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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Second Scrollwork Project

Well, the skills are progressing. I'm not sure how long it took me to complete the Treble Clef but today I ventured into more difficult work and decided to make a "dolphin napkin holder". It looked simple enough but was served a purpose. This is good.

Down I went into the shop and after an hour I had cut out one side of the napkin holder. "An hour", I thought, "I'll take forever to complete anything".

After lunch I returned to the saw to complete the second side. Half an hour later I stood smiling at "matching" (I say lightly) design. 1/2 the time. This is really good. And it didn't look half bad!

Now I'm going to spend the rest of the afternoon relaxing my shoulder muscles that are as tight as …(fill in the blank with your own description)... and I'm also going to take some time to analyze my work to see what I need to focus on when I start my next project.
But for now, a moment of celebration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
 

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The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
Debbie, hand tools are definitely the place to start. When you have a basic understanding of how to craft wood with them, you will better understand how power tools work.

I like the way you spoke of deciding "...to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4". I guess that's what id did with this project.
 

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The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
ah, returning life to wood, one that was lost when it was first deemed a 2×4… and later an offcut piece or waste. Not waste if you use it! Let us know what comes of it - form, function or lessons learned!
 

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The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
so is Umpteen just before umpty? Like 18, 19, Umpteen, umpty, umpty one, umpty-two etc … ? LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
yes indeed, said Umpty Dumpty
 

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In Loving Memory
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The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
Go girl, if you can do good work with chisels maybe you can start carving, look at Dick Cain, thats how he does a lot of his carving I'm sure, is with chisels. Make an umpty dumpty, I've never seen one. Ask Obi to show you one, I'll bet he's made one or two in his lifetime. jokemike
 

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The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
Go Girl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The Learning Curve, Part II

Having put the finishing touches on my latest project (that would be my second project ever) I decided to try and free a woodspirit from a piece of 2×4. The wood had edges of bark still on it, as well as lots of splinters-in-waiting.

How to clean this up, I ask myself. I could ask Rick, but he was buy installing a wood vice and I hated to interupt him for the umpteenth time, so I decided to take matters into my own hands. What could I lose? A piece of old 2×4? So, "take a chance", I told myself, "and just try something. It will either work or it won't. When you are done you will know a little more than when you started."

I picked up my Dremel, pretty much closed my eyes and selected a bit, hoping that it was indeed for sanding, and started attacking the rough spots of the wood. It was working, I guess. At least I was "creating".

A few moments later, Rick was by my side, silently watching. "Is this working", I asked. His response was, "what are you trying to do?" Ah, well that is a good response for a guide - don't assume you know what the goal is!! I replied, "sand off these chunks of wood. Will this work?" Supportive as ever, he said, "seems to be working." Knowing that there was more to that answer than meets the eye/ear, I followed the response with, "what would YOU do?" And so the entry into the chisel world began.

With my piece of wood clamped in the new wood vice, I began to scrape away at the unwanted fibres of wood. And now I know why so many woodworkers leave their power tools behind and make the commitment to hand tools!

What a beautiful feeling.
thanks guys :)
I feel like a toddler-everything is new, exciting, and challenging
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Beginnings

For the past few years, several of my photos have been hanging in a local restaurant. It has been a pleasure to sit down at a table and look up at one of my favourite creations.

The restaurant is now changing hands and so the photos have been returned to me. It was a little exciting as I opened the box to view all of the photos, some of which I had forgotten about. Obviously they had been some of my favourite images at the time and I am once again captured by the beauty of the subjects. Several "ooh, aaah's" later, I took a closer look at my work, analyzing the elements of composition and lighting.

It is interesting to look back at one's work and see how far you have come, how more advanced your skills are than when the journey began. I look forward to the day that I can look back at my beginning woodwork projects and say "ooh, ahh… look at all I have learned since then."

My little napkin holder shall forever be a treasure, not because of its quality or even functionality but because it was my first and because it is where the journey began. Years from now I will be able to look back and see where it all started and take pride in all that I have learned-I hope
 

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Beginnings

For the past few years, several of my photos have been hanging in a local restaurant. It has been a pleasure to sit down at a table and look up at one of my favourite creations.

The restaurant is now changing hands and so the photos have been returned to me. It was a little exciting as I opened the box to view all of the photos, some of which I had forgotten about. Obviously they had been some of my favourite images at the time and I am once again captured by the beauty of the subjects. Several "ooh, aaah's" later, I took a closer look at my work, analyzing the elements of composition and lighting.

It is interesting to look back at one's work and see how far you have come, how more advanced your skills are than when the journey began. I look forward to the day that I can look back at my beginning woodwork projects and say "ooh, ahh… look at all I have learned since then."

My little napkin holder shall forever be a treasure, not because of its quality or even functionality but because it was my first and because it is where the journey began. Years from now I will be able to look back and see where it all started and take pride in all that I have learned-I hope
Followed your web site and saw some of your photos. Wow! Beautiful work! If you get to that level woodworking your work will be awsome!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Beginnings

For the past few years, several of my photos have been hanging in a local restaurant. It has been a pleasure to sit down at a table and look up at one of my favourite creations.

The restaurant is now changing hands and so the photos have been returned to me. It was a little exciting as I opened the box to view all of the photos, some of which I had forgotten about. Obviously they had been some of my favourite images at the time and I am once again captured by the beauty of the subjects. Several "ooh, aaah's" later, I took a closer look at my work, analyzing the elements of composition and lighting.

It is interesting to look back at one's work and see how far you have come, how more advanced your skills are than when the journey began. I look forward to the day that I can look back at my beginning woodwork projects and say "ooh, ahh… look at all I have learned since then."

My little napkin holder shall forever be a treasure, not because of its quality or even functionality but because it was my first and because it is where the journey began. Years from now I will be able to look back and see where it all started and take pride in all that I have learned-I hope
thanks Dennis :)
My photography skills have a long way to go and i've doing that for a while. And for me, the camera was easy - this woodworking stuff.. well, we'll see.

thanks again for your kind words
 

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Beginnings

For the past few years, several of my photos have been hanging in a local restaurant. It has been a pleasure to sit down at a table and look up at one of my favourite creations.

The restaurant is now changing hands and so the photos have been returned to me. It was a little exciting as I opened the box to view all of the photos, some of which I had forgotten about. Obviously they had been some of my favourite images at the time and I am once again captured by the beauty of the subjects. Several "ooh, aaah's" later, I took a closer look at my work, analyzing the elements of composition and lighting.

It is interesting to look back at one's work and see how far you have come, how more advanced your skills are than when the journey began. I look forward to the day that I can look back at my beginning woodwork projects and say "ooh, ahh… look at all I have learned since then."

My little napkin holder shall forever be a treasure, not because of its quality or even functionality but because it was my first and because it is where the journey began. Years from now I will be able to look back and see where it all started and take pride in all that I have learned-I hope
Debbie, I share your experience in a slightly different way. One of my inspirations in woodworking continues to be my Dad. Like him, I took up woodworking after I retired. I have a number of his pieces which I cherish. When I first received these as gifts, I was most impressed with his skills. When I started my wood crafting journey, one of my goals was "to be as good as Dad". But as I've learned in other aspects of life, one has to keep adjusting one's goals. If I may say so, and I don't want this to come across as immodest, I now need to shoot for a higher standard.

Now, I still love the pieces he gave me, both for their quality and sentimental value. But it's primarily the sentimental value that matters to me. And it will probably be that way with the pieces I pass on to my family members. The skill level may be appreciated, but it's the memories they evoke that give them their real value.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Beginnings

For the past few years, several of my photos have been hanging in a local restaurant. It has been a pleasure to sit down at a table and look up at one of my favourite creations.

The restaurant is now changing hands and so the photos have been returned to me. It was a little exciting as I opened the box to view all of the photos, some of which I had forgotten about. Obviously they had been some of my favourite images at the time and I am once again captured by the beauty of the subjects. Several "ooh, aaah's" later, I took a closer look at my work, analyzing the elements of composition and lighting.

It is interesting to look back at one's work and see how far you have come, how more advanced your skills are than when the journey began. I look forward to the day that I can look back at my beginning woodwork projects and say "ooh, ahh… look at all I have learned since then."

My little napkin holder shall forever be a treasure, not because of its quality or even functionality but because it was my first and because it is where the journey began. Years from now I will be able to look back and see where it all started and take pride in all that I have learned-I hope
You are so right. Just as I was saying in messages about the beautiful rocking horse, one of my treasured memories of my Dad is when he made me the hula skirt out of binder twine: it wasn't about quality or even functionality, it was that my Dad took the time and effort to make it for me. I wish I still had that skirt.
 

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Personal Growth

Today I made a couple more "Life Guide" tools to use with my clients and as I look back at my day I realized that I was quite efficient and if anyone had been watching they might have thought that I knew what I was doing!

With an idea of what I wanted, I "selected" the wood that I wanted, I cut it to size on the mitre saw, I started up the ol' (well, "new") spindle sander and smoothed down the edges and sides, I used the scroll saw to cut out designs, I flipped on the little Dremel Router and put a curved edge on the pieces, I hand-sanded, and I wood-burned the appropriate words into the wood (and I even spelled them correctly, unlike on the leather in my wooden Journal - thanks, Jenn, for pointing that out!).

It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!
 

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Personal Growth

Today I made a couple more "Life Guide" tools to use with my clients and as I look back at my day I realized that I was quite efficient and if anyone had been watching they might have thought that I knew what I was doing!

With an idea of what I wanted, I "selected" the wood that I wanted, I cut it to size on the mitre saw, I started up the ol' (well, "new") spindle sander and smoothed down the edges and sides, I used the scroll saw to cut out designs, I flipped on the little Dremel Router and put a curved edge on the pieces, I hand-sanded, and I wood-burned the appropriate words into the wood (and I even spelled them correctly, unlike on the leather in my wooden Journal - thanks, Jenn, for pointing that out!).

It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!
Lookout Debbie: You will soon be on to tables and chairs. I hope you have room for them :>)
 

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Personal Growth

Today I made a couple more "Life Guide" tools to use with my clients and as I look back at my day I realized that I was quite efficient and if anyone had been watching they might have thought that I knew what I was doing!

With an idea of what I wanted, I "selected" the wood that I wanted, I cut it to size on the mitre saw, I started up the ol' (well, "new") spindle sander and smoothed down the edges and sides, I used the scroll saw to cut out designs, I flipped on the little Dremel Router and put a curved edge on the pieces, I hand-sanded, and I wood-burned the appropriate words into the wood (and I even spelled them correctly, unlike on the leather in my wooden Journal - thanks, Jenn, for pointing that out!).

It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!
Hi Debbie;
--to know your-self as oneself is to know that you can only do 'very good projects'!!!

What some call a mistake or a bad project is to my way of thinking only an unfinished project, since any worker of wood knows how to fix and move on to the next step of the project which is success….achiever….winner !

I may have shared this before but this is still worth a repeat:

"I tell you, if one wants to be active, one must not be afraid of going wrong, one must not be afraid of making mistakes now and then. Many people think that they will become good just by doing no harm - but that's a lie, and you yourself used to call it that. That way lies stagnation, mediocrity." -by Vincent van Gogh

"It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!"

Believe in your-self and no-one will ever be able to throw you off track….
Tomorrows project will all-ways be your best project!
Personal groweth only grows well, when watered daily with personal positive words which in turn become the power thoughts of now!
GODSPEED,
Frank
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Personal Growth

Today I made a couple more "Life Guide" tools to use with my clients and as I look back at my day I realized that I was quite efficient and if anyone had been watching they might have thought that I knew what I was doing!

With an idea of what I wanted, I "selected" the wood that I wanted, I cut it to size on the mitre saw, I started up the ol' (well, "new") spindle sander and smoothed down the edges and sides, I used the scroll saw to cut out designs, I flipped on the little Dremel Router and put a curved edge on the pieces, I hand-sanded, and I wood-burned the appropriate words into the wood (and I even spelled them correctly, unlike on the leather in my wooden Journal - thanks, Jenn, for pointing that out!).

It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!
Frank, do you have people beating a path to your doorstep to listen to your wisdom??? !!!

Your words remind me of a phrase I heard many years ago and I have tried to live by: "if something is worth doing, it is worth doing wrong". (or, it's better to have tried and lost than not to have tried at all)..
When I work with parents and educators I talk about the diffence in learning between a child who does something and does it right and the child who does something and makes a mistake . The child making a "mistake" has actually learned more than the one who had things turn out correctly (that is of course depending on whether the first child knows how to learn from the situation.)

I'm looking forward to tomorrow's projects (or next week's, which ever comes first)

Karson, I have lots of room-an acre of land waiting to be filled up :)
 

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Personal Growth

Today I made a couple more "Life Guide" tools to use with my clients and as I look back at my day I realized that I was quite efficient and if anyone had been watching they might have thought that I knew what I was doing!

With an idea of what I wanted, I "selected" the wood that I wanted, I cut it to size on the mitre saw, I started up the ol' (well, "new") spindle sander and smoothed down the edges and sides, I used the scroll saw to cut out designs, I flipped on the little Dremel Router and put a curved edge on the pieces, I hand-sanded, and I wood-burned the appropriate words into the wood (and I even spelled them correctly, unlike on the leather in my wooden Journal - thanks, Jenn, for pointing that out!).

It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!
Ah… an acres worth of land to pull down the trees, and put up a forest of chairs, tables, bookcases and more. What a landcape!
 

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Personal Growth

Today I made a couple more "Life Guide" tools to use with my clients and as I look back at my day I realized that I was quite efficient and if anyone had been watching they might have thought that I knew what I was doing!

With an idea of what I wanted, I "selected" the wood that I wanted, I cut it to size on the mitre saw, I started up the ol' (well, "new") spindle sander and smoothed down the edges and sides, I used the scroll saw to cut out designs, I flipped on the little Dremel Router and put a curved edge on the pieces, I hand-sanded, and I wood-burned the appropriate words into the wood (and I even spelled them correctly, unlike on the leather in my wooden Journal - thanks, Jenn, for pointing that out!).

It was just a couple weeks ago that I was getting my mini-lessons on how to set up the tools for my use and now I was flying around the shop like a pro. I have to admit that it felt pretty good and the projects didn't turn out too badly either!!
Debbie, if your woodworking experience runs true to form, you will learn by doing even if you sometimes think, "Will I ever make any progress with this?"

It never ceases to impress me how much one learns by simply getting stuck into the work. Little by little you face new frontiers and steep hills, but as Frank has said, it's these experiences that build new skills into our hands and brains.

I'll pick up a tool and proceed to do something. Then suddenly, I realize that this 'something' is a skill that previously had been a hurdle. Where did I learn how to do this? Oh, yes, I did this when making my last project and here I am with a level of skill that came out of that once daunting experience.

Keep at it - you will surprise yourself and your friends.
 
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