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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
Cheese Platter

This project was a revisit of a failure I had last year. Yeah I know, it took me this long to revisit the project? Well yes. Recently a local woodturner's club suggested a challenge for the month of May to turn a platter without a worm screw, face plate or glue block and it rekindled that failure from last year.

I grabbed a piece of Jatoba and gave it another try. I had a feeling the jatoba was going to be a nice hard wood, but I had no idea just how beautiful the wood really is. It has a golden shine when the lust of the natural wood is exposed and looks even better with a proper finish is applied.

I got the piece round, between centers and cut in a tenon. It was less than ¼ inch tenon and only needed to expose enough wood to allow the chuck to grab hold. After flipping the wood into the chuck, I turned the bottom of the plate and made a recessed mortar. Finished off the bottom with a sanding from 80 to 600 grit. Butchers block oil finish and Mahoney's wax as a topper.

Flipped the bottom into the chuck and worked the top of the plate. Making it flat, sanding from 80 to 600 and finishing the same, with butcher's block and wax topper completing the project. 100% food safe and ready for a block of cheese, crackers and maybe some pepperoni.

This was a fun project and I recommend it, especially with the picnic weather approaching.

Here's this weeks video: Cheese Platter
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Nutcracker

This project was a challenge and a joy to turn. I used Cherry and Cedar to make the bowl wide enough. Then it was just a matter of making the post for the brass nutcracker wheel and hollowing the bowl to hold a bunch of nuts.

The main body of the bowl is made of cherry planking. This was long enough but needed more width. So I took a short but thick board of cedar and glued it to either side, after cutting it in half. Now it was as wide as it was long.

I used a worm screw, since I was going to have a "post" for the nutcracker to rest in, a face plate would have left little holes. The hole for the worm screw was too small for the base of the nutcracker and needed a forstner bit to widen it, when the time came.

I think this project turned out great, even if it made me a little nuts. I had a hard time talking and describing this item in the video. Is it a shallow bowl? Is it a deep platter? It's not a nutcracker, that's the brass part. I settled on a nutcracker display platter bowl.

From the mixed bag of nuts, I found that pecans are my favorite. Which is your favorite nut?

This week's video: Nutcracker
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
No chuck, faceplate, glue block or worm screw... make a plate on a lathe

Was asked if I could turn a plate between centers without a chuck, glue block, faceplate or worm screw. I thought about it for awhile an decided on a possible solution. I put it to the test and here is what I came up with.

Take a board, cut if round on the band saw. Drill a depression with a forstner bit lager then the width of the spur and attached the live center, bring the tail stock up to lock the wood tween centers. turn the outside edge to round. Move the tool rest to the inside between the wood and the live center side, get your initial flat surface confirmed, in case of wobble. Then carve from the forstner bit edge to the out rim making a concaved center.

Once the forstner bit depression is smoothed out and matching the concave wood, time to work the top of the plate. Move the too rest around and flatten off the top (could put a rim or concaved side here too). The issue you face at this point is your tail stock connection. A cone will allow you to get in closer and leave a small post or if you have a wide center, just means more work later.

Sand the wood except the centers and remove from the lathe. The tail stock will have a raised post area that will need to be removed. There are a few ways to accomplish this, but if nothing else simply sand it away to match the depth of the rest of the plate.

Here is a video on how I did my example: No chuck, face plate, glue block or worm screw

EDIT: I highly recommend NOT attempting this.

The risks are not worth the reward.

This is just a proof of concept and cannot be stressed enough, for the minimal amount of money a faceplate, glue block or chuck is the best approach.
 

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No chuck, faceplate, glue block or worm screw... make a plate on a lathe

Was asked if I could turn a plate between centers without a chuck, glue block, faceplate or worm screw. I thought about it for awhile an decided on a possible solution. I put it to the test and here is what I came up with.

Take a board, cut if round on the band saw. Drill a depression with a forstner bit lager then the width of the spur and attached the live center, bring the tail stock up to lock the wood tween centers. turn the outside edge to round. Move the tool rest to the inside between the wood and the live center side, get your initial flat surface confirmed, in case of wobble. Then carve from the forstner bit edge to the out rim making a concaved center.

Once the forstner bit depression is smoothed out and matching the concave wood, time to work the top of the plate. Move the too rest around and flatten off the top (could put a rim or concaved side here too). The issue you face at this point is your tail stock connection. A cone will allow you to get in closer and leave a small post or if you have a wide center, just means more work later.

Sand the wood except the centers and remove from the lathe. The tail stock will have a raised post area that will need to be removed. There are a few ways to accomplish this, but if nothing else simply sand it away to match the depth of the rest of the plate.

Here is a video on how I did my example: No chuck, face plate, glue block or worm screw

EDIT: I highly recommend NOT attempting this.

The risks are not worth the reward.

This is just a proof of concept and cannot be stressed enough, for the minimal amount of money a faceplate, glue block or chuck is the best approach.
Working the backside of the plate from the spur center to edge would be difficult on many lathes. Since many lathes come with a simple faceplate (including the Harbor Freight ones), I see no nobility in this challenge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
No chuck, faceplate, glue block or worm screw... make a plate on a lathe

Was asked if I could turn a plate between centers without a chuck, glue block, faceplate or worm screw. I thought about it for awhile an decided on a possible solution. I put it to the test and here is what I came up with.

Take a board, cut if round on the band saw. Drill a depression with a forstner bit lager then the width of the spur and attached the live center, bring the tail stock up to lock the wood tween centers. turn the outside edge to round. Move the tool rest to the inside between the wood and the live center side, get your initial flat surface confirmed, in case of wobble. Then carve from the forstner bit edge to the out rim making a concaved center.

Once the forstner bit depression is smoothed out and matching the concave wood, time to work the top of the plate. Move the too rest around and flatten off the top (could put a rim or concaved side here too). The issue you face at this point is your tail stock connection. A cone will allow you to get in closer and leave a small post or if you have a wide center, just means more work later.

Sand the wood except the centers and remove from the lathe. The tail stock will have a raised post area that will need to be removed. There are a few ways to accomplish this, but if nothing else simply sand it away to match the depth of the rest of the plate.

Here is a video on how I did my example: No chuck, face plate, glue block or worm screw

EDIT: I highly recommend NOT attempting this.

The risks are not worth the reward.

This is just a proof of concept and cannot be stressed enough, for the minimal amount of money a faceplate, glue block or chuck is the best approach.
Working the backside of the plate from the spur center to edge would be difficult on many lathes. Since many lathes come with a simple faceplate (including the Harbor Freight ones), I see no nobility in this challenge.

- Phil32
I agree completely.

I have no idea why anyone would want to do this. And I highly recommend it NOT be attempted. I wrote about this in the description of the video, but didn't mention it here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
Potpourri Pot

This project was a down and dirty quick show case of the lathe and turning. I had a friend over and wanted to see a project completed. I thought a potpourri bowl was a quick introduction to woodturning.

I picked up a piece of 5×4 bowl blank ribbon sapele for this project. After getting it round on the lathe, it exposed some very pretty grain. My friend and I discussed the various spaces and came to the conclusion, anything designer would take away from the beautiful grain. So straight sides it was, to showcase the woods greatest features.

Ribbon sapele has never let me down and this piece was no different. From top to bottom the wood turned great and the shine of the natural luster was fantastic. Adding the O.B. Shine Juice was just a capper to the wood.

I could have taken more time and hollowed out the inside, but I thought I would try something different. I used a forstner bit to create a large cavity for the potpourri to reside. This allowed me to finish the project quicker and allow my friend to see the finial piece sooner.

However, I cut the top for the lid a little to short or small. I thought I was finished, but had to re-chuck the bowl and make the opening a touch bigger. Didn't take long and the lid fit perfectly. I guess that's the price you pay for going quick.

Here's this weeks video: Sapele Potpourri Pot

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
Jewelry Box

This was a request from a friend asking if I could make a jewelry box. The wood was selected, a brief design was sketched, and work completed. I appreciated the challenge and experience taking an outside source design and attempt to match it.

Ribbon Sapele is a beautiful wood and I believe no matter what the project is, it will turn out great. Maple is a fantastic wood to work with, but there is a risk of soft spots. The Black Walnut is a favorite wood to work with, since its fairly soft hardwood and really shines.

I had a build issue, as the top ended up rather large. I was able to remount it and cut the diameter down. I wanted to dish out the top, but became concerned with accidentally popping through and making a funnel.

Here's this weeks video: Jewelry Box

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
Patagonian Rosewood

This project was to make a simple individual's salad bowl and use Ack's Wood Paste for the first time. Ack's donated a starter kit to me, after watching my video on turning wig stands I donated to a local breast cancer clinic. So I put it to the test.

The wood for this project is Curupay, also known as Patagonian Rosewood. It is a very hardwood and displays some wonderful grain structure. There were a few blemishes in the wood, which I think make it even more unique.

I was going to turn a basic bowl, half ball if you will, but as I turned it I felt it needed more character and added a pedestal. I think this turned out great and the Ack's being 100% food safe makes this bowl perfect for a salad or any other food product.

The Ack's Wood Paste is such a wonderful finish, I want to save it for food projects and make it last as long as I can. I still have plenty of O.B. Shine Juice for non-food projects. In the future I might be an exclusive Ack's user.

Anyway, if you haven't tried Ack's Wood Paste, you should give them a try. You will not be disappointed.

Here's this weeks video: Patagonian Rosewood
 

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Patagonian Rosewood

This project was to make a simple individual's salad bowl and use Ack's Wood Paste for the first time. Ack's donated a starter kit to me, after watching my video on turning wig stands I donated to a local breast cancer clinic. So I put it to the test.

The wood for this project is Curupay, also known as Patagonian Rosewood. It is a very hardwood and displays some wonderful grain structure. There were a few blemishes in the wood, which I think make it even more unique.

I was going to turn a basic bowl, half ball if you will, but as I turned it I felt it needed more character and added a pedestal. I think this turned out great and the Ack's being 100% food safe makes this bowl perfect for a salad or any other food product.

The Ack's Wood Paste is such a wonderful finish, I want to save it for food projects and make it last as long as I can. I still have plenty of O.B. Shine Juice for non-food projects. In the future I might be an exclusive Ack's user.

Anyway, if you haven't tried Ack's Wood Paste, you should give them a try. You will not be disappointed.

Here's this weeks video: Patagonian Rosewood
Cool video and project! Well done!
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
Bug killer

This project was made from necessity, kind of. I found these tea light citronella candles that are used as a insect repellent and thought, "Yeah, I haven't turned a tea light holder in a while." Luckily, I recent came into some cocobolo in small form for this project.

I never worked with cocobolo before, but was warned that some people have serious reactions to the dust and oils. I took a little extra precaution for this project and… knock on wood (wives tail for good luck) I did not have a reaction of any kind.

This wood is very hard and cut nicely at times, but also didn't create shavings. The cutting seems to be fine and not ribbon like. That being said, it did not tear out either. I would say it was a weird hard wood, but still decent to work with.

The other odd thing I noticed about this wood is the oil. When I burned my logo on to the bottom, it smoked greater then any other wood before and the oils boiled to the surface. It was an interesting sight.

Otherwise, the wood is beautiful with purples, oranges, dark streaks and light streaks. I plan on putting this to use in the back yard on the deck. I still debating on whether or not I will leave out in the weather, to see how the finish and wood hold up. What do you think?

Here's this weeks video: Citronella tea light holder
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
Cigar Ashtray

This project was a duplicate or inspired by Huw's turn awhile back. He received a stainless-steel disc from Luie from Woodworking 220-7. Luie was kind enough to send me a few of these disc's so to the lathe I went to make an ashtray.

I had a perfect piece of Box Elder for this project and wasted no time getting on the lathe. I used a faceplate to get the bottom turned. I attempted to use the elf decorating tool, but failed. I'm sure it's my fault and not the tool or wood.

So as some sort of decoration I put a bead in the pedestal of the ashtray. Finished it with O.B. Shine Juice and flipped in the chuck to get the insides out. After carving out the center, I flattened off the bottom for the steel disc to sit in.

However, I forgot to include the groves to avoid the cigars from rolling. So I did a little hand filing and hand polishing. In the end it looked like a squatted rook from a chessboard.

Here's this weeks video: Cigar Ashtray
 

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Cigar Ashtray

This project was a duplicate or inspired by Huw's turn awhile back. He received a stainless-steel disc from Luie from Woodworking 220-7. Luie was kind enough to send me a few of these disc's so to the lathe I went to make an ashtray.

I had a perfect piece of Box Elder for this project and wasted no time getting on the lathe. I used a faceplate to get the bottom turned. I attempted to use the elf decorating tool, but failed. I'm sure it's my fault and not the tool or wood.

So as some sort of decoration I put a bead in the pedestal of the ashtray. Finished it with O.B. Shine Juice and flipped in the chuck to get the insides out. After carving out the center, I flattened off the bottom for the steel disc to sit in.

However, I forgot to include the groves to avoid the cigars from rolling. So I did a little hand filing and hand polishing. In the end it looked like a squatted rook from a chessboard.

Here's this weeks video: Cigar Ashtray
Cool project, thanks for the idea! Have to make one!
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
Display plate/dome

I picked up the 9-inch cake dome and managed to have just the right size wood for the project. I am pretty sure this is African Mahogany, but I could be wrong. The golden grain with amber shine, is what makes me think this is African Mahogany. That plus the fibrous strands on the rough cuts tends to point me that way too.

I decided I was going with the glue block for this project. Seemed like the easiest way to get the mortise established. I coved out the bottom and made the base as wide as possible, while giving it a little flare and design. The sides were smooth and very plain, so I dropped a couple of grooves to dress it up.

The top was raised by cutting the edge like a very large tenon, for the glass dome to secure against. The outer edge to the sides I rounded off slightly, whether anyone notices or not I think it adds to the piece.

Here's this weeks video: Display plate/dome
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
Candle Holder

This project really started with the wood. I saw the beautiful figure in the wood of the 4×4 and thought it would make a nice candle holder. So I set out to make it so.

I needed to find out about the size of candles I could use and the size of hurricane glass. I was lucky to find 3inch glass and 2 inch candles. I believed this combo would be good. Since the 4×4 would be cut down beyond 4 inches and I would want a lip or groove for a lip to rest the glass into.

Now that I had the components, it was a matter of shaping the wood. I had a basic image of the shape in my head and an old drawing as reference. As I turned the shape, the cuts and gouges revealed the figure.

In the end, I think this turned out great.

Here's this weeks video: Candle Holder
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
Gray Box Potpourri

This project turned into a wonderful surprise. I never heard of Gray Box before and this piece was not listed as a burl, so yay… big surprise. Beyond the burl, the wood cut beautifully, and the exposed grain was fantastic.

I started this project thinking I would embellish this bowl with coves, grooves and beads. After seeing the burl, I knew I had to change tactics and leave the natural look alone. I stopped cutting the pedestal and tried to make smooth lines or flat surfaces to showcase the grain.

I collected several wood pieces that are perfect for a potpourri pot and equally a good number of pewter lids. This will not be the last time I turn a potpourri pot, but the wood will be different.

Here's this weeks video: Gray Box Potpourri
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Dalmata

This project turned into a humble reminder that I am still new to turning. I seem to do well with the smaller projects, bigger works need more practice. I am ashamed to see such a beautiful piece of wood go to waste on my lathe.

Dalmata I found out is a rather hard wood and the size of it makes it worth a lot of coin. I really need to invest in one of those coring systems. Regardless, I believe the spalting was a sign that it was on the way of softening up. I got much more tear out then I would expect from a hardwood like this. Sanding sealer helped with that.

The design was a challenge. I was not getting a vibe or felling on what direction the wood was wanting to go. I flattened off the sides, after looking at putting a bead around the center for embellishment. I do feel the design looks more like a plant pot then a salad bowl.

The wood looks great I just did not do it justice. In fact, at one point I got lazy (or tired) and got a huge catch in the bowl. I filled it with millput and it actually looks good. However, there were other catches that I could not get rid of. I probably should have used millput for some of the other catches and it would have turned out much better.

Overall, I am happy that I tried and got more experience. I need more practice on larger turnings. Maybe something small for the next project to boost my confidence again.

Here's this weeks video: Dalmata Salad Bowl
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 ·
Shaving Kit Stand & Bowl

This project was really three projects in one. Brush handle, stand stem and bowl. The brush was made from Sipo. I used this wood when I first started turning and its beautiful. The chatoyance of the golden highlights with the dark brown background make it one of my favorite woods to work. I got a little carried away with the epoxy, securing the brush to the handle.

The Amboyna Burl is another new wood for me. It is absolutely stunning with its swirling grain and colors. The oranges, tans, dark browns and golds give the wood such character. The shapes in the twisted grain seem to go on forever. This wood compliments the stand very nicely and the little bit of sap wood help to tie it in with the cherry bowl.

Cherry is a very comfortable wood to word with. It has a simple and elegant looks about it and it polishes up very smoothly. The shine helps reflect the chatoyance in the side grain. The slight amount of sap wood almost matches the amboyna sap wood and hopefully you can see the connection as I do.

I am almost certain my brother will love this piece and will put it to good use.

Here's this weeks video: Shaving Kit Stand & Bowl
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
Peace Pot

This project was a gift request. I also like making these small bowls. The cherry wood is wonderful to work with and the shine you can achieve is great too. The pewter lid is one of the assortments that I got from Penn State Industries. They sell an assortment of 8 lids for under $30, so pretty inexpensive. This specific one looks like a peace dove.

Potpourri pots make great gifts and do not have to be used just for smelly stuff. The bowl/lids make a great miniature jewelry box, spare coin bin, etc.

Here's this weeks video: Peace Pot
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
Failure to Success

This candy dish project was a failed success! LOL

The wood I used to start this project was Black Palm. I don't know if you ever had a chance to work with it, but it's not easy. Obviously above my skill set. So I switched to another wood, again realized this new wood might be a problem I switched again. I ended up selecting Black Walnut.

I think I was a little off center with the worm screw and took a little more off the side then was originally planned. I say this because when I measured, I thought I had or would have "just enough" for a recessed lips for the glass lid to fit in. That was not to be the case in the end. I had to create a lip for the bowl to recess into the glass lid.

Black Walnut is such a pretty wood to work with. It cuts clean and the grain structure can be very mesmerizing. The chatoyance of the side grain produces a golden shine that is a great contrast to the dark wood.

It looks like a goblet without the lid, but is intended to be a candy dish. It could be a jewelry box too. Then again, I see no reason you couldn't put a drink it and cover it with the glass to keep the bugs out. I finished it with Acks wood paste, which is food safe, so yeah.

Here's this weeks video: Candy Dish
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
50,000 Year Old Wood

This project was a surprise. I purchased this wood because it had an exotic name. I had no idea that it could be as old as 50,000 years old. After reading the sticker on the wood when I got home, I felt like I was holding something ancient and maybe it should be left alone in its current state. Then I realized it was sold as a bowl blank, so let's go.

I don't normally do any research on the wood I'm turning until after I turned it. This time I felt compelled to find out more. Scientist (or someone a lot smarter than I) theorize that during the Ice Ages and great Tsunami slammed the northern part of New Zealand. This resulted in the knocking down and piling up of trees that eventually became submerged in a peat bog.

Why is a peat bog so important? A peat bog is wetland that has no running water feeding it. No underwater spring, flowing brooks or streams. The water in the bog is acidic, low in nutrients and low in oxygen. All of this combined, makes a great time capsule.

This piece of Kauri states on the sticker, from the company that sold it originally, that it was carbon dated to be 30,000 to 50,0000 years old. Of course, I went straight to the oldest part of the statement or title.

Just thinking about even 30,000 years old for a minute, taking the average generation span of (let us make the math easy) 20 years. That would mean the wood is over 1500 generations old. I cannot imagine further back beyond my great grandparents, so 3 generations. Looking back at the past astonishes me. How something so fragile as wood could be that old.

The wood itself cut very nicely. I felt like it was stronger than maple, but I am still new to turning. The shavings were smooth and consistent, with no tear out. The luster of the polished wood to 600 grit and finish made the piece sparkle as if it were infused with gold flakes.

Here's this weeks video: 50,000 Year Old Wood - Bowl
 
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