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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Bill, You and Kenny just saved me about 20 bucks toward my next spindle gouge order. Time to crank up the grinder.
I already owe Dick Cain for saving me from purchasing a dovetail recess scraper by showing me how to make my own from a old dull file. Back when I thought I had to spend something from every paycheck on woodworking tools I might have been sore about not getting to fork-over the dough. I'm so over that spending addiction now (with gas at $3.19/gal I hold onto those bills until the eagle screams).
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Sometimes its really good to be reminded of where we're at in the learning continuum :). Thanks for the good idea; when I get a lathe someday, I'll try to remember. I've got way more regular screwdrivers than I ever use anyway!
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
That's a good lesson to learn Bill. I know I've been schooled a few times in that way. It makes you take a step back, but can also push you forward. Good story.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Nice story Bill. Too often we get into the unending tool chase thinking that our success/failure lies in the tool, itself and forget that experience is the real secret to success.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
So true Bill. Been there done that. Great story. There is nothing like an equaliser is there.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
I think we all know the feeling, Bill. Every time I start to feel too good about my skills, someone posts a project that makes mine look like beginner shop class. <g>
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Ah, humility. You live long enough you get used to it.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
great story!

Also nice to be reminded that we may already have more tools than we thought we had.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Bill How can you call him a friend. I mean he screwed up a good screwdriver.

Or did he go and get one of his own.

Great story.

Now in my shop he could find a screwdriver, but, he'd have a hard time finding the grinder.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
lessons learned are the only way we can strive to become better
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Now, Karson - I let him screw up one of my screwdrivers, and now I have a new turning tool and know that I don't know jack about woodworking yet.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
It does pay to keep an open mind, and never quit learning, or being willing to learn.
 

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A lesson in humility...

Saw a blog earlier by DannyBoy about lathes brought back memories. Many years ago I got my first lathe - one of those cheap ones from Ohio Forge. I practiced and practiced until I finally got a spindle that looked decent. My next door neighbor - who is a carpenter - was out in the yard and I called him over to see my handy work. I was just so thrilled to show him something that I could do with wood that HE couldn't do. Kenny is a really good finished carpenter, and I had been in his shop many times and knew that he did not have a lathe.

Well, he looked at my spindle and said that it was pretty fair for a beginner. I challenged him to come over and do one better on my lathe. Unfortunately he accepted and came over (now keep in mind that this was all being done in a friendly manner - we were and still are very good friends). Well Kenny came over and asked what tool I had used to do my spindle. I proudly handed him my cheap Sears Craftsman gouge and said "let's see what you can do". He put the gouge down, looked around and grabbed one of my screwdrivers - walked over to the grinder and sharpened it a bit and proceeded to blow my spindle making dreams totally away - his spindle was much nicer than mine AND WITH JUST A SCREWDRIVER!!!!!.

He went on to explain that he had spent his childhood years in his Father's shop in Mississippi - and all he did all day long was turn spindles for the rocking chairs that his father made to sell.

Just a humbling experience that taught me to never take for granted what another's talent or knowledge might be. I went on to learn a lot from Kenny and he turned out to be quite a talented furniture maker. Wish he still lived next door.
Methinks you were hustled. Just make sure you don't play poker or pool with him either… :)
 
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