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Hi all, I would like to solve my lumber storage issue once and for all and was hoping I could get some good suggestions. I have pretty much ruled out establishing racks on a wall. The only wall available has windows.

I have been thinking of making a rolling cart with one half shelves and the other half sheet good storage. Any advise, suggestions, examples, or plan recommendations would be most welcome.
 

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I guess a lot would depend on how much wood you have on hand. If it weighed more than say 500 lbs, you would have a tough time building a cart for it, not to mention moving it when you needed too.

The carts I have seen so far were mainly designed for sheet goods. It would not be difficult to adapt them to hold lumber as well. The lumber would probably have to be stacked in the middle, to avoid overweighting the cart to one side.

I would try to find an area I could build a lumber rack in. Maybe you could move the tools and such around to allow this to happen. Just a thought.
 

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The rolling cart is a good idea.

I would also suggest positioning all of your wall cabinets so the tops are at the same position. Then, you can lay boards on top of the cabinets. This could potentially give you at least 12" of space all the way around your shop.

If you have a storage shed, you could obviously put wood in there. However, if there's not enough room, you could build an "addition" onto your shed that is enclosable. Something where you can lay boards flat and slide them in and out from an access door. This could also be built on the side of your house. Put a small inclined roof on it so water is shed away.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would hope I could keep it under 500 lbs. I have to share the garage space with my wife and kids. This means I might get one and a half walls. Good idea relative to using the space on top of cabinets. Been storing some small items there, but they could be moved.

I'm thinking of a cart that has perhaps 3 sections. Center is for full sheets, one side is for partial sheets and the other side has shelfs. I was thinking of using a commercial rack such as those you would find at woodcraft to hold the lumber.

Overall demensions are perhaps 8' long 30" wide and 60" tall. This would allow me to use the 55" shelf brackets.

There was an interesting sheet good roller in Woodsmith #167 (pg. 5) that could be placed in the end areas where sheets roll in and out. It is basically a 1" PVC pipe with a 1/2" black pipe in the center. Looks cheap, easy, and useful.

What do you all think?
 

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did you see the WoodWhisperer's shop? He has something like a room divider set up that holds his plywoods etc. Not sure what your shop space is like or if this works but you might be able to play with the idea to get a double-service out of it.
 

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Some shops say to stand the plywood up on end to store. Other people say build a cart and store it on its side. Both claim it prevents warping, but storing it flat is the only way I know to do that.

I guess a lot depends on your space. If you could store your sheets upright in a corner, then your cart could be used for storing your lumber only. Might be a help.
 

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Overhead would be good if you're not dealing with full sheets of 3/4 ply or MDF, otherwise you'd probably be crushed trying to get them down. I currently have mine stored on the side. It works well as long as the ply can be stacked tightly. If it is allowed to lean it will bend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I've ruled out overhead in my case. We are already storing some other stuff there and I am worried about the weight. I think I will build a rolling cart and perhaps use some shelves high on a couple of walls and perhaps the tops of the cabinets.

I'm trying to keep the amount of lumber on hand to a reasonable amout. Hopefully, I can be successful.

I've been going through all of my old magazines looking for plans. Hopefully I will get started soon.
 

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Not sure if you can open this (and I know that you don't want wall storage) but for anyone doing research, this might be of interest). I hope it opens for you.
 

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I went to my local big box lumber store,lets just say it has a" Ho"at the beginning a "de" in the middle and an "ot" at the end and asked if by chance would they happen to have any shelving units that had accidently been run into by a way ward fork lift driver,wouldn't you know they did have some of their heavy duty adjustable shelves out back that had been bent up do to an employee with lead in his/her foot. I picked them up for the price of scrap,took them home,straightened out the bent legs and put some locking casters on the legs and I now have a heavy duty roll around lumber storage units with adjustable shelves. The best part is as long as there's no shortage of forklift drivers with heavy feet and low common sence there will always be a supply of shelving units thats needing repair.
Sincerely,
Jim at
Clark Customs
 
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