15 min

Seat Back and Back Rest
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 3 hr 35 min
> Prepping laminations: 8 hr 40 min
> Glue up Laminations: 3 hr 50 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 2 hr 25 min
> Tenon: 5 hr 40 min
> Mortises: 5 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 6 hr 10 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 20 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 20 min
> Finish: 2 h 45 min

Back Slats
> Cutting thin stock for laminations: 1 hr 55 min
> Prepping laminations: 3 hr
> Glue up Laminations: 6 hr 5 min
> Trim Laminated Parts: 30 min
> Tenon: 2 hr 50 min
> Sand: 7 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 1 hr 30 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 40 min
> Finish: 4 hr 35 min

Lower rail parts
> Cut to width and thickness: 10 hr
> Cut to length: 1 hr 30 min
> Mortise: 4 hr 35 min
> Tenon: 28 hr 30 min
> Sand & radius edges: 15 hr 35 min
> Oxidize and Final sanding: 3 hr 40 min
> Mask & Prep for finish: 2 hr 30 min
> Finish: 12 hr 5 min

Corner Blocks
> Cut to size: 1 hr 50 min
> Shape: 1 hr 50 min
> Tenons: 1 hr 15 min
> Holes: 1 hr 30 min

Frame assembly
> Remove Masking Tape: 1 hr 30 min
> Dry Fitting: 4 hr 20 min
> Glue up: 6 hr 50 min

Total so far: 229 hr 5 min (~38 hrs per stool)
Thanks kiefer! I am enjoying sharing the journey with all of you.

Now, I am in the learning phases of foam shaping. There is always something new to discover!
 

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