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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Tom -

Very cool! Thanks for sharing this.

David
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Great idea! I need one of these.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Blake, it takes 5 minutes to make. Go make one right now. LOL.
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
I made a similar version of this and it does work well.
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
A benchhook for small parts. Good one
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Another great jib. And so simple to make
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Great idea Tom!
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Great tip, Tom. I too, have often struggled to figure out a way to hold small pieces. Thanks!
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Thanks, Tom. I will be making one tomorrow or Monday! What a cool solution to a problem that plagues so many lumberjocks!

God Bless,
Hawg
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Amazing how simple it is to solve a perceived hard situation. Good tip, thanks for posting this one too Tom.
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Thank you Tom. I made one before breakfast today. It worked well AND used up a little more of that kelterment from under the bench!
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Another good hook to add to the collection! How thick did you make the fence/stop on yours?
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
You could use it as a shooting board, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Hi Dorje,

The overall width of the hook is 13". This was just a piece of scrap I had so I didn't cut it at all. the width of the stop is 2", again just a piece of scrap. The stop is 1/4" thick hardboard, glued to the MDF base. I wish I made this a few months ago. It took 5 minutes to make and works wonderfully.
 

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Jig for hand planing small parts.

As I continue on my journey to becoming more proficient at the use of hand planes and the like, I've had some serious headaches. One of the major headaches I've had is surface planing small parts. I've tried clamping and locking in the vise. I've tried bench dogs and other various means. I've not been able to consistently come up with a way to hold small parts.

The following is an idea I gleaned from a woodworking video by Rob Cosman. It's just a piece of MDF with a strip of 1/4" hardboard glued to it and a bench hook screwed to it. The hook keeps the planing jig from moving, and the 1/4" thick strip keeps the piece from sliding. It works brilliantly for it's intended purpose.





This worked so good I just thought I'd share it.

Cheers!
Looks like a good one Mot, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Dowel Stock Preparator!

I've been fiddling with wooden hinges, and can't get good dowel stock. Epecially dowel stock that matches the species of wood I'm working with. I gleaned this jig from another Rob Cosman video.

I took a 2" piece of walnut from the scrap pile. I drilled a 1/4" (0.247" actually) hole in it close to one face. I took a few passes through the drum sander to just show the hole cut. I chamfered one end to accept the workpiece stock. I clamped an old plane iron creating an awkward looking jig.





My first pass came out too thin. I clamped a playing card between the iron and the walnut. My second attempt came out at 0.247". Blind ass luck to get it that close, however, my intent was to go for that diameter, so 2nd attempt or 12th attempt, I was in for the long haul.

Here's the process of making the dowel:

I started by ripping a few 5/16" strips from the stock I'm using to make my box. Sorry Niki, I used the GRRipper. I don't think it's an accident waiting to happen. I use the GRRipper in conjunction with the MJ Splitter.



After I get a piece of oversized square stock, I chuck it up in my hand drill and use the belt sander to sharpen the end of it to go into the jig.



I wanted to knock off the edges to make more of an octagon to relieve stress on the jig. I could have done this on the tablesaw with the blade at 45, but this isn't a precision maneuver, so I just used the belt sander. Next time I'm going to use a small parts clamp I have to knock the edges off first, then sharpen the end. This way, I had to hold them with my fingers, risking a slight manicure while I was doing it. I might have used the GRRipper for this too, but would have just been to torment, Niki.



I chuck the stock up in the drill, and then head to the jig.



This is a picture of the stock part way through the jig.



When I get near the end of the stock, I reverse the drill, chuck up the other end, and pull it through.



And the finished dowel, sitting atop my little jig.



Thanks for looking!

Tom
 

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Dowel Stock Preparator!

I've been fiddling with wooden hinges, and can't get good dowel stock. Epecially dowel stock that matches the species of wood I'm working with. I gleaned this jig from another Rob Cosman video.

I took a 2" piece of walnut from the scrap pile. I drilled a 1/4" (0.247" actually) hole in it close to one face. I took a few passes through the drum sander to just show the hole cut. I chamfered one end to accept the workpiece stock. I clamped an old plane iron creating an awkward looking jig.





My first pass came out too thin. I clamped a playing card between the iron and the walnut. My second attempt came out at 0.247". Blind ass luck to get it that close, however, my intent was to go for that diameter, so 2nd attempt or 12th attempt, I was in for the long haul.

Here's the process of making the dowel:

I started by ripping a few 5/16" strips from the stock I'm using to make my box. Sorry Niki, I used the GRRipper. I don't think it's an accident waiting to happen. I use the GRRipper in conjunction with the MJ Splitter.



After I get a piece of oversized square stock, I chuck it up in my hand drill and use the belt sander to sharpen the end of it to go into the jig.



I wanted to knock off the edges to make more of an octagon to relieve stress on the jig. I could have done this on the tablesaw with the blade at 45, but this isn't a precision maneuver, so I just used the belt sander. Next time I'm going to use a small parts clamp I have to knock the edges off first, then sharpen the end. This way, I had to hold them with my fingers, risking a slight manicure while I was doing it. I might have used the GRRipper for this too, but would have just been to torment, Niki.



I chuck the stock up in the drill, and then head to the jig.



This is a picture of the stock part way through the jig.



When I get near the end of the stock, I reverse the drill, chuck up the other end, and pull it through.



And the finished dowel, sitting atop my little jig.



Thanks for looking!

Tom
Hey Tom -

I think we are watching the same videos! I am working on the same thing. I am experimenting with using set screws to adjust the angle and set of the blade. Awesome job!

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Dowel Stock Preparator!

I've been fiddling with wooden hinges, and can't get good dowel stock. Epecially dowel stock that matches the species of wood I'm working with. I gleaned this jig from another Rob Cosman video.

I took a 2" piece of walnut from the scrap pile. I drilled a 1/4" (0.247" actually) hole in it close to one face. I took a few passes through the drum sander to just show the hole cut. I chamfered one end to accept the workpiece stock. I clamped an old plane iron creating an awkward looking jig.





My first pass came out too thin. I clamped a playing card between the iron and the walnut. My second attempt came out at 0.247". Blind ass luck to get it that close, however, my intent was to go for that diameter, so 2nd attempt or 12th attempt, I was in for the long haul.

Here's the process of making the dowel:

I started by ripping a few 5/16" strips from the stock I'm using to make my box. Sorry Niki, I used the GRRipper. I don't think it's an accident waiting to happen. I use the GRRipper in conjunction with the MJ Splitter.



After I get a piece of oversized square stock, I chuck it up in my hand drill and use the belt sander to sharpen the end of it to go into the jig.



I wanted to knock off the edges to make more of an octagon to relieve stress on the jig. I could have done this on the tablesaw with the blade at 45, but this isn't a precision maneuver, so I just used the belt sander. Next time I'm going to use a small parts clamp I have to knock the edges off first, then sharpen the end. This way, I had to hold them with my fingers, risking a slight manicure while I was doing it. I might have used the GRRipper for this too, but would have just been to torment, Niki.



I chuck the stock up in the drill, and then head to the jig.



This is a picture of the stock part way through the jig.



When I get near the end of the stock, I reverse the drill, chuck up the other end, and pull it through.



And the finished dowel, sitting atop my little jig.



Thanks for looking!

Tom
David, I would have probably come up with a better way to ajust it if it hadn't of come out spot on so quick. I'm not touching it now. Maybe my other size jigs will be a little more sophisticated, by this little 1/4" baby is a lock.
 

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Dowel Stock Preparator!

I've been fiddling with wooden hinges, and can't get good dowel stock. Epecially dowel stock that matches the species of wood I'm working with. I gleaned this jig from another Rob Cosman video.

I took a 2" piece of walnut from the scrap pile. I drilled a 1/4" (0.247" actually) hole in it close to one face. I took a few passes through the drum sander to just show the hole cut. I chamfered one end to accept the workpiece stock. I clamped an old plane iron creating an awkward looking jig.





My first pass came out too thin. I clamped a playing card between the iron and the walnut. My second attempt came out at 0.247". Blind ass luck to get it that close, however, my intent was to go for that diameter, so 2nd attempt or 12th attempt, I was in for the long haul.

Here's the process of making the dowel:

I started by ripping a few 5/16" strips from the stock I'm using to make my box. Sorry Niki, I used the GRRipper. I don't think it's an accident waiting to happen. I use the GRRipper in conjunction with the MJ Splitter.



After I get a piece of oversized square stock, I chuck it up in my hand drill and use the belt sander to sharpen the end of it to go into the jig.



I wanted to knock off the edges to make more of an octagon to relieve stress on the jig. I could have done this on the tablesaw with the blade at 45, but this isn't a precision maneuver, so I just used the belt sander. Next time I'm going to use a small parts clamp I have to knock the edges off first, then sharpen the end. This way, I had to hold them with my fingers, risking a slight manicure while I was doing it. I might have used the GRRipper for this too, but would have just been to torment, Niki.



I chuck the stock up in the drill, and then head to the jig.



This is a picture of the stock part way through the jig.



When I get near the end of the stock, I reverse the drill, chuck up the other end, and pull it through.



And the finished dowel, sitting atop my little jig.



Thanks for looking!

Tom
Very cool!

I wish those Grrippers weren't so expensive. They look so handy.
 
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