LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 20 of 234 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,500 Posts
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
I have a 3/8" or so engineered hardwood floor on cement. I would agree with you to go with 3/4 and make it solid wood. We have a number of wear spots now and refinishing is really not an option. The floor is a good 5 years old now.

The cabinet looks great. She should love it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
Thanks for the info Wayne. I made my own flooring for the kitchen in New Jersey. I resawed maple boards into 1/2" thick and surfaced to 3/8". I made tongue and groove and said never again for that project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
A piece of cherry 19" w. is almost a unheard of these days. Just watch for cupping. My grandparents had a very small walk in pantry with a curtain hung across the opening.

When I remodeled our house we had hardwood flooring glued down to the concrete and we haven't had any trouble yet and that was 6 years ago.

Good luck with all of your projects they all sound like this could take some time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,975 Posts
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
Karson -

Very interesting project ahead - I will enjoy seeing how you progress. The cabinet is beautiful and looks like a great place to start. Are you going to vacuum press your cherry burl veneer? I am just starting to experiment with a vacuum press (I saw you gave a class to the your woodworking association) so I will be looking forward to your future postings on this project (and of course I love cherry so I agree wih your choice of wood!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
Thanks for the comments. I'll try to keep a look out for cupping Rog. I believe it has air dried for 4-5 years.

David Yes I'll be using a vacuum press for the veneer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,967 Posts
Buffet and Hutch

My wife says I can't do anything else before I start on her Kitchen. Well except for her hall table and ??. Of course there is also the Summer Contest.

This is going to be a multiple phase project. I need to do something with the floor. We are on a cement slab floor and it is killing both of our legs. The kitchen had a Pergo floor when we bought the house, but we had a frozen water line before we moved in and the Pergo floor got curled edges, so it was all pulled up.

I don't' think I want 3/8" inch flooring and I'm leaning to solid hardwood 3/4" thick. Either on the cement or over a spacer board underneath. I don't know what I'll do yet. I'm still researching.

So in the interim I going to start to build a couple of furniture pieces that will be in the kitchen.

The first is a Buffet / Hutch. This is from Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb of 2007. I don't plan on making this exact design. I don't know if we will have glass in the upper cabinet. I want all drawers on the bottom not cabinet doors. But, the construction details are fairly solid.
. I'm starting to draw the full size legs with all of the mortise for the styles and rails. They used 1/2" plywood for the sides and backs, but I'll probably go with 3/4 and put some burl cherry veneer on it. The wood will be cherry. I'll get to use the 19" cherry board for the Buffet top surface. I'll have to glue on a 1 1/2" piece at the back to make it 21 1/2. Of course my planer is only 20" wide so I'll have to finish up the joint with a hand plane or scraper.

I plan to take down a wall that is beside the refrigerator to make it an "L" shaped kitchen. There is no dining room so it is an eat-in-kitchen. The previous owner took down a half-wall between the kitchen area and the eating area.

I plan to build a couple of furniture items 1) The Buffet and 2) A storage pantry for all of the can goods.

The floor area is approx 400 Sq Ft. after I take out the wall.

I'm waiting for a woodworker club member to finish assembling a pantry cabinet that he is building for a commission. I want to show it to my wife. She is not good at visualizing without pictures or actual items.

She wants the kitchen light, but I'm going to sneak in this Cherry Buffet while the color is still light and then let it age in her kitchen.

She's happy with Dave's Cherry Thorsen Table. So it might be a good match. When i start working on the rest of the cabinets we'll see what the wood becomes, and also the floor.

Any suggestions or pictures of a storage pantry would be nice if you have some.
Now that's off to a nice start! Thanks, Karson!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,500 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Good clear instructions. Thanks for sharing.

P.S. We are thinking along similar lines. About to the the Tri Tip of the smoker. They have been on for about 3 hours. Hickory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Thanks for sharing Karson….talk more about how you develop your story poles. Do you mark and label all the critical dimensions on the plywood and then transfer to the pieces?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Bob:

The plans in Fine Woodworking, even though nice are not useful for making a project easily. Some of the dimensions are on the pictures and sometimes they are in the article. And sometimes they are wrong. I mean that most magazines post errata with changes, but when you are trying to find dimensions and position for mortises and you have to look all over the place to find them, It doesn't make them easy.

So for my story stick, I made a full size cutting of plywood. I started marking the positions of the mortises, and I realized that most of the mortises have a 1/4" cut on all sides. So a 3/4" thick piece had a 1/4" mortise and tenon. The rails at the top and bottom have a 1/4" grove cut in them to allow for plywood for the insert. The top rail ended up with a 1/2" cut for the tenon, where it touched the panel, while the bottom one had still the 1/4" cut. Why the difference. ??

The overall length was 33" that was stated in two different places. So I figured that was OK. The bottom has a taper for the last 5". OK. The bottom apron didn't state anything where it belonged. I surmised that it matched the side, so that is where I placed it.

The mortise slots for the top rails were shown in the pictures, but the dimensions turned out to be incorrect. No where is the panel size shown, you have to calculate that out by yourself. The length of the rails are not shown, only the width. The visible length is stated on a sideways picture, and you know that you cut 1" deep mortises, but you can't put in 1" in length tenons because they might hit solid trash in the bottom of the mortise. So probably 7/8" is OK. I'll cut for a 1" and try during dry-fitting but be prepared to shorten if necessary.

So to answer your question, I made all markings from the top edge of the leg, so if one was marked off then the one below would not also be off.

Since I putting in drawers and not shelves, I also had to design my drawer supports and draw them on the story stick.

As it turned out, one story stick was for the front inside edges, (edges 8 and 1) The other story stick has the measurements for the top and bottom rails and the plywood groove. It worked out to be OK for the sides and also the back. The sides (edges 2 & 3, and 6 & 7) also need my drawer supports, while the back does not need them. So it is on the story stick but not transferred to the leg.

The story stick is quite messy because I had to write in ink, because the pencil didn't show up very well. But after I wrote something down, I then found that I need another cutting in the same place as the writing. But I'll never make it over. This maybe a first and only time construction. But, I'll keep my plans just in case.

I cut the square mortises 1 1/16" deep for all of the mortise slots. I then went to the horizontal router table and cut the 1/4" X 1/4" slots for the plywood. They cut up into where the mortise slots were placed for the rails. The legs take the place of styles on the sides. On the back there are some internal styles. But I'll need a new story stick for those measurements.

Any more questions, keep them coming and keep me honest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,890 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
This is a wonderful "how to". You need to add a "how to" tag to this so we can find it later!! (that and I'm going add it to my favourites for future reference)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,967 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Nice, karson! An excellent howto! I've looked at FWW plans before and I don't do well with the befuddled look. Nice job!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
I really like your detailed planning. I am finally starting to recognize the benefits of planning in detail.

Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,861 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
A story stick is a great way to eliminate measuring mistakes, especially when duplicating parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,858 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Thanks for the explanation Karson….what do you mean by "solid trash at the bottom of the mortice"?

Are these plans that you bought from FWW?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Bob: Since the mortise is 1/4" wide and the smallest chisle is 1/4" wide and not wanting to make the mortise wider. have opted to leave the holes as drilled. so there might be small pieces of wood at the bottom. A square chisle with a round drill bit in the middle of it does not get all of the wood out.

That is what I was referring to as trash. I've knocked out all drill tailings but some wood fibers are visable and present. Dry fitting might get rid of them.
 
Joined
·
13,555 Posts
Making the legs.

Well I started the Buffet / Hutch. If I don't get started I won't have anything to say without getting myself in trouble, when my wife asks me what I'm making in the shop.

I started out by making a full size template on plywood for all of the milling that needs to be done on the legs.



Can you believe that those two templates have all of the instructions for milling 8 surfaces on the legs?
Now you may ask what do you mean by 8 surfaces. This is the way that I was taught when you make a project with legs.



You number them. The right front is 1 and you go counterclock wise to 8. You only number the surfaces that touch another leg. Surfaces 1 and 8 are the front.

This allows you to make items like aprons and then you label the ends with the appropriate numbers. You might see the numbers on the shelf supports on the Thorsen Tables that I worked on.



When you dry fit a part you label it so that when you start to glue, you know that you have all of the appropriate parts, and the one's you don't need are put away. This keeps you from gluing the wrong part in at the wrong place.

After labeling the legs, I then put the marks for the mortises on the legs.



Then it was then on to the mortise machine to cut out square holes.



Cutting out the spaces between the ends of the mortise.



When you get done you better have matching holes in each of the adjoining pieces



Then it's out to the Horizontal Router to cut the long mortises for the side panels.



Note to self and others Router bits do break. This one just dropped to the ground and didn't go flying around. Praise the Lord! New router bit and complete the job.



Line up the ends in number order and verify that the cuts were made correctly.



Then match the other sides and check them out.



This is the pattern that I'm modifying for my kitchen. Fine Woodworking Jan / Feb 2007.



All done for tonight now to eat smoked chicken that was cooking with cherry wood smoke.
Looks good!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,383 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Buffet / Hutch Cutting the Stiles and Rails

The continuation of the Buffet / Hutch build. Today was a busy day, just not in the shop. Lunch with my wife, pick up the kids at school, etc. So when I got into the shop it was after dark.

I posted a blog on
Hardwood Lumber Grading
This is why. My best friend, who I moved away from when I moved to Delaware, and I went together to purchase some wood that was rated as Select. I was unable to go pick it up, but he went and picked up the wood.

If I had been there I think I would have walked away from the deal. It looks like to me that the seller cherry picked (not a pun on words) the select cherry and sold it to someone else or these boards were kicked out by a previous buyer. Here is the front of some of the boards. Yes they look like select lumber, Maybe a little light on the length.



But, here is the reverse side



The hardwood grading article has this statement when talking about No 2A Common: "The smallest clear cutting allowed is 3" by 2' and the number of these cuttings depends on the size of the board. If the poorest face meets the minimum requirements for Number 2A Common, it does not matter what the grade of the
better face is."

These boards are Select on the front face but maybe not even 2A Common on the back. If you were making a piece of furniture and you would see both faces then these boards are not acceptable. They classify this as flooring grade. On the buffet portion of this project, you don't see the inside so I'm trying to use up this wood instead of using better wood.

I had to make a story stick of the stiles and rails, in order to get the correct dimensions of this chest. See the previous blog about my feeling about the Fine Woodworking articles on making furniture.

So the boards were cut to length;



Then it was on to the jointer to true up one edge. I previously jointed the face and planed the thickness to get clear wood. This was done to allow me to see how these boards could be used.



Back to the table saw to rip to width.



The spots you see on two boards were the sweat of my brow, working in unfavorable conditions. I need to talk to the owner about that. I need Air Conditioning.

I stopped to figure out my tenons on these pieces, and the mortises on the rails for the stiles to fit in. I also wanted to post this blog. Tomorrow is toy making day (Wed) so maybe tomorrow night I'll get the tenons cut and then do a dry fit.

Again here is the Buffet that I'm attempting to build except mine will be all drawers in the buffet portion.



Picture Copyright Fine Woodworking Jan/Feb 2007.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,500 Posts
Buffet / Hutch Cutting the Stiles and Rails

The continuation of the Buffet / Hutch build. Today was a busy day, just not in the shop. Lunch with my wife, pick up the kids at school, etc. So when I got into the shop it was after dark.

I posted a blog on
Hardwood Lumber Grading
This is why. My best friend, who I moved away from when I moved to Delaware, and I went together to purchase some wood that was rated as Select. I was unable to go pick it up, but he went and picked up the wood.

If I had been there I think I would have walked away from the deal. It looks like to me that the seller cherry picked (not a pun on words) the select cherry and sold it to someone else or these boards were kicked out by a previous buyer. Here is the front of some of the boards. Yes they look like select lumber, Maybe a little light on the length.



But, here is the reverse side



The hardwood grading article has this statement when talking about No 2A Common: "The smallest clear cutting allowed is 3" by 2' and the number of these cuttings depends on the size of the board. If the poorest face meets the minimum requirements for Number 2A Common, it does not matter what the grade of the
better face is."

These boards are Select on the front face but maybe not even 2A Common on the back. If you were making a piece of furniture and you would see both faces then these boards are not acceptable. They classify this as flooring grade. On the buffet portion of this project, you don't see the inside so I'm trying to use up this wood instead of using better wood.

I had to make a story stick of the stiles and rails, in order to get the correct dimensions of this chest. See the previous blog about my feeling about the Fine Woodworking articles on making furniture.

So the boards were cut to length;



Then it was on to the jointer to true up one edge. I previously jointed the face and planed the thickness to get clear wood. This was done to allow me to see how these boards could be used.



Back to the table saw to rip to width.



The spots you see on two boards were the sweat of my brow, working in unfavorable conditions. I need to talk to the owner about that. I need Air Conditioning.

I stopped to figure out my tenons on these pieces, and the mortises on the rails for the stiles to fit in. I also wanted to post this blog. Tomorrow is toy making day (Wed) so maybe tomorrow night I'll get the tenons cut and then do a dry fit.

Again here is the Buffet that I'm attempting to build except mine will be all drawers in the buffet portion.



Picture Copyright Fine Woodworking Jan/Feb 2007.
I guess I should study the pamplet. I'm a little too trusting of the lumber dealers.
 
1 - 20 of 234 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top