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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Off With Your Head!

Commenting on one of Gizzard's first posts, I wrote of my practice of recording my mistakes as Learning Opportunities. In a later conversation with Martin, I got to thinking that this might be helpful material for other LumberJocks. So with this blog, I am commencing a series on LO's with the intention of about one per month in the series.

Anyone who has used brass screws in their woodworking will have experienced the dreadful "off with your head" scenario.



I was installing brass hinges for the lid of a small box. The box represented many hours of careful work, and I was anxious to get it finished. Perhaps I was rushing things a little as often happens on the home stretch. I had already cut out the hinge mortises by hand. All that remained was to screw the hinges in place.

I'm a bit of a detail freak, so to me it was important to have the diamond shape of each Phillips screw head lined up. That's eight screw heads considering the lid and body of the box. And then it happened. Without any apparent force, the head of one of the screws that go into the box portion simply detached from the shaft of the screw leaving the shaft buried in the wood.

Now I suspect that many brass screw heads have been epoxied in place. Who would be the wiser? Normally, this would work. A single screw and a little epoxy should hold. But in this case, I was concerned that the weight of the lid be evenly distributed between both hinges and that both hinges have equal structural integrity. My concern arose from the fact that these hinges had their own build in stop to prevent the lid going much beyond 90 degrees. You can imagine that this places more than the usual force on the hinge screws.



So I needed to remove the broken screw shaft that was below the surface of the surrounding wood. I had tried doing that before, and made a terrible mess of the wood. The resulting patch-up looked very amateurish and for all intense and purposes, ruined the piece. I certainly couldn't back-track without destroying the box. It was already glued up, so replacing the back wall of the box was out of the question.

And then I remembered.

Somewhere I had read of a solution to this. But because I wasn't certain that I had remembered correctly, or that it would even work, I had to set up a test piece. So I took a screw, drove it most of the way home, but before I did, I sniped of the head of the screw flush with the surface of the wood. Then I took my soldering iron and heated it up until the tip was cherry-red. I then held the tip of the iron against the tip of the broken screw shaft. I held it there until the wood started to smoke. There was no open flame, but the wood around the screw shaft was hot. Then I carefully took a pair of long needle-nosed pliers, and grabbing the end of the shaft while doing as little damage to the surrounding wood as possible, I turned the shaft free from the wood. The heated screw had caused the moisture content of the wood directly adjacent to the screw shaft to become very dry and pull away from the shaft. This facilitated the relatively easy removal of the shaft without much damage to the surrounding wood. And that's what I needed to prove to myself.

So now that I had tested and proven the theory, I turned to the box and did the same thing. Once the screw was out, I drilled a small whole enlarging the hole left by the removed screw shaft. This I filled gluing in place a hand carved piece of wood, smaller than a dowel. After the glue had thoroughly dried, I sanded the slightly protruding 'dowel' flush with the surrounding wood in the base of the mortise. I carefully drilled through the hinge using it as a drilling template. This time I was more careful. I first drove home a steel screw of the same size and thread. I first coated the steel screw with some candle wax to lubricate the thread as it is cut, and prepares the way for the brass screw. I also apply the candle wax to the brass screw.

Oh, I'm still a stickler for lining up my screw heads, but rather than tightening the screw by turning it ¼ more to align it, I get it as close as I can and forget it. (Have a look at the top photo - three of the four screw-heads are aligned, but the upper right one is not.) Also, I use a very small screw-driver which provides minimal mechanical leverage. Those jeweler's screw-drives work well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
 

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If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
that's a really good point. I've written things down in my little journal but because this is all new to me I am assuming that I will remember all of the learning curves that I have experienced up to now. But, it would be a really good practice, for me anyway, to review my do/don'ts prior to picking up a tool.

(and as for the male species thing, I think most women do first and read second as well - it's just that we let you guys take the first crack at it so we can shake our heads and say that you should have read the instructions!!)
 

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If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
Don - what an interesting (and timely) blog you write. I made a mistake on my last project because I was tired and pushing things a bit. Then I had to come up with a way to cover my mistake. As for not reading instructions, I think I am standing in line right behind you!
 

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If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
When I bought the Lumber, there were no instructions included.
 

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If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
Obi: Thats why we twice as much lumber as we need and then a little more for practice pieces.

Very good story Don.
 

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If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
Instuctions confuse me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If In Doubt, Follow the Instructions

A few days ago I returned to a project, a box that I have promised to make for a friend. I posted that project here.

This friend asked me to make it with a hinged lid with the hinges being constructed from wood, similar to this box.

I didn't expect the project would take long, particularly as I already had two pairs of hinges left from a batch I had previously made. The project proceeded well, and I am quite happy with the way it is turning out. I made the lid by cutting it free from the body of the box. And I added an Ash Burl veneer to the top and bottom surfaces of the lid panel. A also decided to use a piece of my favorite wood, Huon Pine in the base. I devised an unusual way of inserting the base panel by using bamboo wedges that allows the base to move.

All that was left was to install the hinges - easy - four hinge mortises and I'm ready for finishing.

However, when I reached for the hinges I had, I quickly realized they just would not do. First, the wood was the wrong species, hence the wrong color. But even worse, the hinges I had left over, were the poorest of the batch I'd previously made. I hadn't used them for a reason - they weren't up to my standard.

"No worries Mate!", as we Aussies say - make a new pair and make them out of the right choice of wood. So that's what I did, or more correctly, attempted to do.

"Mmm, ...let me see, how did I do this again? Oh, yes, I think I remember." So I began, selected the wood, plained it, cut it, milled it, and tried to fit it. Well as is obvious from the tone and title of this blog, it just didn't fit together. I had messed up somewhere in the procedure. I know this because I had the procedure written out in my notebook.

So, what did I learn? Well the title tells the story. Read the instruction book.

I think that this is a common failing of the male species. We don't ask for directions when lost and we don't read instructions. It's an ego thing - I mean how dumb do you think we are? I did it before, sure I had to read how, but I know now! So off I go, and then am surprised when I mess up. Well not really surprised - just angry for being so pig-headed.

So here is the LO - Until your method of work becomes second nature read the instructions. And even after it starts to be built into the procedural memory neurons of our brain cells, read the instructions. Procedural memory takes the longest time to build, but once fully established is locked in there for good. That's how you learned to ties a shoe-lace.
I agree, especialy if written in Chinglish.

However, in this blog I am referring to your own notes that you make to record the steps involved in your "method of work" when doing a complex procedure. This is a practice I borrowed from the Quality Assurance Certification process.

We used to laugh at this. The QA process requires businesses to document all procedures in order to be assured that the procedure was done according to a 'standard'. It didn't matter whether the standard was correct or not - the issue was that it was the standard. If you standardized the manufacture of concrete life vests you could obtain a QA Certificate.

Back to the subject. Seriously, it really is a good practice to make yourself notes, hopefully one that you will understand, to record some aspects of your work procedures. You would be amazed at how the process of writing these notes actually cements the procedure in you mind - obviously, that's not wat happened to me this time. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
and, so, why didn't you?
my thoughts start seeing a trend: we have Scott trying to salvage remnants of a broken screwdriver, not wanting to throw anything away; we have me not wanting to cut some silly pieces of sinew to redo the handle of a purse, not wanting to throw a good piece of string away; and now, we have a hinge that is known to break being used because of… not wanting to throw it away???? ...

I guess that urge to reuse the materials lies behind the appearance of most lumberjocks' shops-piles of scrap wood that might be used for something some day.

With that in mind it is tempting to set a new goal and toss out a lot of scrap but then we are shown Dusty's beautiful work, all made from scrap wood and what else is there to do but to "stash the trash" for that future project!!!
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
I tried the same thing with the DVD Ccabinet. Instead of gluing and doweling the shelves I tried to use nails. To me, using nails is just wrong. And, you guessed it. Something happened to cause the DVD Cabinet and all of the unglued parts fell out all over. Back to the shop it went abd glue and dowels were applied to all the shelves.

Everything was fine.

It was the same basic problem. Trying to hurry something up at the sake of Craftsmanship, for whatever reason. Simplicity, it's cheaper, easier, faster, more convenient.

It all boils down to one thing, My Friend. We, as craftsmen are to do all things as unto the Lord. And when we start trying to find shortcuts, you and I especially, the Master is not going to let us skate.

Have you thought about the square hinges you made on the other box?

Now for one last question…. WWJD.

Incra Hinge Crafter or hand-made square? One is quick and easy, one is harder but oh, so much more creative.

Have a Great Day!
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
I would like to hear more on this hinge crafting. Have you already posted information on how you do it?
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Mark, Rockler sells the Incra Hinge Crafter jig and the one I really like is this one
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
I could have save you a lot of time. I know this place that has a really good price on some cheap metal hinges. Of course you'd have to let go of a few buck. I really don't think trying to save a few pennys using wooden hinges…LOL
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Don: Do you have the new one or the old one (Incra hinge jig) that is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Karson, I wasn't aware of a new/old one. What's the difference? The one I use looks like this.

Quote Ob: "WWJD?"

I don't think that he would have used a Hinge Crafter. LOL
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Thats the new one. I've got an old one and it only created one side of pins and tails (if thats what you call them on hinges)

I have one (2) unopened packages for 4 years and have never used it. But I have the old one.
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Yeah, I think his tool box was a considerably lighter than ours!

It all boils down to deciding to do what is easy or what is right. Most of the time we're ok, there's just those times when we end up saying we knew better… sometimes we got there by wishful thinking and hoping (which sometimes works), and othertimes we just confirm what we really knew, but just didn't want to admit.

I too would have tried to find some use for those hinges.

I was thumbing through the woodworking books this week, and came across a 3 legged corner table. nicely crafted and designed. Was the project made intentionally… yes and no. The author had these 3 leftover legs (those, just in case extras) from previous projects (yes, they all matched) and came up with a use for those…. Basically boiled down to "make another one to match, or figure out a way to use what I've got. (other than firewood)
 

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Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Quote Don Quote Ob: "WWJD?"

I don't think that he would have used a Hinge Crafter. LOL

That was my point Don. Maybe your friend wants the square Hinges like jesus would have made. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Forget the Easy Option

I'm not sure why, but I've really struggled with a small box that I've been making. From the outset, the design of the box was to include wooden hinges. I guess I've made over a dozen boxes with these hinges, and have the procedure down pat.

This past Christmas I made this that featured these hinges. I use an Incra Hinge Crafter, and the method of work they describe makes four sets of two. So, I had a few left over from my Christmas project.

Now I have to say that I recall that the wood I used was rather weak. It was Fijian Mahogany which I've found rather prone to splitting. Although classified as a hardwood, compared to Australian hardwoods, it's rather soft.

So, I decided to take the easy way out and use the Fijian Mahogany hinges that I had.
I mentioned in a previous blog that I damaged one of these hinges when I accidentally knocked the box to the floor. What I didn't mention was that this was but the last one I had. The others had broken when sizing them to the box. Well, no worries; I have one more. So today I carefully fitted the last hinge to the box. All was going well. Well, that is, until I drilled the hinge for the 'ivory plugs' I intended to use.

You guessed it. The last one split.

What to do? Well, I first tried to glue the pieces back together. It looked pretty good - you couldn't even see that it had been split. I flexed the hinge to make sure that it was working alright. What I didn't realize was that I had inadvertently glued the two halves of the hinge together. As soon as I flexed the hinge, it completely snapped.

I was not a happy LumberJock!

I left my shop and went upstairs to my dear wife who is always willing to let me moan and groan (as long as it isn't about her). After explain the saga, she responded, "Why did you use those hinges if you already knew the wood was too weak?"

She got it in one.

Of course, the genesis of my problem I already knew. But to save a little time, I thought that I would take the easy way out. Therein lays the Learning Opportunity.

Never take the easy option - it will always turn around and bite you!

So, tomorrow, I will craft some new fresh hinges - it only takes about an hour. And I should have them installed without any difficulty.

Why didn't I do this in the first place?
Yes, Obi, I've been getting that message load and clear. The problem is, I've already cut the mortises in the lid and base. I can't think of a way to back-track.
 
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