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hello guys ,

I have a craftsman lathe that I have had new for quite a few years and never found the time to set it up, It does not have a stand on it, but I have all the tools and things for it, my two sons are asking about setting it up and how it works and such, so that is my inspiration to finally get it going,,It is a new year you know,, lets make it a good one haha,,

so I have a spot in my shop that I can set it up safely and with enough room that it wont get in the way of anything,

I am going to build a sturdy stand for it but wasnt sure of optimum sixe for it, the lathe is a pretty big one, I think it is like 3 feet [+] long,, I am over 6 foot and the boys are tall as well, the older one is 6' and the younger is 5.3',,

any suggestions would be appreciated, thansk pat
 

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Elbow height is where to start. Make adjustments from that to be comfortable. You want to be standing upright,and your arms close to 90 degrees at the elbow.

You could make it high for you, and build a level platform that you could put in place the kids.
 

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Hairy is correct.
It would be uncomfortable to work on a lathe bending down or having your arms to low. In addition you are most stable working with your arms bent around 90 degrees so you can hold them against you torso when the work calls for "extra" stability. I often move my whole body (not my feet) as the tool goes back and forth across the tool rest. I consider it almost dangerous to work with your arms too high.
The smaller som may need a raised platform to stand on if you build the base to fit you and the taller son.
 

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Hi They are all correct about the hight to start from but there is one thing all the book writers and pros forget
and that is not all peoples arms are the same. if when u buy a jacket and u buy one marked long and if fits perfect the arm lenght then increase hight of the lathe center if jacket is regular lathe center at elbow hight.
hope it makes sense
Regards Roger in SA
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks guys, I actually was just saying that we will probably have to make a platform for the younger son to stand on and raise him to the lathe, , I appreciate the help with height, I will more than likely have more questions on lathe work, as the last time I used one was in high school.. that was quite a while ago,,

so I told my younger son jesse, 13,, that we will get a book from the library, he will read it and have to teach dear ole dad how to use it, he got a kick out of it.. he was /is very interested in getting this going we were in the shop yesterday moving stuff around and cleaning up to get it set up, I will keep you informed, thanks pat
 

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Rule of thumb for lathe height is that if you hold your arms at your sides and bend your arm from the elbow 90 degrees your hand should be level with the center of the spindle. Easy way to determine this is to put your tool rest up to the spindle at center height. Your bent arm should be able to rest on the tool rest and be parallel to the bed ways. Would not make a difference how tall, or short you are or length of your arms - if you use the above method your lathe will be at a comfortable height. For young people build a solid riser platform - I recently visited someones shop and they had their son standing on a drywall bucket - not safe!
 
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