LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,303 Posts
I hope that this is in the right place. I bought a lathe awhile back, and many tools since then to use on it, but never made a project on it. One of my friends made a few conical pieces to carve into xmas trees. That is the extent of the use. I'm doing wood carving and some metal working, and need room in my "shop" for that. Take the whole magilla for $1100, OBO. Located in Simi Valley, CA. NO shipping. The last pic is of the hardware needed to turn something up to 30" in diameter.

Table Wood Machine tool Cabinetry Workbench
!

Kitchen utensil Gas Automotive lighting Wood Metal


Azure Musical instrument Rectangle Gas Chair


Here are the details-
Item Part Number Condition
Record Lathe CLC3 Barely used
Record Power Chisels CHS 6 Barely used
Oneway Jumbo Jaws Chuck 2047 New in Box
Oneway 4-Jaw Scroll Chuck 2170 New in Box
Rockler MT1 Tail Stock Center 512 New in Box
Crown 5-piece Miniature turning chisels 27745 New in Box
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Among carbide turning tools, I really like the Hunter Tool Systems' Osprey carbide tools. Unlike most carbide turning tools, Hunter's tools use round, cupped cutters that can be used similarly to gouges, whether roughing (scraping) or rolling it over to "ride the bevel" (much like a gouge) for a really smooth surface requiring much less sanding. They are not cheap, but the #2 Osprey ($92, including handle) with a round shank is very versatile for both bowl and spindle turning. There are a few others selling cupped carbide tools (e.g. Harrison Specialties) but Hunter is the only one I know offering tools that present the cutter at an angle on the shank, making it much easier to control. Hunter Hercules tools are similar, but have square shanks, and offer a larger diameter #3 cutter.

Also, a high speed steel skew chisel can be easily sharpened by hand on standard stones, since it has a straight cutting edge. It seems like the skew chisel has fallen out of favor recently, but is still an excellent and versatile tool in the arsenal of one who learns how to use it. It is also best used when "riding the bevel" to control the aggressiveness of the cut. Just keep the pointy corner away from the wood!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited by Moderator)
Believe it or not, no! I'll even throw in some turning blanks that I bought; some of it is even "AAA" figured maple. I've been meaning to turn those blanks, but I have so many irons in the fire, none are getting hot. Ima put it back on Craigs List, I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,303 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Believe it or not, no! I'll even throw in some turning blanks that I bought; some of it is even "AAA" figured maple. I've been meaning to turn those blanks, but I have so many irons in the fire, none are getting hot. Ima put it back on Craigs List, I guess.
Bump. Curious what was edited by a moderator?
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top