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LSD Hickory Bench

This workbench has had an interesting history.


The Hickory was donated by National Lumber Supply. This Hickory makes up the majority of the top. The trestle (base) is constructed in Ash. The height was set for shorter students, actually using a student in one of the fundamentals classes as a model for the bench height. The height is around 30" - so considerably shorter than our normal benches.

The bench trestle got it's start as a demo for the Fall 09 workbench class. The joinery is standard mortise and tenon for bases. I made a choice at the time to have some natural edge being exposed on the left hand side. As the bench has progressed this may have been a mistake. Ash ended up being a great choice for the trestle as it is relatively inexpensive and is a nice strong wood for the joinery. The fifth leg on the left is where I encourage students to have a little fun. This particular fifth leg goes a little over the top.

The chevron inlay on the top is Wenge and Yellowheart. This itself has a history (at least the way I remember it) that is quite interesting. My Harley is Yellow and Black. Pat (shop manager) thought it would be funny, to glue up some Yellowheart and Wenge and make a pen. The pen idea grew into a large unusual turned column. Terry Bridwell turned the column and when I was trying to figure out a fifth leg for the trestle - it seemed a natural and challenging choice. The chevron inlay was my attempt to tie the top to the bottom from a visual sense.

I admit I got carried away for the infield by the shoulder vise - it just couldn't be helped.

The "loose" Dovetail pins came from a opportunity when Mike was working on the very nice Ace of Purple Heart bench. The outside portion of the tool-tray had been cut too short, the loose dovetail pins allowed us to stretch the wood enough.



The name came from the effect the combination has on your eyes. Looking at the chevron pattern and the infield can really make you feel dizzy. I should probably apologize now for the headaches it may cause in the future. - sorry
 

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LSD Hickory Bench

This workbench has had an interesting history.


The Hickory was donated by National Lumber Supply. This Hickory makes up the majority of the top. The trestle (base) is constructed in Ash. The height was set for shorter students, actually using a student in one of the fundamentals classes as a model for the bench height. The height is around 30" - so considerably shorter than our normal benches.

The bench trestle got it's start as a demo for the Fall 09 workbench class. The joinery is standard mortise and tenon for bases. I made a choice at the time to have some natural edge being exposed on the left hand side. As the bench has progressed this may have been a mistake. Ash ended up being a great choice for the trestle as it is relatively inexpensive and is a nice strong wood for the joinery. The fifth leg on the left is where I encourage students to have a little fun. This particular fifth leg goes a little over the top.

The chevron inlay on the top is Wenge and Yellowheart. This itself has a history (at least the way I remember it) that is quite interesting. My Harley is Yellow and Black. Pat (shop manager) thought it would be funny, to glue up some Yellowheart and Wenge and make a pen. The pen idea grew into a large unusual turned column. Terry Bridwell turned the column and when I was trying to figure out a fifth leg for the trestle - it seemed a natural and challenging choice. The chevron inlay was my attempt to tie the top to the bottom from a visual sense.

I admit I got carried away for the infield by the shoulder vise - it just couldn't be helped.

The "loose" Dovetail pins came from a opportunity when Mike was working on the very nice Ace of Purple Heart bench. The outside portion of the tool-tray had been cut too short, the loose dovetail pins allowed us to stretch the wood enough.



The name came from the effect the combination has on your eyes. Looking at the chevron pattern and the infield can really make you feel dizzy. I should probably apologize now for the headaches it may cause in the future. - sorry
FYI, your pictures are not showing up when I open this blog.
 

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LSD Hickory Bench

This workbench has had an interesting history.


The Hickory was donated by National Lumber Supply. This Hickory makes up the majority of the top. The trestle (base) is constructed in Ash. The height was set for shorter students, actually using a student in one of the fundamentals classes as a model for the bench height. The height is around 30" - so considerably shorter than our normal benches.

The bench trestle got it's start as a demo for the Fall 09 workbench class. The joinery is standard mortise and tenon for bases. I made a choice at the time to have some natural edge being exposed on the left hand side. As the bench has progressed this may have been a mistake. Ash ended up being a great choice for the trestle as it is relatively inexpensive and is a nice strong wood for the joinery. The fifth leg on the left is where I encourage students to have a little fun. This particular fifth leg goes a little over the top.

The chevron inlay on the top is Wenge and Yellowheart. This itself has a history (at least the way I remember it) that is quite interesting. My Harley is Yellow and Black. Pat (shop manager) thought it would be funny, to glue up some Yellowheart and Wenge and make a pen. The pen idea grew into a large unusual turned column. Terry Bridwell turned the column and when I was trying to figure out a fifth leg for the trestle - it seemed a natural and challenging choice. The chevron inlay was my attempt to tie the top to the bottom from a visual sense.

I admit I got carried away for the infield by the shoulder vise - it just couldn't be helped.

The "loose" Dovetail pins came from a opportunity when Mike was working on the very nice Ace of Purple Heart bench. The outside portion of the tool-tray had been cut too short, the loose dovetail pins allowed us to stretch the wood enough.



The name came from the effect the combination has on your eyes. Looking at the chevron pattern and the infield can really make you feel dizzy. I should probably apologize now for the headaches it may cause in the future. - sorry
Cool far out totally awesome
 
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