LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 102 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,007 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Hey, Lew, thanks! Looking forward to the series. Great stuff!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Great job on the rolling pin. And thanks for the blog on the jig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
502 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Lew,

Thanks for the post. I am excited about learning how to do that. I just started turning and I want to learn to lay-up blanks like that. I think they are beautiful. I find it truly amazing what we can make wood do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Lew, I'm looking forward to this series. The rolling pin looked great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,122 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Lew…Thanks for the link….I look forward to the series also !!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Hi Lew, I love this design. Do you have more detailed drawings of the Diagonal Cutting Jig?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Hope nobody minds, I have entered this blog series into the Kitchen Treasures Contest.

Lew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,082 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Hey Lew. I don´t mind at all. For sure it´s going to be difficult to compete in the rolling pin area with you.

So, what do you think about a toothpick blog !!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Sound like a winner!! Toothpicks of every imaginable wood!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
This is wonderful. I will definitely be building a jig something like that if I ever want to do another run of rolling pins. THANKS for posting it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
im just learning about this rolling pens and it sounds great. thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The Jigs

I have had so many positive comments and feedback on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. Thank you for all of them. Many LumberJocks asked for instructions on how they are made- so here goes. I am a fan of "Cook Book" style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out.

I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it!

The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles project.

Special Diagonal Cutting Jig



Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank



Originally jig slid over the rip fence. Later modified to ride in miter slot for accurate repetitive cuts.

Two spacer strips on the sled needed for cleaning out the diagonal cut (more later)

Disassembled Fences



Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation

Partially Assembled Fences



Normal Taper Jig

During the blank assembly, it is necessary to trim waste material before proceeding to the next step. This simple tapering jig holds the blank for those cuts.



More details for this jig can be seen at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7848

That's a start. More in a day or so.

Lew
Rockingk,
Any questions, just ask!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Laying Out the Blank

This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22" long and 2" square.
Locate the center of the length (11") and carry a line around the blank.
The ellipses are 11" long and made of three pieces of 1/8" thick material
Layout a mark 5 ½" on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank.



To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8" thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge. It is not necessary to layout both diagonals on each side. However, a check of the second diagonal will indicate if the layout is accurate and crossing in the center of the blank.

NOTE: the cut for the diagonal strips falls within the 11" layout lines





Checking the diagonals for centered layout



Rotate the blank 90 degrees and layout the location on the next diagonal cut.
Continue rotating and drawing the diagonals until all four sides have been completed.

Each diagonal consisted of two drawn lines. One line intersected with the layout line that defined the end of the ellipse. The second diagonal line ends "short" of the ellipse layout line. The location of the end, of this diagonal line, must be carried around the blank. These lines define the location of the saw cuts for the strips that create the ellipse.



Accuracy is important when laying out these lines in order to get the ellipses to maintain continuity.

This drawing is not to scale. The measurements are what I used to make this rolling pin. The length and diameters were averaged from various baking supply web sites for their rolling pins.



I will try to post more in a day or so.

Lew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,142 Posts
Laying Out the Blank

This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22" long and 2" square.
Locate the center of the length (11") and carry a line around the blank.
The ellipses are 11" long and made of three pieces of 1/8" thick material
Layout a mark 5 ½" on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank.



To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8" thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge. It is not necessary to layout both diagonals on each side. However, a check of the second diagonal will indicate if the layout is accurate and crossing in the center of the blank.

NOTE: the cut for the diagonal strips falls within the 11" layout lines





Checking the diagonals for centered layout



Rotate the blank 90 degrees and layout the location on the next diagonal cut.
Continue rotating and drawing the diagonals until all four sides have been completed.

Each diagonal consisted of two drawn lines. One line intersected with the layout line that defined the end of the ellipse. The second diagonal line ends "short" of the ellipse layout line. The location of the end, of this diagonal line, must be carried around the blank. These lines define the location of the saw cuts for the strips that create the ellipse.



Accuracy is important when laying out these lines in order to get the ellipses to maintain continuity.

This drawing is not to scale. The measurements are what I used to make this rolling pin. The length and diameters were averaged from various baking supply web sites for their rolling pins.



I will try to post more in a day or so.

Lew
Thanks for the tutorial Lew. I may have to try one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Laying Out the Blank

This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22" long and 2" square.
Locate the center of the length (11") and carry a line around the blank.
The ellipses are 11" long and made of three pieces of 1/8" thick material
Layout a mark 5 ½" on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank.



To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8" thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge. It is not necessary to layout both diagonals on each side. However, a check of the second diagonal will indicate if the layout is accurate and crossing in the center of the blank.

NOTE: the cut for the diagonal strips falls within the 11" layout lines





Checking the diagonals for centered layout



Rotate the blank 90 degrees and layout the location on the next diagonal cut.
Continue rotating and drawing the diagonals until all four sides have been completed.

Each diagonal consisted of two drawn lines. One line intersected with the layout line that defined the end of the ellipse. The second diagonal line ends "short" of the ellipse layout line. The location of the end, of this diagonal line, must be carried around the blank. These lines define the location of the saw cuts for the strips that create the ellipse.



Accuracy is important when laying out these lines in order to get the ellipses to maintain continuity.

This drawing is not to scale. The measurements are what I used to make this rolling pin. The length and diameters were averaged from various baking supply web sites for their rolling pins.



I will try to post more in a day or so.

Lew
Great shots Lew. Thanks for the tutorial
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,649 Posts
Laying Out the Blank

This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22" long and 2" square.
Locate the center of the length (11") and carry a line around the blank.
The ellipses are 11" long and made of three pieces of 1/8" thick material
Layout a mark 5 ½" on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank.



To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8" thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge. It is not necessary to layout both diagonals on each side. However, a check of the second diagonal will indicate if the layout is accurate and crossing in the center of the blank.

NOTE: the cut for the diagonal strips falls within the 11" layout lines





Checking the diagonals for centered layout



Rotate the blank 90 degrees and layout the location on the next diagonal cut.
Continue rotating and drawing the diagonals until all four sides have been completed.

Each diagonal consisted of two drawn lines. One line intersected with the layout line that defined the end of the ellipse. The second diagonal line ends "short" of the ellipse layout line. The location of the end, of this diagonal line, must be carried around the blank. These lines define the location of the saw cuts for the strips that create the ellipse.



Accuracy is important when laying out these lines in order to get the ellipses to maintain continuity.

This drawing is not to scale. The measurements are what I used to make this rolling pin. The length and diameters were averaged from various baking supply web sites for their rolling pins.



I will try to post more in a day or so.

Lew
Looks complicated--looking forward to more of the tutorial. These types of projects always amaze this lady that does squares and rectangulars mostly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,555 Posts
Laying Out the Blank

This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22" long and 2" square.
Locate the center of the length (11") and carry a line around the blank.
The ellipses are 11" long and made of three pieces of 1/8" thick material
Layout a mark 5 ½" on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank.



To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8" thick spacer gauge, drawing lines on the blank, along BOTH sides of the spacer gauge. It is not necessary to layout both diagonals on each side. However, a check of the second diagonal will indicate if the layout is accurate and crossing in the center of the blank.

NOTE: the cut for the diagonal strips falls within the 11" layout lines





Checking the diagonals for centered layout



Rotate the blank 90 degrees and layout the location on the next diagonal cut.
Continue rotating and drawing the diagonals until all four sides have been completed.

Each diagonal consisted of two drawn lines. One line intersected with the layout line that defined the end of the ellipse. The second diagonal line ends "short" of the ellipse layout line. The location of the end, of this diagonal line, must be carried around the blank. These lines define the location of the saw cuts for the strips that create the ellipse.



Accuracy is important when laying out these lines in order to get the ellipses to maintain continuity.

This drawing is not to scale. The measurements are what I used to make this rolling pin. The length and diameters were averaged from various baking supply web sites for their rolling pins.



I will try to post more in a day or so.

Lew
very cool….
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,709 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Making the Saw Cuts For the Strips

Once the blank has the layout lines drawn, it is time to cut the slots for the ellipses.

The first step is to set the blade height. When the cut is made, there should be about 1/8" of material left holding the two sides together.



This really aids in the glue up by keeping the pieces aligned.

Set the blank on the jig and adjust the angle and the end stop so that the front SHORTER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut. Orientation is when you are standing at the back of the saw looking forward. (These pictures are from the SIDES of the saw).



Continue to adjust the angle and the end stop so that the rear LONGER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut.



Securely tighten all adjustments. Once these angles/lengths are set, they will not change for all of the remaining cuts.

Clamp the blank firmly in the jig. Double check the layout lines.

In order to keep the correct orientation of the blank, I labeled the end of the blank nearest me.

With everything secure, make the first cut.

Unclamp the blank.

To make the second cut, I made a space strip to reposition the blank without having to change any of the jig setting. My first guess was that this spacer would be 3/8" thick- the same as the width of the finished cut. BUT that was too thick. I guess there is a way to calculate the thickness but trial and error won out. It came out closer to 1/4" (.265").

The second cut is made with the blank position so that the front LONGER layout line is on the RIGHT side of the saw cut.



The rear SHORTER layout line is on the RIGHT side of the saw cut.



The walnut spacer strip can be seen between the blank and the fence of the jig. The thickness of the spacer strip could be different for each person. So check the setup carefully. Also, Make sure the blank butts up against the end stop before each cut.

After the second cut has been made, there may be a thin piece of material left in the slot. I made another spacer- about 1/8"- replaced the first spacer and made a third "clean out" pass.

The finished cut should be 3/8" wide and almost through the blank.







Part #4 will cover the first glue up and trim- maybe later today or tomorrow.

Thanks for reading!

Lew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,555 Posts
Making the Saw Cuts For the Strips

Once the blank has the layout lines drawn, it is time to cut the slots for the ellipses.

The first step is to set the blade height. When the cut is made, there should be about 1/8" of material left holding the two sides together.



This really aids in the glue up by keeping the pieces aligned.

Set the blank on the jig and adjust the angle and the end stop so that the front SHORTER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut. Orientation is when you are standing at the back of the saw looking forward. (These pictures are from the SIDES of the saw).



Continue to adjust the angle and the end stop so that the rear LONGER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut.



Securely tighten all adjustments. Once these angles/lengths are set, they will not change for all of the remaining cuts.

Clamp the blank firmly in the jig. Double check the layout lines.

In order to keep the correct orientation of the blank, I labeled the end of the blank nearest me.

With everything secure, make the first cut.

Unclamp the blank.

To make the second cut, I made a space strip to reposition the blank without having to change any of the jig setting. My first guess was that this spacer would be 3/8" thick- the same as the width of the finished cut. BUT that was too thick. I guess there is a way to calculate the thickness but trial and error won out. It came out closer to 1/4" (.265").

The second cut is made with the blank position so that the front LONGER layout line is on the RIGHT side of the saw cut.



The rear SHORTER layout line is on the RIGHT side of the saw cut.



The walnut spacer strip can be seen between the blank and the fence of the jig. The thickness of the spacer strip could be different for each person. So check the setup carefully. Also, Make sure the blank butts up against the end stop before each cut.

After the second cut has been made, there may be a thin piece of material left in the slot. I made another spacer- about 1/8"- replaced the first spacer and made a third "clean out" pass.

The finished cut should be 3/8" wide and almost through the blank.







Part #4 will cover the first glue up and trim- maybe later today or tomorrow.

Thanks for reading!

Lew
cant wait to see the next step when you get a chance…looking good
 
1 - 20 of 102 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top