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Discussion Starter · #521 ·
I've got it milled down to 1-1/2 inches now but expecting company soon so had to clean up and will mill it the rest of the way soon.

I would normally resaw off the excess but, … two things:

1. Re-saving is currently a chore until I finish this tool

2. I need plenty of fresh grounds to fill the pores when finishing

I purchased a coffee grinder to finely mill the large particles that come off the surfacing. The fine dust will be mixed and pushed into the grain to fill the pores.
 

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I got the board thicknessed down to 1-1/4 inches but that was arguably the easiest part.

Now, here's a topic for discussion.

I don't know if it helps - have not done any scientific study - but after I smooth plane to final thickness, I like to leave the board super-glued to the planing surface for a couple days to ensure it doesn't change shape on me after planing. Meaning …

The way that I thickness lumber is to:

1. "Super glue" (two strips of painter's tape with CA glue between) the board down
2. Plane flat one side
3. Flip and super glue the flat side down
4. Use router surfacing jig to make a parallel side
5. Plane smooth

Depending on how much I remove in step 4, sometimes the board can cup by the next day.

However, I have made it part of my routine to just let it sit there for a day or two after step 5. I come back to it, re-check it, admire it, so on and so forth. Then eventually lift it up.

Not sure if the hold down method allows it to relax and resist changing shape on me after and maybe it's all in my head (like many things) or perhaps it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #525 ·
Not like you haven't seen this before, but you can see that:

1. I realized it would be easier to mill everything out from the flip side since there were more features on one versus the other

2. The small parts posed a slight challenge in determining how to not only mill features on 3 axes but to do it in

2.a. As few setup operations as possible

2.b. While maintaining the greatest part integrity throughout the process

2.c. And only parting out at the end when all the features have been milled

Specifically referring to the bushing, bearing, and adjuster block. The bushing needs features on two axes, as does the bearing, but the adjuster block needs on three.

I am also adding anchors, fixing up color coding for the Shaper Origin, annotating all the required depths and diameters, etc.

Still more to come though. I need to pull up my notes on these M6 threaded inserts and set the depth for that cut.

Then it's on to designing the fence.

Oh, one more thing, you'll notice that I added a pocket above the handle that contours it nicely. This is going to be a trick handle where it looks at first glance like I milled it separately out of 3/4 inch stock and glued it in, but in reality I am going to mill a 1/4 inch off each side of the handle to get a 3/4 inch integrated handle out of the 1-1/4 inch thick tool.

ASIDE: I thought about doing an offset handle. What are folks thoughts? Old hand tools at one time had offset handles. Like plow planes, this could offset since you can't really easily switch hands with it anyway (a left-handed tool would be more appropriate I think than just centering the handle).

Font Gadget Electronic device Multimedia Electric blue


Font Clock Gadget Screenshot Electric blue


Fin Font Logo Circle Symbol
 

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I had been thinking about how to incorporate a skate that was "optional" on the auxiliary fence for the purpose of kerf bending (either clamp a call to the middle of the board to ensure perpendicular cross cut or start at the end of the board with the fence) and then after the first cut just slot the skate into the previous cut to make repeated cuts precisely spaced.

I went to my shop and made a token cut with the Ryoba to see what could pass for a skate.

I found some 24×10 sheets of steel shimstock precision ground to 1/64" in thickness that actually works extremely well as a skate. So well, in-fact, that I am very excited.

Of course the skate is thin so don't want it always exposed, so I came up with the idea of a piece of wood that can be bolted to the auxiliary fence to shroud the exposed portion of the skate turning it into a surface plate for the regular auxiliary fence.

Best part is, no fiddly bits.

I guess you may just have to see it once finished.
 

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Super excited that this project will now incorporate some steel work.

EDIT: I don't consider cutting steel bolts with a hacksaw to be steel work. But, using cold chisels, peening edges, running end mill toolpaths, now that's what I consider steel work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #530 ·
Wow, what a ride! It took me a good (checks date on above posts) full week to come up with the fence. I have known since the beginning of this project that I did not want to make a simple fence comprised of one or two flat boards with a simple bull nose profile. Nay, I want to make a fence like 19th century plow/plough planes or moving fillister planes. You know the ones I am talking about, the ones that look like a cornice or crown molding.

Of course, there has to be a reason-one that I would not know until digesting Whelan in his entirety.

When you cradle the fence on a wooden plow plane, there is but one goal: ride along the face to make a perpendicular cut. The fence has two functions to support this goal: a right angle and something to hold on to. Then, you have to consider how those functions are utilized based on the fence design.

Comparing a flat fence (see Tom Fidgen) to a molded fence (see D.L. Barrett & Sons) the molded fence offers two things the flat fence does not for feeling plumb while you work.

As Whelan states, after the molding is cut into the fence, it is rotated 90 degrees in the vice and the end grain is cut with the same profile. This affords the user the ability to hang over the leading arm and use sideways pressure with a finger. See the young man in the film on this page

This allows one to work in situations where you cannot easily access the underside of the fence without, say, knocking your knuckles into the vise.

But what of the underside of the molded vs flat fence? I am glad you asked.

We want to feel plumb when we are using a hand tool saddled over an edge. The design of the fence should aid in feeling plumb. But moreover, it should allow you to stay plumb and that means a few things:

1. Being able to get your fingers behind the fence because the molded fence transitions to more vertical than horizontal over its length means-like when edge jointing a long board with a hand plane-you can keep pressure where it is needed (in the example of edge jointing a board, you would put a thumb over the toe and avoid using the knob, helping alleviate levered pressure [should you use the knob] and keeping pressure instead directly above the working edge.

2. With a flat fence, it is the crook of your hand doing all the work to keep the face plumb. And the crook of your hand is rather far from your fingers. And gripping a flat board for hours will lead to pain in your hands. It is much easier to grip something that is not perfectly flat. The molded fence affords some real estate to relax. The molded fence affords you the choice to push with the crook of your hand (on the bull-nose edge of the fence projecting away from the face of the fence) or you can push with your fingers-or if the profile (as is the case in my design) has a cove for your fingers, you could actually do a combination where you grip the cove to push the bullnose into the crook of your hand which is then used to stabilize the face. You have multiple options.

Of course, you could completely ignore the fence altogether and just say the hell with it, ... I don't need to feel plumb, I din't need to hold the fence, and I certainly don't need to use it like a plow plane. That's an option. I put an even more substantial horn on the front of my plane if that's the way you like to work.

I believe by designing a molded fence, I will afford more capabilities to the way it is used.

Over fence grip? Yes
Under fence? Yes
Beak grip? Yes
Pressure cove? Yes
Overboard? I don't know. You look at D.L. Barrett & Sons and they clearly take pride in their molded fences. 19th century wooden plow plane makers took pride. Grain orientations were accounted for, feel in the hand was important, and the tool was made for endurance.

So, with that, I share with you …

Ovolo Bevel Scotia Beak Scotia Quirk Bevel Bevel Beak with brass rod inlay



I think it's going to be a hit for comfort and functionality. Of course, how am I going to pull it off? Shaper Origin, of course, ...



What will it look like on the plane? Here is the profile view of the past week's work on designing the fence from the parts I have.

ASIDE: The socket cap screws I previously purchased proved to be too heady for the job ultimately I went to OSH and bought new button head socket cap screws. Also, while at OSH I picked up some cheap Alan wrenches and got the idea of just throwing a magnet into the thing and creating a recess to hold the dang thing so I always have it near the tool. The Alan key would be for removing the auxiliary fence(s)-yes, that's right, it has not one auxiliary fence, but TWO-they serve different purposes. I haven't revealed that part of the design yet. I also haven't revealed the secret as to how I am going to make an auxiliary fence that is only 3/8" thick and yet 3" wide and 12" long while still staying flat without warp (regardless of how it is sealed).



And here is a fresh image of the side of the unit (again, you can see I added to it-also the arms came down, because I only have about 2" x 3/4" x 12" of Ebony that I wanted to use for the main fence, so things got compressed a little.

 

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holy moley dev you got me spinning girl. im not even gonna try and understand what your exactly doing but im sure it's gonna be impressive.cant wait for this bird to land !
 

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Discussion Starter · #532 ·
I'm not too certain about sticking split washers under the thumb screws positioned over the 1/2" brass arms.

My thinking in putting them there is that I want some positive protection against vibration from working the screw loose (which is not really holding the fence in place per-se, but rather is just taking out any slop from the micro-adjust screw that moves the fence in and out). However, in looking at 19th century and similar wooden plow planes, they don't use knurled thumb screws, they use kind of a "paddle" top screw (like a wing screw but not wings per-se).

I won't know until I sink a threaded insert into some wood and see if I can turn the threaded screw against the split washer. My suspicion is that I am worried about nothing and that the … /me checks … 3/4" diameter knurled head on the thumb screw will provide enough torque to cinch even partially down on the split washer-affording me what I want without having to swap out the thumb screw for a paddle/wing screw.
 

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go with your thoughts and if it's not right you modify. but that will need to be tested with use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #534 ·
Oh, I had a real shock last weekend.

When I went to OSH to get those button head socket cap screws, I found some that fit the bill that were 88 cents a piece. However, I wasn't lovin' on the black coating which was rough to the touch. I'm used to things being shiny.

So, I sauntered over to the shiny section, and …

What on EARTH!? The same exact screw was almost $6 PER-SCREW for shiny chrome (assuming plated) screw versus 88 cents per-screw for the black ones.

Grrrrrrrrrr, well, screw 'em (pun intended), when I got back from the store (with the cheap screws), I just modified the design slightly for blind taps so I don't have to look at the screw heads (only if I turn the thing over will I see them).

However, I feel … cheap. Like, I got the best of the best parts for everything else on this thing (including the wood; all exotics), but, ... I then go and cheap out on the screws. I just couldn't justify paying almost $80 for 12 screws. Grrrr.

Wondering if OSH is just the worst possible place to buy screws and I should just check eBay or McMaster or … not sure why OSH is trying to charge nearly $6 per screw for chrome button had socket cap in 1/4"-20 by 5/8
 

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6$ for a screw ? were they 24k gold plated for gods sake. yeah id of passed myself ! i could have made a comment with this but it would not have been "family friendly" dev -lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #539 ·
Been working out more and more details. Annotating every little detail, moving on to different angles, etc.

Now, ... those that have been following this forum thread for a while will of course say (and have said) that this process is entirely too long.

I personally have to agree. Here's a first-hand perspective:

1. Using Inkscape to generate files for Shaper Origin is really really slow if the project is complicated (as this one is -- where thousandths of an inch matter in dozens of places and grain direction is paramount in select parts).

2. Using Inkscape means that I am working in 2D and when I finish with one side, I then have to re-do everything at a different angle. I see other creators using 3D programs that if I could find a faster workflow (more of a question for the Shaper Hub than here -- answers not expected, but if there are any Shaper Origin users here that work in 3D I am interested).

I am not complaining at all. I just think perhaps working in 3D might be faster.

With that being said, here's the eye candy showing my latest work. I still have a few more angles to produce, so we're not done yet -- if I do one new angle every 2 weeks, we could see this thing before year end.

Font Parallel Technology Diagram Rectangle

Product Font Line Parallel Electric blue


ASIDE: Yes, I modeled my own hand (or at least the crook and thumb) so I could make sure I leave room for my thumb and can potentially strategically place items for hooking my thumb around
 
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