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Hi all,

I just wanted to share with everyone something I tried, which in my opinion, worked quite well. My workshop is in the basement of an old house. Often times, it feels more like a cave than a shop. Anyways, I had several fluorescent light fixtures which provided a reasonable amount of light, but I had problems with shadows. I would routinely find myself standing between my work and the light, and therefore create a shadow over the work. After some thought and research, I decided to try out some LED strips for lighting. I bought a 50 meter long coil of LED strip, and attached it to the underside of every joist (navigating many obstacles along the way). This LED light strip runs on 120V, and just simply plugs into a regular outlet. This particular strip is said to emit 300 lumens per meter, and was affordable, costing $85 for the entire 50 meter coil. I think the results are great. There is plenty of light and very little shadows. The only downside is that it does give a Christmas look to the shop.

Maybe this lighting option will prove useful for someone else. Thanks to everyone on this site for sharing so much. I love this site.

Building Electricity Gas Beam Engineering
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I purchased the LED strip from Lighting Ever. Its a strip of daylight white 3528 LEDs for 120V, 50 M long (4100064-dw-us). The item can be found here. I've had these up for a little over 2 months and I think they are great. No issues yet.

Let me know if you have any other questions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the update TheLastDeadMouse. I will be interested to see your pictures.

I'm not lobbying anyone to convert to LED strip lights, but I think they are a very good option nonetheless. The advantages that I see are:
1) Very disperse light, eliminating shadows
2) Low power consumption. In my case, the 50M strip equates to 15,000 lumens or roughly 10×100W incandescent bulbs. The reported wattage for the strip is 4.8W/M or 240W total.
3) Relatively inexpensive. I calculate roughly $1 for 200 lumens. You don't need to buy or install any fixtures. Nor replace any bulbs.

Additional benefits to me are that due to my very low ceilings. I gained some headspace. And, I no longer have to worry about breaking lights by accidentally hitting them with a piece of wood or tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
MrRon,
As many have pointed out in this thread, there are multiple options for LED lights. But, fundamentally, there is no reason why you couldn't get enough light. As a ball park calculation, I have a roughly 300 sf shop and lighting equivalent to 15,000 lumens, this suggests that you would need roughly 60,000 lumens in your shop. Your ceilings are higher, so more light wouldn't hurt. Depending on whether you want to simply replace the bulbs in your existing fixtures or install strip lighting, this may or may not be doable. If you tell us more info on your current lighting situation, people might have some good ideas for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
How did you wire them? Are they all on one switch and one breaker? Or did you break them up?
I wired up a normal receptacle box in the ceiling and the LED strip plugs into that with a normal 2-prong plug. The entire length (50 meters) is powered through that one plug, and it's controlled by a wall switch. The power draw is pretty reasonable. I don't remember exactly, but somewhere in the 200 Watt range. There should be detailed specs for the strips you are considering.
 
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