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I've been wanting to get into woodworking for sometime, but I was holding off on getting a table saw until I came across the right deal. Well yesterday, I ran across a Craigslist add for a, brand new, Bosch 4100-09 for $400. I did a quick search and saw that I would be saving $200, so I bought it.

I've been lurking on here for a while now and I know that a lot of people recommend a cabinet saw, but I got the Bosch. I was wondering if anyone had any recommendations for add on's to this saw. I was thinking about a new miter gauge.
 

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Why don't you just actually use the thing and then figure out what you might want/need? Everyone is different and use their tools for different purposes.. you need to figure out what you want to use it for, see what feels comfortable and what you might want to make things work better for you. Not everyone needs a particular gadget or gizmo.. you need to determine that. About the only universal is a push stick.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Get a decent blade. Maybe a diablo combo from ye olde bigge boxxe store.

Get ye some wood. Doe some cutting.

WAIT YOUUL CUT YOUR HAND OFF LIKE THAT WHAT ARE YOU THINKING

Okay… Read up on safety. Make a crosscut sled. Read up on safety. Practice technique. (Assuming here that you haven't had much experience on the table saw. Forgive me if I'm wrong)

But anyhoo…. Read up on safety, and keep your hands away from the blade, and your body out of alignment with the blade.
 

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Push sticks and eye protection and hearing protection. But first set up the saw. Make sure the fence is parallel or slightly open to the blade (a couple thousand over). Kick backs are dangerous. Make sure the splitter and blade guard work well and don't bind the wood. Read up on table saw technique. Set up the miter gauge for 90 degree cross cuts. Have fun but be safe.
 

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Find the manual and read it cover to cover…repeat. Adjust the saw as outlined and do test cutting to become familiar with the saw. Then decide what you want to build, what you can afford, and what you need. But as said, get a good blade. It will be money well spent to buy a good Freud or other mid price level blade. You don't need top of the line now, but you will learn by reading reviews and on line articles and woodworking books. Also, you can learn a lot from right here. But, make safety your #1 priority. If you start to do something and it feels dangerous, then it probably is. Eye and ear protection and push sticks etc are priorities. Have fun.
 

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I concur with Brad. You bought it, use the thing. Build something or try to and screw up a lot and often. Start with a small box, a shelf for the shop nothing to difficult. Then your off and running. You got ideas, your only limited by your imagination. Go forth and conquer!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the feedback. I will definitely be getting be getting a new blade. I was in Lowes earlier, but the only blades I saw were DeWalt. I was looking for the Diablo because I have heard good things about them.
 

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I have a bosch saw and it's served me well. The first thing I'd suggest buying is a good book explaining table saws and safety. There is no room for error when it comes to a table saw. Then get what you need to cut safely. Then start using it. This is not one of those 'just plug it in and give it a go' things.

Good luck. You'll find lots of good advice and inspiration here.
 

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I just got a pair of Grippers and sharp blades are important, watch a few table saw safety vids on youtube don't do anything stupid, learn when to use a fence vs miter gauge, never freehand cut anything.
 

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You definitely want a tool that will allow you to set up the saw, blade, and fence as accurately as possible.

Here is what I use. There are other designs but this one is fool proof. Others have problems with fitting the miter slot.

It can be found here.

A right angle gauge will help you insure the fence is perpendicular to the table top and the tool below will make sure the fence and the blade are parallel to one another.

The only other tool I find really helpful is a Wixey Digital Angle gauge to check the fence and the blade for perpendicular, and any other angle you need to set for the blade.

As others have suggested, a good combination blade is a good investment. I use a Freud Premier Fusion blade. Great blade for the price with excellent performance.

A zero clearance insert plate with a micro jig splitter is a good safety item, if your saw does not have a riving knife.



 

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For add-on's, the first thing I'd have, before a sled or anything, is a stack of push SHOES.

I would make them capable of running past the splitter, so some would be 3/4" thick, some 3/8" or 1/4" and a few 1/8".

As well, the heels would be different depths so they'd just skim over the surface of different thicknesses of materials. This allows you to run the push shoe through the blade and still push narrow pieces through, if need be.

These are your best friends for safety. They should be tall enough you'd have no qualms about running them through the blade and keeping your hand away from it.

Add good blades, insuring the blade and fence are parallel to the miter guides (a tri-square can do this) and using the/a splitter and you should still have all ten forty years from now (kick backs will be minimal).

Now days, I rely on my cabinet saw. I sold my Bosch because I retired and don't do site work anymore, but it was a damn good saw (sold it for $400.00, but it was the non-riving knife type). It gave me good cuts and the fence was good enough for most cuts. When I needed precision, I set it with this:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/65954

If you make one, it will set any saw up as good as the dial versions do (you can set it so you cannot get a 1/1000 feeler gauge between it and the blade or fence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You definitely want a tool that will allow you to set up the saw, blade, and fence as accurately as possible.

Here is what I use. There are other designs but this one is fool proof. Others have problems with fitting the miter slot.

It can be found here.

A right angle gauge will help you insure the fence is perpendicular to the table top and the tool below will make sure the fence and the blade are parallel to one another.

The only other tool I find really helpful is a Wixey Digital Angle gauge to check the fence and the blade for perpendicular, and any other angle you need to set for the blade.

As others have suggested, a good combination blade is a good investment. I use a Freud Premier Fusion blade. Great blade for the price with excellent performance.

A zero clearance insert plate with a micro jig splitter is a good safety item, if your saw does not have a riving knife.

- timbertailor
Thanks! I will look into getting this, I was actually wondering if the made a tool just for that.
 

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Ditto what Brad said… Specifically get the Wixey

Also handy for making the sled and working with your miter gauge is an office Depot drafting triangle 45 degrees.

For Miter Guage - - there is a guy selling an Incra on the 'woodworking trade and swap' section. I think the heading is tools and DVD's or something like that.
http://lumberjocks.com/topics/79977

Check it out.
Congrats on the new toy.
 

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I'll repeat the suggestion about building a cross cut sled. William Ng has a good Youtube video on making one but there are others too. The sled makes it much safer to make certain cuts and it has greatly improved the accuracy of my 90 degree cross cuts. There are things I would never attempt without one. The cross cut sled is probably my most used table saw accessory and an important safety device.

The Wixey angle gauge is my second most used accessory. I use it not only to set the blade angle but you can also use it to set the angle of the miter gauge. You simply put the face of the miter gauge on the edge of a table, use the table to zero out the Wixey and then put the Wixey on the miter gauge's bar to set the desired angle or to check that the presets are accurate.

Also, make sure that you understand how kickback can occur. I had a couple of nasty kickbacks before I really understood this. Fortunately no one got hurt but I have a hole in my wall where a piece of wood embedded in it. When it happens, it happens fast.

Don't forget safety glasses or goggles, hearing protection and push sticks.
 

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Read the manual and believe the manual. Lots of people suggest you get the out feed and side expensions. i never got those but built a table behind it.

If you dont plan to move it room to room i would build a stand for it. i got the stand that bosch has but dont like it because there isnt storage under it. i built one with 2×4's and then put my sleds under the saw.

I got the dust bag that bosch sells which helps for stuff exiting the saw there but it isnt great. lots of dust goes below the saw so i just started with a piece of card board and some packing tape. then i would clean it out after every long cut. I tried a shop vac too but it only helped a little.
 
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