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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bringing you up to speed

This blog starts half way through my journey. The story goes like this…

I took the plunge and offered to take on renovating my in-laws' 42 year old kitchen last spring. I say 'starting' last summer because I am now, as of Feb 2011, in the middle of what appears to be a 12-16 month project. The good news is that my wife's folks are very flexible in allowing me to work at my own pace fitting nicely with the fact we have a busy life with kids, jobs, etc…

Design (April '10)

Designing the kitchen took about a month. This basically consisted of countless evenings of henscratching and working through different diagrams to take back to Diane (Mother in Law).

I suggested raised panels for everything (drawers, doors, cabinet ends…) Once she was in agreement with the approach, it was time to focus on acquiring the materials and tools needed to take on this behemoth of a project. Quite simply, my modest tool collection needed some attention at the time. After obtaining a solid old Rockwell 6" jointer, the following router bits were procurred for making the doors/drawers and crown moldings: A Reversable rail and stile bit (MLCS), an ogee raised panel bit (Lee Valley) and a crown molding bit (MLCS) were just what the doctor ordered!

It was decided that the Melamine would be used for the boxes and the edges would receive a 5/16" band of solid cherry in all exposed areas - I don't like iron-on edging! Where I got this Cherry is a story for another day.

Construction Commences (June '10)

I was able to begin focusing on the tall task of building the boxes for the base and upper cabinets in my 16×16' shed (only 8×8' is usable for woodworking). It took me all summer of to build 12 of the 18 overall carcasses needed for the whole kitchen job. I delivered the carcasses to George & Diane's house in my station wagon one or two at a time. When not building the boxes, I spent time developing the following finishing formula for our Cherry:

2 coats of Danish Oil, 2 coats of wipe on poly, 3 coats of waterborne poly

Demo (August '10)

The demolition phase (down to the plaster and subfloor) and electrical re-work took the better part of a month during August. Before we could install the base cabinets, the new cork floor had to be installed by my father-in-law and yours truly.

By October, all of the constructed upper, base and pantry cabinets and were installed (sans doors) along with four drawers (no raised panel fronts). Once the new acrylic countertop w/ undermount sink was installed, the kitchen was marginally functional again. Pics of installed boxes are forthcoming…

Hitting a wall (December '10)

My shed is not heated/insulated meaning milling and construction all but stopped when the snow started to fly and it got cold here in Eastern Canada (New Brunswick).

On an unseasonably mild day in December, I decided to mill up some parts to make some drawers for the tall pantry unit. I was able to relocate some of my tools and materials inside to my basement so I could construct the low profile drawers in the warmth of my home. The sides and backs are ash and the cherry fronts are attached w/ pinned rabbets. Here are some pics of the drawers and the cork floor:

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Finger Ruler Hardwood


Wood Shelving Shipping box Packing materials Floor


At the time of writing (Feb 1st, 2011) I still have to build the remaining six upper cabinet boxes along with the new island.

More progress reports and pictures to come - Jon
 

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Bringing you up to speed

This blog starts half way through my journey. The story goes like this…

I took the plunge and offered to take on renovating my in-laws' 42 year old kitchen last spring. I say 'starting' last summer because I am now, as of Feb 2011, in the middle of what appears to be a 12-16 month project. The good news is that my wife's folks are very flexible in allowing me to work at my own pace fitting nicely with the fact we have a busy life with kids, jobs, etc…

Design (April '10)

Designing the kitchen took about a month. This basically consisted of countless evenings of henscratching and working through different diagrams to take back to Diane (Mother in Law).

I suggested raised panels for everything (drawers, doors, cabinet ends…) Once she was in agreement with the approach, it was time to focus on acquiring the materials and tools needed to take on this behemoth of a project. Quite simply, my modest tool collection needed some attention at the time. After obtaining a solid old Rockwell 6" jointer, the following router bits were procurred for making the doors/drawers and crown moldings: A Reversable rail and stile bit (MLCS), an ogee raised panel bit (Lee Valley) and a crown molding bit (MLCS) were just what the doctor ordered!

It was decided that the Melamine would be used for the boxes and the edges would receive a 5/16" band of solid cherry in all exposed areas - I don't like iron-on edging! Where I got this Cherry is a story for another day.

Construction Commences (June '10)

I was able to begin focusing on the tall task of building the boxes for the base and upper cabinets in my 16×16' shed (only 8×8' is usable for woodworking). It took me all summer of to build 12 of the 18 overall carcasses needed for the whole kitchen job. I delivered the carcasses to George & Diane's house in my station wagon one or two at a time. When not building the boxes, I spent time developing the following finishing formula for our Cherry:

2 coats of Danish Oil, 2 coats of wipe on poly, 3 coats of waterborne poly

Demo (August '10)

The demolition phase (down to the plaster and subfloor) and electrical re-work took the better part of a month during August. Before we could install the base cabinets, the new cork floor had to be installed by my father-in-law and yours truly.

By October, all of the constructed upper, base and pantry cabinets and were installed (sans doors) along with four drawers (no raised panel fronts). Once the new acrylic countertop w/ undermount sink was installed, the kitchen was marginally functional again. Pics of installed boxes are forthcoming…

Hitting a wall (December '10)

My shed is not heated/insulated meaning milling and construction all but stopped when the snow started to fly and it got cold here in Eastern Canada (New Brunswick).

On an unseasonably mild day in December, I decided to mill up some parts to make some drawers for the tall pantry unit. I was able to relocate some of my tools and materials inside to my basement so I could construct the low profile drawers in the warmth of my home. The sides and backs are ash and the cherry fronts are attached w/ pinned rabbets. Here are some pics of the drawers and the cork floor:

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


Wood Rectangle Finger Ruler Hardwood


Wood Shelving Shipping box Packing materials Floor


At the time of writing (Feb 1st, 2011) I still have to build the remaining six upper cabinet boxes along with the new island.

More progress reports and pictures to come - Jon
I love the rabbeted and pinned drawer fronts. It so refreshing to see something other than dovetailed drawers.

Nice work!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
About the Cherry...

A gift from Uncle Earle

In late 2009, while packing up Aunt Verona's (Diane's sister) farmhouse in rural New Brunswick, I stumbled across 150 bd feet (mostly 4/4 and some 6/4 boards) of stickered Black Cherry in the damp cellar. It turns out that uncle Earle (Verona's late husband) had been storing this wood for a purpose unknown to anyone. Cherry doesn't grow in abundance in this part of the world so I am not sure where he got this wood. He was however in the lumber trade business and operated a portable sawmill years ago according to various family members.

Once I inspected the wood, there was about 120 bd feet of usable cherry by my calculations. The remaining 30 feet was molded badly, presumably due to years of storage in the damp cellar.

After settling on a purchase price with the family, the wood was re-located to my house and stored in my basement for the next 6 months next to a dehumidifier. This coincided with the kitchen reno discussions Diane and I were in the midst of. I figured there would be enough cherry to at least get a good start on the raised panel doors and drawer fronts.

I was able to get the 4/4 wood down to approximately 8% MC by spring 2010. From what I read, this is a stable enough MC level to start milling parts for doors, cabinet end-panels and drawer fronts like these ones:

Sleeve Comfort Wood Curtain Beige


Door Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


Comments were made that Uncle Earle would've been happy to know that someone in the family was putting this wood to good use creating a nice sentimental feeling as I worked with this wood.

Another 120 bd feet of kiln dried cherry would be purchased from a local lumberyard in the summer of 2010 - hopefully enough to finish the whole kitchen. I'll be sure not to mix the air dried cherry with the kiln dried cherry!
 

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About the Cherry...

A gift from Uncle Earle

In late 2009, while packing up Aunt Verona's (Diane's sister) farmhouse in rural New Brunswick, I stumbled across 150 bd feet (mostly 4/4 and some 6/4 boards) of stickered Black Cherry in the damp cellar. It turns out that uncle Earle (Verona's late husband) had been storing this wood for a purpose unknown to anyone. Cherry doesn't grow in abundance in this part of the world so I am not sure where he got this wood. He was however in the lumber trade business and operated a portable sawmill years ago according to various family members.

Once I inspected the wood, there was about 120 bd feet of usable cherry by my calculations. The remaining 30 feet was molded badly, presumably due to years of storage in the damp cellar.

After settling on a purchase price with the family, the wood was re-located to my house and stored in my basement for the next 6 months next to a dehumidifier. This coincided with the kitchen reno discussions Diane and I were in the midst of. I figured there would be enough cherry to at least get a good start on the raised panel doors and drawer fronts.

I was able to get the 4/4 wood down to approximately 8% MC by spring 2010. From what I read, this is a stable enough MC level to start milling parts for doors, cabinet end-panels and drawer fronts like these ones:

Sleeve Comfort Wood Curtain Beige


Door Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


Comments were made that Uncle Earle would've been happy to know that someone in the family was putting this wood to good use creating a nice sentimental feeling as I worked with this wood.

Another 120 bd feet of kiln dried cherry would be purchased from a local lumberyard in the summer of 2010 - hopefully enough to finish the whole kitchen. I'll be sure not to mix the air dried cherry with the kiln dried cherry!
Jon,

Not only will your kitchen be beautiful made with cherry, but the provenance will add greatly to the ongoing story.

L/W
 

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About the Cherry...

A gift from Uncle Earle

In late 2009, while packing up Aunt Verona's (Diane's sister) farmhouse in rural New Brunswick, I stumbled across 150 bd feet (mostly 4/4 and some 6/4 boards) of stickered Black Cherry in the damp cellar. It turns out that uncle Earle (Verona's late husband) had been storing this wood for a purpose unknown to anyone. Cherry doesn't grow in abundance in this part of the world so I am not sure where he got this wood. He was however in the lumber trade business and operated a portable sawmill years ago according to various family members.

Once I inspected the wood, there was about 120 bd feet of usable cherry by my calculations. The remaining 30 feet was molded badly, presumably due to years of storage in the damp cellar.

After settling on a purchase price with the family, the wood was re-located to my house and stored in my basement for the next 6 months next to a dehumidifier. This coincided with the kitchen reno discussions Diane and I were in the midst of. I figured there would be enough cherry to at least get a good start on the raised panel doors and drawer fronts.

I was able to get the 4/4 wood down to approximately 8% MC by spring 2010. From what I read, this is a stable enough MC level to start milling parts for doors, cabinet end-panels and drawer fronts like these ones:

Sleeve Comfort Wood Curtain Beige


Door Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


Comments were made that Uncle Earle would've been happy to know that someone in the family was putting this wood to good use creating a nice sentimental feeling as I worked with this wood.

Another 120 bd feet of kiln dried cherry would be purchased from a local lumberyard in the summer of 2010 - hopefully enough to finish the whole kitchen. I'll be sure not to mix the air dried cherry with the kiln dried cherry!
Looking good buddy, can't wait to see the finished kitchen!
 

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About the Cherry...

A gift from Uncle Earle

In late 2009, while packing up Aunt Verona's (Diane's sister) farmhouse in rural New Brunswick, I stumbled across 150 bd feet (mostly 4/4 and some 6/4 boards) of stickered Black Cherry in the damp cellar. It turns out that uncle Earle (Verona's late husband) had been storing this wood for a purpose unknown to anyone. Cherry doesn't grow in abundance in this part of the world so I am not sure where he got this wood. He was however in the lumber trade business and operated a portable sawmill years ago according to various family members.

Once I inspected the wood, there was about 120 bd feet of usable cherry by my calculations. The remaining 30 feet was molded badly, presumably due to years of storage in the damp cellar.

After settling on a purchase price with the family, the wood was re-located to my house and stored in my basement for the next 6 months next to a dehumidifier. This coincided with the kitchen reno discussions Diane and I were in the midst of. I figured there would be enough cherry to at least get a good start on the raised panel doors and drawer fronts.

I was able to get the 4/4 wood down to approximately 8% MC by spring 2010. From what I read, this is a stable enough MC level to start milling parts for doors, cabinet end-panels and drawer fronts like these ones:

Sleeve Comfort Wood Curtain Beige


Door Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


Comments were made that Uncle Earle would've been happy to know that someone in the family was putting this wood to good use creating a nice sentimental feeling as I worked with this wood.

Another 120 bd feet of kiln dried cherry would be purchased from a local lumberyard in the summer of 2010 - hopefully enough to finish the whole kitchen. I'll be sure not to mix the air dried cherry with the kiln dried cherry!
This will be a showcase of a kitchen.
 

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2,604 Posts
About the Cherry...

A gift from Uncle Earle

In late 2009, while packing up Aunt Verona's (Diane's sister) farmhouse in rural New Brunswick, I stumbled across 150 bd feet (mostly 4/4 and some 6/4 boards) of stickered Black Cherry in the damp cellar. It turns out that uncle Earle (Verona's late husband) had been storing this wood for a purpose unknown to anyone. Cherry doesn't grow in abundance in this part of the world so I am not sure where he got this wood. He was however in the lumber trade business and operated a portable sawmill years ago according to various family members.

Once I inspected the wood, there was about 120 bd feet of usable cherry by my calculations. The remaining 30 feet was molded badly, presumably due to years of storage in the damp cellar.

After settling on a purchase price with the family, the wood was re-located to my house and stored in my basement for the next 6 months next to a dehumidifier. This coincided with the kitchen reno discussions Diane and I were in the midst of. I figured there would be enough cherry to at least get a good start on the raised panel doors and drawer fronts.

I was able to get the 4/4 wood down to approximately 8% MC by spring 2010. From what I read, this is a stable enough MC level to start milling parts for doors, cabinet end-panels and drawer fronts like these ones:

Sleeve Comfort Wood Curtain Beige


Door Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain


Comments were made that Uncle Earle would've been happy to know that someone in the family was putting this wood to good use creating a nice sentimental feeling as I worked with this wood.

Another 120 bd feet of kiln dried cherry would be purchased from a local lumberyard in the summer of 2010 - hopefully enough to finish the whole kitchen. I'll be sure not to mix the air dried cherry with the kiln dried cherry!
Raise your hand and give a high 5 to Uncle Earle! I love cherry cabinets.

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Things are starting to take shape...

March 2011 Update

There were no cabinets on this wall previous to the renovation - basically just a desk/hutch combo and a chest of drawers:

Empty space before

Paint Fixture Wood Building Wall


After

This wall now has an 18" W x 24" D pantry unit, with 12" deep wall and 24" deep base cabinets giving them all kinds of new storage capacity. Diane decided to go for a solid maple counter top on this side of the kitchen to change things up a bit. All of the remaining base cabinets in the kitchen will receive an acrylic (Corian) counter top.

Furniture Cabinetry Wood Table Rectangle


I just finished mounting the under-cabinet lighting using a "light rail" to hide the light fixtures and associated wiring. I made the light rail on my router table with the same router bit I am using for making all of the raised panel doors & drawers. You can see a bit of the profile in the picture below:

Brown Furniture Building Table Wood


With some shelves installed…Jello anyone?

Building Wood Rectangle Window Wood stain


Sighting down the counter top from the end…I love Cherry!

Brown Amber Wood Flooring Floor


So long for now. I will back in April with more updates.

- jonww
 

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189 Posts
Things are starting to take shape...

March 2011 Update

There were no cabinets on this wall previous to the renovation - basically just a desk/hutch combo and a chest of drawers:

Empty space before

Paint Fixture Wood Building Wall


After

This wall now has an 18" W x 24" D pantry unit, with 12" deep wall and 24" deep base cabinets giving them all kinds of new storage capacity. Diane decided to go for a solid maple counter top on this side of the kitchen to change things up a bit. All of the remaining base cabinets in the kitchen will receive an acrylic (Corian) counter top.

Furniture Cabinetry Wood Table Rectangle


I just finished mounting the under-cabinet lighting using a "light rail" to hide the light fixtures and associated wiring. I made the light rail on my router table with the same router bit I am using for making all of the raised panel doors & drawers. You can see a bit of the profile in the picture below:

Brown Furniture Building Table Wood


With some shelves installed…Jello anyone?

Building Wood Rectangle Window Wood stain


Sighting down the counter top from the end…I love Cherry!

Brown Amber Wood Flooring Floor


So long for now. I will back in April with more updates.

- jonww
Looks great, nice design. Look forward to seeing more.
 

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