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I have been unable to reach either Blackburn Tools or Bad Axe tools. So I am going to make my own kerning plane/saw. I think I can improve on the designs I have seem from others.

How about:

1. Adjustable depth of cut via thumb screw
2. Adjustable angle of attack
3. Spring tensioned blade that retracts into the body of the plane
4. Adjustable spring tension
5. Replaceable blade
6. No fence, or one, or two adjustable fence
7. A plexiglass window to see the inside of the plane
8. Markings on the window to indicate depth and angle

I could:

a. Set the depth of cut to 1/2"
b. Lift the nose of the blade to make it easier to enter the wood and prevent clogging
c. Push the plane and fence flat against the wood, compressing the internal springs causing the blade to retract into the bode of the plane while it is stationary

And as I push the plane, the blade automatically descends into the wood until it reaches the full 1/2" depth when it no longer takes a cut.

Also, if I have two fences, I can just sandwich the board which would make kerfing the end end grain on narrow boards easier.

What do you think?
 

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I think it sounds over-designed which sounds perfect for you. I find that my most common use case is splitting a 3/4 board into two 3/8 (or 1/4) pieces, and next most common is turning 4/4 into three 1/4 pieces. So I made a fixed fence at 3/8, and if I'm looking to get three pieces from a 4/4 board, I'll tack a piece of 1/16 ash veneer to the fence to make it 5/16, which is close enough to 1/3 for most of my work.

The cheap Great Neck saws on Amazon work fairly well as kerfing plane blades. They're induction hardened, so not resharpenable, but they're cheap enough that that doesn't bother me, and they'll still work fine even with half the teeth sheared off. Cutting a saw plate is hard work, but with the induction-hardened saws, it's only the toothy bit that's super-hard, and the bulk of the saw plate isn't too bad. Expect to use up a hacksaw blade, though.

Or if you're just looking for a saw plate, Erik at Florip Toolworks may be able to set you up. He's a great guy, and sells saw plates so it's not a crazy request for him. I think he'll sell you saw nuts too, if you need.

Good luck on the build!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dunno what saw nuts are. Let me go google that real quick. I've seen most people cut the plate with tin snips. I picked up a cheap Stanley finishing saw at 10-11 TPI with trip-point teeth that looked like it might be a good fit (was under $15). Looks like only the teeth are hardened.

You may be right that it's way over kill. Like trying to use a combination plane instead of a moulding plane to produce the same decorative edge. Moulding plane is just "pick it up and go" while the combination plane requires being set up first and you may want to leave it in that combination requiring you to own multiple combination planes anyways.

My immediate needs are that I need to be able to rip lumber as close to 27/32" and 3/8" as possible-those are the two sizes I most commonly need (right now).

I of course usually rip to width with some room to spare and plane the rest of the way. So I'm usually ripping to 1/16" or 1/8" over the desired width right now without a kerfing plane because of the dreaded dishing-out of the center when a cut veers off-line.

The kerfing plane will allow me to saw much closer to my desired width and spend less time planing to get the board I need.

However, watching a lot of videos of YouTube, almost everybody I watch (except Tom Fidgen) looks like they are having a hard time controlling the plane. When they push the plane through the wood, it rears up, skips, and tilts.

On one occasion in one video from Tom Fidgen, I saw it rear up on him, so not even he was immune to the issues that I see.

I thought to myself "why is it rearing up on them?" and "can we eliminate that?"

I think if a push saw is used and the nose is raised or if a pull saw is used and the heel is raised, then it would work more like an actual saw.

One video demonstrated how the kerf becomes clogged and how to unclog it by pushing through it. I think that too could be solved by an angled attack.

The problem for me isn't in deciding that it would be a good idea to angle of attack by rotating the blade in the body of the plane, but how much to do so. That's where the adjustable depth comes into play (angle of attack being simply the adjustment of two different depths for rear versus front of the plate).
 

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A good design challenge. You may want to remember that it is traditionally only for ripping, so a combo or crosscut tooth will be inefficient (and clog easier).

"I've seen most people cut the plate with tin snips." If the plate is hardened, that won't happen. I had to grind a groove and snap the steel. I think Lazyman Nathan had a similar experience.

Enjoy the build, and design, and experience.
 

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My kerfing plane is an old wooden plow plane that somebody (long ago) made a body for and screwed part of a saw plate to. Its crude, kind of cool looking frankenplane, and works PERFECTLY! Have only ever needed the one fence as I am usually splitting 3/4 or trying to to take off an 1/8" for veneer. No need for anything fancy to cut a saw kerf lol!

Also, cutting saw plates with snips tends to bend the metal. I prefer to lay it one some scrap wood and use a grinder with cutoff wheel to cut through, leaving the plate straight.
 

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OK, so you think perhaps most people are choosing the wrong kind of saw tooth configuration for their plane and that's why they are (in their videos on YouTube) having such a poor performance? I can see that.

I am contemplating just using this blade and not cutting it (just putting holes in it down the center) which would allow me to flip the blade over if I needed to make a kerf across the grain.

I saw someone using their kerfing plane for something other than resawing, where they used it to make the kerf for a rip cut to rip their board to width (not thickness). I thought this was interesting, and-as expected-they reported that it didn't work too well when they had to make the kerf cutting across the grain.

However, sticking that big blade in a plane would make a pretty tall plane (which would be prone to tipping). So not my first choice-which would be to simply cut the blade in 2 places to make 2 plates (jettisoning the center of the blade).

I want to make kerfs for my saw which is the same saw as the above-linked blade. That may be less than ideal because I have heard some folks say that the best resaw is when the kerf is slightly undersized for the saw. But what saw is thinner than a Vaughan Ryoba-style Bear saw which I measured at 1/32" thin
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I found these blades which seem like they would fit the bill.

The kerf on these 0.023" thick blades is 0.031", which is just slightly undersized for 1/32" thin Ryoba blade.

Plus, I don't think I would have to cut those blades. I could probably use them as-is.
 

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Maybe check with local saw shops, the one I get the band saw blades made at has every type of blade you could require and they gave me some cut off scraps for the bow saw I made plus had enough left over for a small Kerf saw when and if I ever get around to making one? My thought plan was to make a removable blade cartridge with the blade position being the thickness gauge? Blades would be replaceable. held in by 2 brass pins, same as my Bow Saw.
 

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Despite my elaborate plans (which I sometimes pull off-when there is good reason), I do often take the easiest way out until there is no other choice but to do the complicated solution.

It just occurred to me how I can avoid having to make a kerfing plane/saw for a little while.

1. Secure the wood you need to resaw
2. Take a piece of wood that is as-wide as the saw blade but not as-long
3. Clamp a similar-length but wider piece of wood to the above
4. Clamp the assembly to the wood you need to resaw
5. Holding the saw with one hand and with your other hand on the blade
6. Use a flush-cutting motion against the make-shift fence to create the kerf

It's just slightly more sophisticated than what I did here

Where I use a random cutoff of Bocote (that I knew to be flat and have square sides) to guide the start of a cut at the corners. Instead of just chucking that little block back onto the shelf after starting my cut, I'm thinking why not just clamp a fence to it and then clamp that to the board and move it all around as I cut a kerf line before starting the resaw?
 

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Despite my elaborate plans (which I sometimes pull off-when there is good reason), I do often take the easiest way out until there is no other choice but to do the complicated solution.

It just occurred to me how I can avoid having to make a kerfing plane/saw for a little while.

1. Secure the wood you need to resaw
2. Take a piece of wood that is as-wide as the saw blade but not as-long
3. Clamp a similar-length but wider piece of wood to the above
4. Clamp the assembly to the wood you need to resaw
5. Holding the saw with one hand and with your other hand on the blade
6. Use a flush-cutting motion against the make-shift fence to create the kerf

It s just slightly more sophisticated than what I did here

Where I use a random cutoff of Bocote (that I knew to be flat and have square sides) to guide the start of a cut at the corners. Instead of just chucking that little block back onto the shelf after starting my cut, I m thinking why not just clamp a fence to it and then clamp that to the board and move it all around as I cut a kerf line before starting the resaw?

- DevinT
I can't remember who it was, but one of the old timers showed how most old time makers resawed. The ones who actually built stuff and didn't have time to make fancy tools. He showed they just clamped a straight piece of wood to the board next to the cut line and ran their panel saw next to this clamped on "fence", using your left hand on top of the saw plate.

If you get as good as Paul Sellers you just do the angle and flip method and done.

If you want it to just be about the "cool tools", no shame in that either.
 

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ive seen what devin can do and there is no doubt in my mind she can make one hell of a nice kerf saw that many will envy.go girl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The thought of planing a board to width, not once but twice (once for 27/32 and again for 3/8) just to keep them around and not accidentally use them for some project is too menacing of a thought.

So I've changed my mind. I am going to make a kerfing plane, however I am going to keep it simple.

To side-step a lot of problems, such as producing the wrong size kerf for the resaw blade, I figured I would just inlay the resaw blade into a piece of wood with a brace.

I took the blade off of my Ryoba-style Vaughan Bear Saw

That hang-hole at the toe-end of the blade is just perfect for me to route a stantion to fit inside the hang-hole to limit its movement. Then I just contour the back-end of the blade that goes into the handle and incorporate that into the inlay as a raised area to further limit movement. Then all I need is a bracket to go over the length of the blade to keep it secure in the inlay relief.

I am thinking what I do is put a threaded insert into the hang-hole stantion that will allow me to put a socket cap machine screw into a counter-bored hole in the brace to secure the brace over the hang-hole. Then another threaded insert in the large round portion of the rear stantion to which there will be another socket screw securing the other end of the brace running the length of the blade.

The brace board would be large enough to cover the top teeth of the blade for safety. The brace board would have reliefs cut for the stations so that it can make full contact with the blade, so that when the socket cap screws are tightened they pull the brace into the inlay to mate with the saw plate.

The idea of being able to pull the blade out of my saw with a simple twist of a plastic knob, mount it in the carcass of a kerfing plane designed for it, make the kerfs, pull the blade out, put the handle back on, and perform the resaw, ... is rather exciting to me because it uses the resaw blade to do the kerfing.
 

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I'll add to this in case it helps, I don't know if the guy that made my kerfing plane did this on purpose or not but he made it where the body is higher on the leading edge than the trailing edge, just a bit. But i find this helps it to not get the bucking action you see in some videos. The angle of attack lets it ease into the cut rather than all at once. hopefully this pic rotates the right way:

Wood Door Gas Rectangle Hardwood
 

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devin and simple,i just dont know if thats possible ? something tells me it will start out that way then go over the top-lol. but sometimes simple is all you need.
 

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I like bringing old tools back to life. Putting together a new shop since 2019
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Devin, I think making yourself a kerfing plane is a great idea. Hope you keep us updated on what you come up with. I made one and found it to be a lot of fun to make and use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
SMP, I do believe it was intentional. I've seen it on an antique stair saw. It allows one to get a portion of the blade into the kerf before the blades start cutting, allowing you to build some speed before the blade engages while also allowing you to get some positive runway for the fence before engaging. I think this makes for a faster job end-to-end and it was likely done by someone that knew how saws work best.
 

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SMP, I do believe it was intentional. I ve seen it on an antique stair saw. It allows one to get a portion of the blade into the kerf before the blades start cutting, allowing you to build some speed before the blade engages while also allowing you to get some positive runway for the fence before engaging. I think this makes for a faster job end-to-end and it was likely done by someone that knew how saws work best.

- DevinT
yeah when I first got it I thought he may have been a hack, but when i went to use it, I thought "this is actually pretty nice", kind of like a progressive tooth on a saw like Paul Sellers shows how to file. Or if you've ever used one of Kevin Drakes DT saws, those are pretty sweet too. Kevin showed me how to use it, and I got the hang of it after a few minutes, but I just did not like the handles.
 
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