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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Double stack

An excellent way to increase the speed and efficiency of your shaper when running rails and stiles is to stack your cutters. With the right set-up and coping jig you can quickly switch from rails to stiles and back again with no down time or resetting.

It all starts with your cutters and an appropriate width spacer.



Here I am using Amana's mission style combo with a 3/4" spacer in between. More on this later.

After finding the spot you want for the groove, run your stiles being sure to mark the pieces to keep reference for the tops. I use a power feeder for this part of the operation. Anyone who uses a shaper will greatly benefit from the use of one, not to mention it keeps the fingers well away.



Here is the real trick to this set-up. The coping sled. It consists of an old miter gauge for angle adjustment, two pieces of MDF adjusted for thickness, destaco clamps and a sheet of sandpaper.



If your coping sleds bottom piece of material is the same thickness as your stock, and your spacer is the same thickness as the top piece, this sets up the top cutter for coping. This is why it's impotant to mark the tops on the stiles. Also, prior to running any stock, after everything is adjusted, I double stick a sacrificial piece of wood to the leading edge of the sled. This helps to tame the tear out.



This method works quite well for me. Since I am attempting to make money cutting wood, any time saved is more money made. I will add that when doing rails and stile with an actual profile, I cope the ends first since any blow out is taken care of by running the stiles. There are ways to do it in reverse but that will have to wait for another day. Hopefully someone can use this information to help speed things up or just to make the job of running door parts a little less frustrating.



Parts ran for panel ends.
 

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Double stack

An excellent way to increase the speed and efficiency of your shaper when running rails and stiles is to stack your cutters. With the right set-up and coping jig you can quickly switch from rails to stiles and back again with no down time or resetting.

It all starts with your cutters and an appropriate width spacer.



Here I am using Amana's mission style combo with a 3/4" spacer in between. More on this later.

After finding the spot you want for the groove, run your stiles being sure to mark the pieces to keep reference for the tops. I use a power feeder for this part of the operation. Anyone who uses a shaper will greatly benefit from the use of one, not to mention it keeps the fingers well away.



Here is the real trick to this set-up. The coping sled. It consists of an old miter gauge for angle adjustment, two pieces of MDF adjusted for thickness, destaco clamps and a sheet of sandpaper.



If your coping sleds bottom piece of material is the same thickness as your stock, and your spacer is the same thickness as the top piece, this sets up the top cutter for coping. This is why it's impotant to mark the tops on the stiles. Also, prior to running any stock, after everything is adjusted, I double stick a sacrificial piece of wood to the leading edge of the sled. This helps to tame the tear out.



This method works quite well for me. Since I am attempting to make money cutting wood, any time saved is more money made. I will add that when doing rails and stile with an actual profile, I cope the ends first since any blow out is taken care of by running the stiles. There are ways to do it in reverse but that will have to wait for another day. Hopefully someone can use this information to help speed things up or just to make the job of running door parts a little less frustrating.



Parts ran for panel ends.
Good idea rhett
 

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Double stack

An excellent way to increase the speed and efficiency of your shaper when running rails and stiles is to stack your cutters. With the right set-up and coping jig you can quickly switch from rails to stiles and back again with no down time or resetting.

It all starts with your cutters and an appropriate width spacer.



Here I am using Amana's mission style combo with a 3/4" spacer in between. More on this later.

After finding the spot you want for the groove, run your stiles being sure to mark the pieces to keep reference for the tops. I use a power feeder for this part of the operation. Anyone who uses a shaper will greatly benefit from the use of one, not to mention it keeps the fingers well away.



Here is the real trick to this set-up. The coping sled. It consists of an old miter gauge for angle adjustment, two pieces of MDF adjusted for thickness, destaco clamps and a sheet of sandpaper.



If your coping sleds bottom piece of material is the same thickness as your stock, and your spacer is the same thickness as the top piece, this sets up the top cutter for coping. This is why it's impotant to mark the tops on the stiles. Also, prior to running any stock, after everything is adjusted, I double stick a sacrificial piece of wood to the leading edge of the sled. This helps to tame the tear out.



This method works quite well for me. Since I am attempting to make money cutting wood, any time saved is more money made. I will add that when doing rails and stile with an actual profile, I cope the ends first since any blow out is taken care of by running the stiles. There are ways to do it in reverse but that will have to wait for another day. Hopefully someone can use this information to help speed things up or just to make the job of running door parts a little less frustrating.



Parts ran for panel ends.
thats a good idea but what about the stress on the spindle bearings when running the rails through.with the cutters sitting at the end of the shaft i would think it puts a bit of stress on them.i dont know if this is true but just seems like it would put stress on them
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Double stack

An excellent way to increase the speed and efficiency of your shaper when running rails and stiles is to stack your cutters. With the right set-up and coping jig you can quickly switch from rails to stiles and back again with no down time or resetting.

It all starts with your cutters and an appropriate width spacer.



Here I am using Amana's mission style combo with a 3/4" spacer in between. More on this later.

After finding the spot you want for the groove, run your stiles being sure to mark the pieces to keep reference for the tops. I use a power feeder for this part of the operation. Anyone who uses a shaper will greatly benefit from the use of one, not to mention it keeps the fingers well away.



Here is the real trick to this set-up. The coping sled. It consists of an old miter gauge for angle adjustment, two pieces of MDF adjusted for thickness, destaco clamps and a sheet of sandpaper.



If your coping sleds bottom piece of material is the same thickness as your stock, and your spacer is the same thickness as the top piece, this sets up the top cutter for coping. This is why it's impotant to mark the tops on the stiles. Also, prior to running any stock, after everything is adjusted, I double stick a sacrificial piece of wood to the leading edge of the sled. This helps to tame the tear out.



This method works quite well for me. Since I am attempting to make money cutting wood, any time saved is more money made. I will add that when doing rails and stile with an actual profile, I cope the ends first since any blow out is taken care of by running the stiles. There are ways to do it in reverse but that will have to wait for another day. Hopefully someone can use this information to help speed things up or just to make the job of running door parts a little less frustrating.



Parts ran for panel ends.
I do not think a cutter with such a small diameter would do much damage. Plus it really isn't a very heavy cut.

I am running a 3/4" spindle 3" long. The machine is rated for up to a 1" spindle at 4" long. If it breaks I'll buy another, that little grizzly has more than paid itself off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
 

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Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
Very impressive! Next time one of my tools lays down I'm gonna contact you to see if you'll talk me through the fix. I'm not very mechanical at all!
 

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Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
I was using my router and the brush just fell out. I finally got it back in and all is well now, but I had a dickens of a time getting the spring pushed down and the cap on fast enough so it didn't pop back out like a Jack in the box. What is your trick for getting it back? Thanks for the article. Very well done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
Vickii

That is a tricky and frustrating step.

Here is my method. With my left hand, I take a long screw driver or awl and seat/press the bushing into its spot. With my right hand I then take the cap and place it on its side, pressing on the bushing. I quickly pull the screw driver out while flipping the cap down.

Not sure if that is the correct way, but it works for me 90% of the time. The other 10% is cursing at an inanimate object.

Once again, I urge everyone to alteast try and fix their broken tools. Most is simple technology and the part that breaks is usually mechanical. Check out ereplacement parts dot com. There you can look at schemtaics for most any tool and see how they're made.

As my father used to say, "If you broke it, atleast try to fix it. Its hard to make something broke, broker."

Be Good
Rhett
 

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Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
Thanks for the info and the videos
 

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Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
Thanks for explaining Rhett. That's sorta what i did, but it took several attempts. I had to bend the little flanges on the top out a bit so they'd catch also.

I agree with you on the trying to fix it. I don't know a lot about machines, but when they are broken I always figured I can't hurt them any worse so I have a look. Sometimes I get lucky.
 

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Router Bearing Replacement: Fix It, Don't Trash it!

Today my 690 died, big sparks, some smoke and then brrrrrrrraaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhh.

With play at the bit, it was obvious a bearing gave out. Being from the school of try to fix it before you trash it, I got to work. First things was to remove the brushes from both sides. A flat tip screw driver makes quick work of this simple step. The brushes are kept under tension by springs. They must be removed so the armature will come out freely. These are usually the first things to wear out on an electric router. Which is why they were designed to be so simple to replace.

Audio equipment Wood Gadget Material property Camera lens


Next loosen the two screws from the top of the housing

Audio equipment Office equipment Auto part Automotive tire Gas


Lift and let it drape to the side as you remove the two additional screws.

Electrical wiring Gas Bicycle part Cable Auto part


Gently tap up and around on the housing. There is a small bearing on the top of the armature that is seated in there, it should take very little effort to get the housing off.

Gas Automotive tire Auto part Metal Audio equipment


Here is the top bearing, check it and replace if necessary. This one is fine.

Automotive tire Finger Household hardware Thumb Gas


The next step is a bit trickier but not difficult by any means. The collet nut is going to be on tight. An impact wrench would make short work of this step but I don't have one. Instead, I applied heat to the nut in order to expand the metal a bit.

Circuit component Gas Cylinder Composite material Metal


Wrapping the end of the armature in a shop rag and putting a 1 1/8 socket on the nut, I then proceeded to bust mine. It's on there tight…

Cylinder Gas Nickel Auto part Metal


Here is the nut removed.

Rim Bicycle part Automotive wheel system Gas Machine


Now its time to unseat the armature. A bearing press would be ideal for this step, but once again, I don't have one. A few taps on the metal bolt should drop it right out. Be carefull not to hit the threads and make sure your ready to catch the armature when it falls.

Automotive lighting Automotive tire Tableware Auto part Wood


Almost there, now you can see the lower bearing. It is held in with a pinch ring. There is a special tool for removing them, but sharp needle nose pliers and a small flat tip screw driver will yield the same result. Once removed, flip the housing over and put a socket, of the same diameter as the inner race, on the bearing.

Automotive tire Wood Gas Auto part Circle


A few taps with a hammer and out it will fall. Here is the shot bearing.

Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Thumb


Total time invested so far, 15 minutes with taking pics. The part, with shipping, is under $20. That's a lot cheaper than a new router. When your self employeed, every dollar not spent is almost like a dollar earned.

Once the bearing arrives I will walk you back through putting it together. If I don't make it back, here is the big trick. Put your bearing in the freezer, overnight, prior to install and it should easily slip back into it's seat.

Just because tool companies designs their tools to eventually fail, that doen't mean we have to throw them away. Atleast TRY to fix them first. Even if you can't get it to work again, you will have learned something about how the tool works and will have made an effort.

In todays world, even a failed effort is more than most people will do.

Be Good
Rhett
Good post.

I had a similar experience wit a random orbital sander the bearing seized and it turned into a disk sander'

I was amazed at the time and bewildered as well.
Needed to use it in its proper role so dismantled it wondering what had gone wrong, I found a defective bearing to be the fault went to the bearing shop with it.
Bought an off the shelf product, sealed specifically designed for the job and ready to go for $7.00

Put it back together again and it works better than before the problem

yee ha!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
 

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Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
I don't claim to be an expert.
Far from it.
But there are few guys making videos out there who are less knowledgeable in woodworking then a trained chimp.
And, unfortunately, they are messing up the newer guys who are even less knowledgeable.
 

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Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
That is great for vertical and using the same square to reference off the miter slot does for horizontal.
 

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Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
That's the internet for you,
A little Knowledge is dangerous comes to mind.
It almost mandatory when watching some videos that you know better in the first instance and disregard the information presented unless its something you didn't know.
Always rely on the "Its too good to be true" as in most cases it is not true and borders on a dangerous practice or dangerous event.

Our tools and also our timber are very precious to us and we don't need to be wasting either by being mislead, causing injury and ruining our projects.

Good post that's the sort of exposure required.

Regards

Robert Brennan
 

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Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
Handy tip. I'll be sure to remember it.
 

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Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
If your insert isn't square to the top, wouldn't it angle the cut as it ride over it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
Use the straight edge of the combo square to level the insert with the top. Most will have adjustment screws on the four corners. If you are ripping wood, narrower than the thin side of the insert, I would make sure the length of your stock, easily spans iron to iron.
 

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Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
Right…so if the insert is level with the top, then there's no issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Can't bite my tongue.... Squaring up a tablesaw blade

Recently, I watched some of a woodworking video. I say some, because once I saw the presenters method for checking square on the TS, I turned it off.

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument Wood Plucked string instruments


This is not squaring up a blade in reference to the top, it is getting square in reference to the insert. Little demonstration on how this will steer you wrong. Square, but not 90 degrees to the top.

Wood Art Headgear Metal Carmine


If you have a quality combination square, this is the way you square a table saw blade. It's the way I was shown and I believe it to be the most acurate method.

Automotive tire Bumper Bicycle part Motor vehicle Automotive exterior


Surely this has been in a magazine article somewhere….. Just bringing it to the attention of any interested party.

Be Good
Rhett
The insert "floats" in the top and is not a solid or consistent reference point for square. For the most accuracy in any stationary machine, square from a known flat, rigidly attached surface with the largest square that will work.
 

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