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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
Good looking wood. I wonder if he has any more.

Good luck on the turning. I'm looking with anticipation on the output.
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
By the way he used lots of tape because he had to make the box fit.
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
I'm going to have to make a special trip to Delaware to see Karson and see if I can squander some of that wood he will never use…...................LOL

Oh by the way Dad…....... HAPPY FATHERS DAY…..............................LOL
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
Thanks Jerry. I assume that you are the first of many.
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
Jeff,

Now I know where you both live.

I am sorry, but I hope you never do that to me. I don't even like my e-mail address published by anyone the I don't give permission.

I don't think this is a good idea to put anybodies address out on the Internet. Notice I just give the town and not my house number.

W. Kirk Crawford
Tularosa, New Mexico
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
Look forward to the finished platter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
Kirk just for you I removed the photo of the package.
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
That's some good looking wood. Curious to see how these turn out!
 

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Platters on my mind

Recently Karson posted a blog about some highly figured maple that he had scored. You can read the blog here:
http://lumberjocks.com/karson/blog/9086. I responded to Karson's blog and asked him to send the wood to me and I would turn it into platters. Karson agreed to send one plank from Delaware to Tennessee on the condition that I turn a platter for him. Today my friendly mail carrier delivered a rather heavy package to me.

Once the package was opened (Karson likes to use a lot of tape!) I found that there were 3 beautiful pieces of maple burl planks inside. - all cut from the same board. The largest plank is 16×16x1 and will be used to turn a platter for Karson. This piece has bark on one side that I will attempt to incorporate into the platter design.



There were also two additional maple burl blanks in the wood gloat box. One is 15×15x1 and the other is 14×15x1. Both of these will be turned into platters as well.





The platter that I will turn for Karson will be a gallery piece. As I move along with this project I will continue to post the progress in this blog series.
Highly Figured MAPLE? Did someone say MAPLE?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ready to finish

I had told Karson that I probably wouldn't be able to start on his wood gloat platter until after the 4th of July holiday, but the wood blanks he sent me have been asking to be put on the lathe ever since they arrived in Tennessee. Today I went to the shop and got an early start on turning two platters. I start all my platters the same way - decided what the shape will be, find an approximate center, drill a 3/8" diameter hole and mount to a screw chuck. What will be the inside of the platter is mounted on the screw chuck. I use a home made wooden mandrel that is mounted on a live center to put pressure on the tail stock side of the platter. The bottom of the platter is completely finished from start to finish and a recess is cut to fit the expanding jaws of my Nova chuck. I mount the platter on the Nova chuck, bring the live center with the wooden mandrel up and start to work on the inside of the platter. The wood blanks that Karson sent me were just over 1 inch thick and the maple burl was very dry and did I mention as hard as a rock. Once I get the basic shape of the inside of the platter turned I remove the tail stock and finish the platter completely. I was able to start with 220 grit sandpaper on both of these platters and work all the way up to 400 grit. The platter I am going to keep started out looking like this before I turned it:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Not sure if you can see the measurement but this platter is 16 inches x 15 inches

The wood blank that Karson selected for a platter started out looking like this:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Karson's platter is 17 inches x 15 inches. As an added bonus Karson sent me a pet with his wood blank - as I was turning it I found a live wood bore larva- this little sucker had burrowed it's way 1/2" inch deep into the blank and made the trip from Delaware to Tennessee alive and well. I bet I scared the poor little fellow to death when the blank began spinning at 3200 rpm. His platter had one side of bark and three sides that were square cut. I rounded off one side, kept the bark side and left the two sides square cut as I wanted to keep as much of the original blank size as possible.

I turn the platters at the highest speed my lathe will go - 3200 rpm. By turning the blank at high speed the tool spends less time turning "air". I place a piece of black poster board on the lathe bed and have a piece of white poster board hanging behind the blank. This allows me to see the ghost shadow as I am turning. I make sure that the tools are sharp and take my time making long sweeping passes to prevent catches. An odd shaped piece spinning at 3200 rpm can make your heart race if you screw up. I am using Watco clear Danish oil as the first coat of finish on both pieces. I was able to put two coats of Danish oil on one piece today. The way I apply the Danish oil is to flood the piece completely until no more oil soaks in. On the first piece I used just over a pint of finish to soak both sides and had very little to wipe off after it sat for 30 minutes. I will let this piece sit for 4 days and then apply several coats of Satin wipe on poly. Tomorrow I will do the same Danish oil process on Karson's piece. I will get photos of what the pieces look like with the Danish oil before the wipe on poly is applied.
 

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Ready to finish

I had told Karson that I probably wouldn't be able to start on his wood gloat platter until after the 4th of July holiday, but the wood blanks he sent me have been asking to be put on the lathe ever since they arrived in Tennessee. Today I went to the shop and got an early start on turning two platters. I start all my platters the same way - decided what the shape will be, find an approximate center, drill a 3/8" diameter hole and mount to a screw chuck. What will be the inside of the platter is mounted on the screw chuck. I use a home made wooden mandrel that is mounted on a live center to put pressure on the tail stock side of the platter. The bottom of the platter is completely finished from start to finish and a recess is cut to fit the expanding jaws of my Nova chuck. I mount the platter on the Nova chuck, bring the live center with the wooden mandrel up and start to work on the inside of the platter. The wood blanks that Karson sent me were just over 1 inch thick and the maple burl was very dry and did I mention as hard as a rock. Once I get the basic shape of the inside of the platter turned I remove the tail stock and finish the platter completely. I was able to start with 220 grit sandpaper on both of these platters and work all the way up to 400 grit. The platter I am going to keep started out looking like this before I turned it:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Not sure if you can see the measurement but this platter is 16 inches x 15 inches

The wood blank that Karson selected for a platter started out looking like this:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Karson's platter is 17 inches x 15 inches. As an added bonus Karson sent me a pet with his wood blank - as I was turning it I found a live wood bore larva- this little sucker had burrowed it's way 1/2" inch deep into the blank and made the trip from Delaware to Tennessee alive and well. I bet I scared the poor little fellow to death when the blank began spinning at 3200 rpm. His platter had one side of bark and three sides that were square cut. I rounded off one side, kept the bark side and left the two sides square cut as I wanted to keep as much of the original blank size as possible.

I turn the platters at the highest speed my lathe will go - 3200 rpm. By turning the blank at high speed the tool spends less time turning "air". I place a piece of black poster board on the lathe bed and have a piece of white poster board hanging behind the blank. This allows me to see the ghost shadow as I am turning. I make sure that the tools are sharp and take my time making long sweeping passes to prevent catches. An odd shaped piece spinning at 3200 rpm can make your heart race if you screw up. I am using Watco clear Danish oil as the first coat of finish on both pieces. I was able to put two coats of Danish oil on one piece today. The way I apply the Danish oil is to flood the piece completely until no more oil soaks in. On the first piece I used just over a pint of finish to soak both sides and had very little to wipe off after it sat for 30 minutes. I will let this piece sit for 4 days and then apply several coats of Satin wipe on poly. Tomorrow I will do the same Danish oil process on Karson's piece. I will get photos of what the pieces look like with the Danish oil before the wipe on poly is applied.
WOW…...nice looking blanks and great looking platters. Can't wait to see them finished.
 

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Ready to finish

I had told Karson that I probably wouldn't be able to start on his wood gloat platter until after the 4th of July holiday, but the wood blanks he sent me have been asking to be put on the lathe ever since they arrived in Tennessee. Today I went to the shop and got an early start on turning two platters. I start all my platters the same way - decided what the shape will be, find an approximate center, drill a 3/8" diameter hole and mount to a screw chuck. What will be the inside of the platter is mounted on the screw chuck. I use a home made wooden mandrel that is mounted on a live center to put pressure on the tail stock side of the platter. The bottom of the platter is completely finished from start to finish and a recess is cut to fit the expanding jaws of my Nova chuck. I mount the platter on the Nova chuck, bring the live center with the wooden mandrel up and start to work on the inside of the platter. The wood blanks that Karson sent me were just over 1 inch thick and the maple burl was very dry and did I mention as hard as a rock. Once I get the basic shape of the inside of the platter turned I remove the tail stock and finish the platter completely. I was able to start with 220 grit sandpaper on both of these platters and work all the way up to 400 grit. The platter I am going to keep started out looking like this before I turned it:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Not sure if you can see the measurement but this platter is 16 inches x 15 inches

The wood blank that Karson selected for a platter started out looking like this:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Karson's platter is 17 inches x 15 inches. As an added bonus Karson sent me a pet with his wood blank - as I was turning it I found a live wood bore larva- this little sucker had burrowed it's way 1/2" inch deep into the blank and made the trip from Delaware to Tennessee alive and well. I bet I scared the poor little fellow to death when the blank began spinning at 3200 rpm. His platter had one side of bark and three sides that were square cut. I rounded off one side, kept the bark side and left the two sides square cut as I wanted to keep as much of the original blank size as possible.

I turn the platters at the highest speed my lathe will go - 3200 rpm. By turning the blank at high speed the tool spends less time turning "air". I place a piece of black poster board on the lathe bed and have a piece of white poster board hanging behind the blank. This allows me to see the ghost shadow as I am turning. I make sure that the tools are sharp and take my time making long sweeping passes to prevent catches. An odd shaped piece spinning at 3200 rpm can make your heart race if you screw up. I am using Watco clear Danish oil as the first coat of finish on both pieces. I was able to put two coats of Danish oil on one piece today. The way I apply the Danish oil is to flood the piece completely until no more oil soaks in. On the first piece I used just over a pint of finish to soak both sides and had very little to wipe off after it sat for 30 minutes. I will let this piece sit for 4 days and then apply several coats of Satin wipe on poly. Tomorrow I will do the same Danish oil process on Karson's piece. I will get photos of what the pieces look like with the Danish oil before the wipe on poly is applied.
Looking great Jeff. I can't wait to see the finished product. You can keep the pet. (I guess I forgot to tell you that as part of the bargin).

What should I look for in the rest of my wood. I'm guessing a powder post beetle. I better spray all of the blanks.
 

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Ready to finish

I had told Karson that I probably wouldn't be able to start on his wood gloat platter until after the 4th of July holiday, but the wood blanks he sent me have been asking to be put on the lathe ever since they arrived in Tennessee. Today I went to the shop and got an early start on turning two platters. I start all my platters the same way - decided what the shape will be, find an approximate center, drill a 3/8" diameter hole and mount to a screw chuck. What will be the inside of the platter is mounted on the screw chuck. I use a home made wooden mandrel that is mounted on a live center to put pressure on the tail stock side of the platter. The bottom of the platter is completely finished from start to finish and a recess is cut to fit the expanding jaws of my Nova chuck. I mount the platter on the Nova chuck, bring the live center with the wooden mandrel up and start to work on the inside of the platter. The wood blanks that Karson sent me were just over 1 inch thick and the maple burl was very dry and did I mention as hard as a rock. Once I get the basic shape of the inside of the platter turned I remove the tail stock and finish the platter completely. I was able to start with 220 grit sandpaper on both of these platters and work all the way up to 400 grit. The platter I am going to keep started out looking like this before I turned it:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Not sure if you can see the measurement but this platter is 16 inches x 15 inches

The wood blank that Karson selected for a platter started out looking like this:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Karson's platter is 17 inches x 15 inches. As an added bonus Karson sent me a pet with his wood blank - as I was turning it I found a live wood bore larva- this little sucker had burrowed it's way 1/2" inch deep into the blank and made the trip from Delaware to Tennessee alive and well. I bet I scared the poor little fellow to death when the blank began spinning at 3200 rpm. His platter had one side of bark and three sides that were square cut. I rounded off one side, kept the bark side and left the two sides square cut as I wanted to keep as much of the original blank size as possible.

I turn the platters at the highest speed my lathe will go - 3200 rpm. By turning the blank at high speed the tool spends less time turning "air". I place a piece of black poster board on the lathe bed and have a piece of white poster board hanging behind the blank. This allows me to see the ghost shadow as I am turning. I make sure that the tools are sharp and take my time making long sweeping passes to prevent catches. An odd shaped piece spinning at 3200 rpm can make your heart race if you screw up. I am using Watco clear Danish oil as the first coat of finish on both pieces. I was able to put two coats of Danish oil on one piece today. The way I apply the Danish oil is to flood the piece completely until no more oil soaks in. On the first piece I used just over a pint of finish to soak both sides and had very little to wipe off after it sat for 30 minutes. I will let this piece sit for 4 days and then apply several coats of Satin wipe on poly. Tomorrow I will do the same Danish oil process on Karson's piece. I will get photos of what the pieces look like with the Danish oil before the wipe on poly is applied.
Nice blog. Too bad you're using such a tiny piece of wood }:)~ . I look forward to seeing more of the process.
 

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Ready to finish

I had told Karson that I probably wouldn't be able to start on his wood gloat platter until after the 4th of July holiday, but the wood blanks he sent me have been asking to be put on the lathe ever since they arrived in Tennessee. Today I went to the shop and got an early start on turning two platters. I start all my platters the same way - decided what the shape will be, find an approximate center, drill a 3/8" diameter hole and mount to a screw chuck. What will be the inside of the platter is mounted on the screw chuck. I use a home made wooden mandrel that is mounted on a live center to put pressure on the tail stock side of the platter. The bottom of the platter is completely finished from start to finish and a recess is cut to fit the expanding jaws of my Nova chuck. I mount the platter on the Nova chuck, bring the live center with the wooden mandrel up and start to work on the inside of the platter. The wood blanks that Karson sent me were just over 1 inch thick and the maple burl was very dry and did I mention as hard as a rock. Once I get the basic shape of the inside of the platter turned I remove the tail stock and finish the platter completely. I was able to start with 220 grit sandpaper on both of these platters and work all the way up to 400 grit. The platter I am going to keep started out looking like this before I turned it:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Not sure if you can see the measurement but this platter is 16 inches x 15 inches

The wood blank that Karson selected for a platter started out looking like this:



This is what it looks like completely turned and ready to sand:





Karson's platter is 17 inches x 15 inches. As an added bonus Karson sent me a pet with his wood blank - as I was turning it I found a live wood bore larva- this little sucker had burrowed it's way 1/2" inch deep into the blank and made the trip from Delaware to Tennessee alive and well. I bet I scared the poor little fellow to death when the blank began spinning at 3200 rpm. His platter had one side of bark and three sides that were square cut. I rounded off one side, kept the bark side and left the two sides square cut as I wanted to keep as much of the original blank size as possible.

I turn the platters at the highest speed my lathe will go - 3200 rpm. By turning the blank at high speed the tool spends less time turning "air". I place a piece of black poster board on the lathe bed and have a piece of white poster board hanging behind the blank. This allows me to see the ghost shadow as I am turning. I make sure that the tools are sharp and take my time making long sweeping passes to prevent catches. An odd shaped piece spinning at 3200 rpm can make your heart race if you screw up. I am using Watco clear Danish oil as the first coat of finish on both pieces. I was able to put two coats of Danish oil on one piece today. The way I apply the Danish oil is to flood the piece completely until no more oil soaks in. On the first piece I used just over a pint of finish to soak both sides and had very little to wipe off after it sat for 30 minutes. I will let this piece sit for 4 days and then apply several coats of Satin wipe on poly. Tomorrow I will do the same Danish oil process on Karson's piece. I will get photos of what the pieces look like with the Danish oil before the wipe on poly is applied.
What a great looking piece of wood. Can't wait to see it finished.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ready for wipe on poly

I have flooded Karsons maple burl wood gloat platter with clear Danish oil and let it sit for 4 days to completely dry. This piece soaked up a little more than 1 pint of Danish oil. Here is what the piece looked like before the Danish oil was applied:





Here is the platter after the Danish oil was applied and left to dry for 4 days. There are a lot of wild grain patterns in this piece and the Danish oil gave them some character. I will start applying satin wipe on poly today and will build up the finish over the next several days. The second platter needs another day of dry time before it will be ready for it's first coat of poly.

 

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Ready for wipe on poly

I have flooded Karsons maple burl wood gloat platter with clear Danish oil and let it sit for 4 days to completely dry. This piece soaked up a little more than 1 pint of Danish oil. Here is what the piece looked like before the Danish oil was applied:





Here is the platter after the Danish oil was applied and left to dry for 4 days. There are a lot of wild grain patterns in this piece and the Danish oil gave them some character. I will start applying satin wipe on poly today and will build up the finish over the next several days. The second platter needs another day of dry time before it will be ready for it's first coat of poly.

I'm envious that Karson hasn't shared any of that wood with me..LOL

Looking really good. The oil really did bring out the grain.
 

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Ready for wipe on poly

I have flooded Karsons maple burl wood gloat platter with clear Danish oil and let it sit for 4 days to completely dry. This piece soaked up a little more than 1 pint of Danish oil. Here is what the piece looked like before the Danish oil was applied:





Here is the platter after the Danish oil was applied and left to dry for 4 days. There are a lot of wild grain patterns in this piece and the Danish oil gave them some character. I will start applying satin wipe on poly today and will build up the finish over the next several days. The second platter needs another day of dry time before it will be ready for it's first coat of poly.

Now that is some awsome looking grain. can't wait to see more
 

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Ready for wipe on poly

I have flooded Karsons maple burl wood gloat platter with clear Danish oil and let it sit for 4 days to completely dry. This piece soaked up a little more than 1 pint of Danish oil. Here is what the piece looked like before the Danish oil was applied:





Here is the platter after the Danish oil was applied and left to dry for 4 days. There are a lot of wild grain patterns in this piece and the Danish oil gave them some character. I will start applying satin wipe on poly today and will build up the finish over the next several days. The second platter needs another day of dry time before it will be ready for it's first coat of poly.

Hey, it's shaped like a Boogie Board. Is Karson going body surfing?
 

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Registered
Joined
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2,743 Posts
Ready for wipe on poly

I have flooded Karsons maple burl wood gloat platter with clear Danish oil and let it sit for 4 days to completely dry. This piece soaked up a little more than 1 pint of Danish oil. Here is what the piece looked like before the Danish oil was applied:





Here is the platter after the Danish oil was applied and left to dry for 4 days. There are a lot of wild grain patterns in this piece and the Danish oil gave them some character. I will start applying satin wipe on poly today and will build up the finish over the next several days. The second platter needs another day of dry time before it will be ready for it's first coat of poly.

Hopefully you will share photos of the piece after it is completely finished. This piece is Beautiful!

The Sedcokid
 
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