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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Looks Sweet mate and your getting good on the whole SU design cant wait to see the finished peice
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Looking forward to seeing this one take shape Blake, cool design, did you consider doing something with the profile of the apron (similar to the edge of the top)? Might be too busy but something to chew on.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
and to think that you were going to give it all up. Looks great man
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Wow, neat Blake….......... can't wait to see the finished product. Those legs are going to be a challenge????
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
HI BLake, Very nice design. I think you will have captured the feel of the jellyfish. Please post photos when you are finished or during the process.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Great design Blake. I'm betting the table will surpass the jellyfish piece. What do you plan on making the legs from?
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Jelly, of course!
 
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13,555 Posts
Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
The table going to be a challenge to build but I think you can do it.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Extraordinary! Very nicely rendered. I'm sure your eclectic client will be just a pleased with the final result. Nice going, Blake.

always,
J.C.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
That's a wild one cool design.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Good looking design Blake!

Are you planning to make the tentacles all uniform in position and shape, or are you going unique with them?

There was a similar multi-legged table with unique legs on the back cover of FWW at some point this year. I can't for the life of me remember when though.
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Sorry the jelly fish just definitely doesn't do it for me but your table will be nice I have a book with a similar table in it with metal legs , it looks great my 2 cents Alistair
 

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Sketchup Design

A friend of mine has been telling me for a while that he had shown his parents my website and that they love my work and wanted me to make them something.

Well they eventually contacted me and commissioned me to make a table for them.

They bought a lamp from an artist named Brian Giambastiani, which looks like a Jellyfish. The head, which illuminates, is made of blown glass, and the tentacles are copper wire. It is about 40" tall.



So my challenge was to build a table that would compliment the lamp. Now keep in mind, my client's home is very eclectic in style, with lots of different colors, curves, shapes, and textures. She loves things that are other than ordinary, and practically every piece of furniture in the house is an individual art piece.

So this is the design I came up with, and she loved it…





I plan to use blue aniline die on the figured maple top to make the grain "pop" like an electric guitar. It will finish something like this: (random guitar photo from the internet)







This is what it will look like in my client's home with a simulated Jellyfish lamp sitting on it. It is going to sit in a little alcove by the front entranceway…



Feel free to post comments. I will blog the whole building process.
Blake,

Your creativity never seizes to amaze me. I think you captured the essence of the light without being too literal. I cannot wait to see you blog this one. Especially the legs and the finish work on this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Getting Started... I found my Lumber!

I went to a place called "Global Wood Source" in San Jose, which is the most amazing place I've ever been for lumber. The owner travels around the world in search of only the best and most amazingly figured woods. He's got stuff you can't find anywhere else. Check out their website and if you are anywhere near San Jose you have to stop by.

Anyway, I found the perfect lumber for my table top. Three slabs of figured maple over 2" thick. I also bought the maple for the legs, and the mahogany for the apron. And while I was at it I stocked up on mahogany 3×3 "table leg stock" for future projects, as well as a few more impulse buys. Once you get on a roll like that "Russ" starts giving you great deals on stuff. I think I was probably their best customer that day… or week? It was the best lumber shopping spree I've ever had… and it happened to be my birthday, so it was a good day :)

This is what my truck looked like when I came home:



THE TABLE TOP

Luckily I have a friend in Santa Cruz who has a large woodshop. I had to use his 19" bandsaw, 12" tablesaw, and 15" planer to get my table-top slabs milled down to a manageable size.

Here are the three rough slabs in my friend's shop. We arranged them in a way that showed off the best figure.





Here they are back in my shop now that they've been planed and jointed. They are staggered in a way that makes the figure look the most continuous. I will chop them to length last.



One of my favorite tools to use:



Yum, Biscuits!



I glued it up in two stages. ONE…



TWO…



Now, as you can tell from my original Sketchup, I had originally planned to have a natural edge in the front of the table.



But nothing was available that fit all my criteria. So I found that piece with the long curved void through the middle and thought I would put that in the front of the table instead.

But as I was clamping that piece on the uneven tension broke the front of that void. I didn't even flinch. I knew instantly that it was a good thing, and I knew just what to do. It had been bugging me the whole time anyway.

So I put the giant glued-up table top on my bandsaw and turned that void into a "semi-natural edge."





Now that I actually have sharp hand tools (thanks to my best friend the WorkSharp) I am starting to reap the benefits. I got to enjoy the quiet, therapeutic sattisfaction of smoothing the top with my good old Stanley No. 5.



THE LEGS

I took some measurements right out of sketchup to draw the leg curves on to MDF to make the lamination forms.





I am making two forms, so I will glue up the 8 legs in four stages. Each form is 1 1/2" thick (two layers of 3/4" MDF) to accommodate the 1"x1" legs. So I attached all four layers and cut them together on the bandsaw:



Here are the two forms, each glued and screwed to their bases. In the background are the free-moving "mates." The maple strips will be clamped between the two halves and pressed flat against the base. The reason they are outside is that they have received two cans of spray-on shellac to keep the lamination glue from sticking to the forms.



One of the forms back inside on my bench, ready for glue up (standing on edge while the shellac dries)



Here is the maple for the legs:



Here is a shot of the set-up for ripping the strips. This is a very tedious job, because each of the eight legs needs ten 1/10" strips to end up 1" thick. So 80 four-foot long strips. Its probably time to sharpen my ripping blade, too.



I had to stop after making 20 strips, enough for my first two legs. But I won't change the tablesaw set-up until all the strips are cut. I didn't have time to start mixing the glue so I will probably get to that tomorrow.

Total building time so far: About 9 hours.
 

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Getting Started... I found my Lumber!

I went to a place called "Global Wood Source" in San Jose, which is the most amazing place I've ever been for lumber. The owner travels around the world in search of only the best and most amazingly figured woods. He's got stuff you can't find anywhere else. Check out their website and if you are anywhere near San Jose you have to stop by.

Anyway, I found the perfect lumber for my table top. Three slabs of figured maple over 2" thick. I also bought the maple for the legs, and the mahogany for the apron. And while I was at it I stocked up on mahogany 3×3 "table leg stock" for future projects, as well as a few more impulse buys. Once you get on a roll like that "Russ" starts giving you great deals on stuff. I think I was probably their best customer that day… or week? It was the best lumber shopping spree I've ever had… and it happened to be my birthday, so it was a good day :)

This is what my truck looked like when I came home:



THE TABLE TOP

Luckily I have a friend in Santa Cruz who has a large woodshop. I had to use his 19" bandsaw, 12" tablesaw, and 15" planer to get my table-top slabs milled down to a manageable size.

Here are the three rough slabs in my friend's shop. We arranged them in a way that showed off the best figure.





Here they are back in my shop now that they've been planed and jointed. They are staggered in a way that makes the figure look the most continuous. I will chop them to length last.



One of my favorite tools to use:



Yum, Biscuits!



I glued it up in two stages. ONE…



TWO…



Now, as you can tell from my original Sketchup, I had originally planned to have a natural edge in the front of the table.



But nothing was available that fit all my criteria. So I found that piece with the long curved void through the middle and thought I would put that in the front of the table instead.

But as I was clamping that piece on the uneven tension broke the front of that void. I didn't even flinch. I knew instantly that it was a good thing, and I knew just what to do. It had been bugging me the whole time anyway.

So I put the giant glued-up table top on my bandsaw and turned that void into a "semi-natural edge."





Now that I actually have sharp hand tools (thanks to my best friend the WorkSharp) I am starting to reap the benefits. I got to enjoy the quiet, therapeutic sattisfaction of smoothing the top with my good old Stanley No. 5.



THE LEGS

I took some measurements right out of sketchup to draw the leg curves on to MDF to make the lamination forms.





I am making two forms, so I will glue up the 8 legs in four stages. Each form is 1 1/2" thick (two layers of 3/4" MDF) to accommodate the 1"x1" legs. So I attached all four layers and cut them together on the bandsaw:



Here are the two forms, each glued and screwed to their bases. In the background are the free-moving "mates." The maple strips will be clamped between the two halves and pressed flat against the base. The reason they are outside is that they have received two cans of spray-on shellac to keep the lamination glue from sticking to the forms.



One of the forms back inside on my bench, ready for glue up (standing on edge while the shellac dries)



Here is the maple for the legs:



Here is a shot of the set-up for ripping the strips. This is a very tedious job, because each of the eight legs needs ten 1/10" strips to end up 1" thick. So 80 four-foot long strips. Its probably time to sharpen my ripping blade, too.



I had to stop after making 20 strips, enough for my first two legs. But I won't change the tablesaw set-up until all the strips are cut. I didn't have time to start mixing the glue so I will probably get to that tomorrow.

Total building time so far: About 9 hours.
Hey Blake, this is a nice #9,000 LJ blog entry ;)
Keep building!
 

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Getting Started... I found my Lumber!

I went to a place called "Global Wood Source" in San Jose, which is the most amazing place I've ever been for lumber. The owner travels around the world in search of only the best and most amazingly figured woods. He's got stuff you can't find anywhere else. Check out their website and if you are anywhere near San Jose you have to stop by.

Anyway, I found the perfect lumber for my table top. Three slabs of figured maple over 2" thick. I also bought the maple for the legs, and the mahogany for the apron. And while I was at it I stocked up on mahogany 3×3 "table leg stock" for future projects, as well as a few more impulse buys. Once you get on a roll like that "Russ" starts giving you great deals on stuff. I think I was probably their best customer that day… or week? It was the best lumber shopping spree I've ever had… and it happened to be my birthday, so it was a good day :)

This is what my truck looked like when I came home:



THE TABLE TOP

Luckily I have a friend in Santa Cruz who has a large woodshop. I had to use his 19" bandsaw, 12" tablesaw, and 15" planer to get my table-top slabs milled down to a manageable size.

Here are the three rough slabs in my friend's shop. We arranged them in a way that showed off the best figure.





Here they are back in my shop now that they've been planed and jointed. They are staggered in a way that makes the figure look the most continuous. I will chop them to length last.



One of my favorite tools to use:



Yum, Biscuits!



I glued it up in two stages. ONE…



TWO…



Now, as you can tell from my original Sketchup, I had originally planned to have a natural edge in the front of the table.



But nothing was available that fit all my criteria. So I found that piece with the long curved void through the middle and thought I would put that in the front of the table instead.

But as I was clamping that piece on the uneven tension broke the front of that void. I didn't even flinch. I knew instantly that it was a good thing, and I knew just what to do. It had been bugging me the whole time anyway.

So I put the giant glued-up table top on my bandsaw and turned that void into a "semi-natural edge."





Now that I actually have sharp hand tools (thanks to my best friend the WorkSharp) I am starting to reap the benefits. I got to enjoy the quiet, therapeutic sattisfaction of smoothing the top with my good old Stanley No. 5.



THE LEGS

I took some measurements right out of sketchup to draw the leg curves on to MDF to make the lamination forms.





I am making two forms, so I will glue up the 8 legs in four stages. Each form is 1 1/2" thick (two layers of 3/4" MDF) to accommodate the 1"x1" legs. So I attached all four layers and cut them together on the bandsaw:



Here are the two forms, each glued and screwed to their bases. In the background are the free-moving "mates." The maple strips will be clamped between the two halves and pressed flat against the base. The reason they are outside is that they have received two cans of spray-on shellac to keep the lamination glue from sticking to the forms.



One of the forms back inside on my bench, ready for glue up (standing on edge while the shellac dries)



Here is the maple for the legs:



Here is a shot of the set-up for ripping the strips. This is a very tedious job, because each of the eight legs needs ten 1/10" strips to end up 1" thick. So 80 four-foot long strips. Its probably time to sharpen my ripping blade, too.



I had to stop after making 20 strips, enough for my first two legs. But I won't change the tablesaw set-up until all the strips are cut. I didn't have time to start mixing the glue so I will probably get to that tomorrow.

Total building time so far: About 9 hours.
nice job blake. im really curious to see how this one looks in the end
 

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Getting Started... I found my Lumber!

I went to a place called "Global Wood Source" in San Jose, which is the most amazing place I've ever been for lumber. The owner travels around the world in search of only the best and most amazingly figured woods. He's got stuff you can't find anywhere else. Check out their website and if you are anywhere near San Jose you have to stop by.

Anyway, I found the perfect lumber for my table top. Three slabs of figured maple over 2" thick. I also bought the maple for the legs, and the mahogany for the apron. And while I was at it I stocked up on mahogany 3×3 "table leg stock" for future projects, as well as a few more impulse buys. Once you get on a roll like that "Russ" starts giving you great deals on stuff. I think I was probably their best customer that day… or week? It was the best lumber shopping spree I've ever had… and it happened to be my birthday, so it was a good day :)

This is what my truck looked like when I came home:



THE TABLE TOP

Luckily I have a friend in Santa Cruz who has a large woodshop. I had to use his 19" bandsaw, 12" tablesaw, and 15" planer to get my table-top slabs milled down to a manageable size.

Here are the three rough slabs in my friend's shop. We arranged them in a way that showed off the best figure.





Here they are back in my shop now that they've been planed and jointed. They are staggered in a way that makes the figure look the most continuous. I will chop them to length last.



One of my favorite tools to use:



Yum, Biscuits!



I glued it up in two stages. ONE…



TWO…



Now, as you can tell from my original Sketchup, I had originally planned to have a natural edge in the front of the table.



But nothing was available that fit all my criteria. So I found that piece with the long curved void through the middle and thought I would put that in the front of the table instead.

But as I was clamping that piece on the uneven tension broke the front of that void. I didn't even flinch. I knew instantly that it was a good thing, and I knew just what to do. It had been bugging me the whole time anyway.

So I put the giant glued-up table top on my bandsaw and turned that void into a "semi-natural edge."





Now that I actually have sharp hand tools (thanks to my best friend the WorkSharp) I am starting to reap the benefits. I got to enjoy the quiet, therapeutic sattisfaction of smoothing the top with my good old Stanley No. 5.



THE LEGS

I took some measurements right out of sketchup to draw the leg curves on to MDF to make the lamination forms.





I am making two forms, so I will glue up the 8 legs in four stages. Each form is 1 1/2" thick (two layers of 3/4" MDF) to accommodate the 1"x1" legs. So I attached all four layers and cut them together on the bandsaw:



Here are the two forms, each glued and screwed to their bases. In the background are the free-moving "mates." The maple strips will be clamped between the two halves and pressed flat against the base. The reason they are outside is that they have received two cans of spray-on shellac to keep the lamination glue from sticking to the forms.



One of the forms back inside on my bench, ready for glue up (standing on edge while the shellac dries)



Here is the maple for the legs:



Here is a shot of the set-up for ripping the strips. This is a very tedious job, because each of the eight legs needs ten 1/10" strips to end up 1" thick. So 80 four-foot long strips. Its probably time to sharpen my ripping blade, too.



I had to stop after making 20 strips, enough for my first two legs. But I won't change the tablesaw set-up until all the strips are cut. I didn't have time to start mixing the glue so I will probably get to that tomorrow.

Total building time so far: About 9 hours.
Blake, this is coming together nicely. I love the figured boards that you chose for the table and putting the "natural edge" on the top the way you did looks pretty good. I have to admit when I looked at the first set of photos I was wondering how you were going to treat the void but this works much better, in my opinion.
 

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Getting Started... I found my Lumber!

I went to a place called "Global Wood Source" in San Jose, which is the most amazing place I've ever been for lumber. The owner travels around the world in search of only the best and most amazingly figured woods. He's got stuff you can't find anywhere else. Check out their website and if you are anywhere near San Jose you have to stop by.

Anyway, I found the perfect lumber for my table top. Three slabs of figured maple over 2" thick. I also bought the maple for the legs, and the mahogany for the apron. And while I was at it I stocked up on mahogany 3×3 "table leg stock" for future projects, as well as a few more impulse buys. Once you get on a roll like that "Russ" starts giving you great deals on stuff. I think I was probably their best customer that day… or week? It was the best lumber shopping spree I've ever had… and it happened to be my birthday, so it was a good day :)

This is what my truck looked like when I came home:



THE TABLE TOP

Luckily I have a friend in Santa Cruz who has a large woodshop. I had to use his 19" bandsaw, 12" tablesaw, and 15" planer to get my table-top slabs milled down to a manageable size.

Here are the three rough slabs in my friend's shop. We arranged them in a way that showed off the best figure.





Here they are back in my shop now that they've been planed and jointed. They are staggered in a way that makes the figure look the most continuous. I will chop them to length last.



One of my favorite tools to use:



Yum, Biscuits!



I glued it up in two stages. ONE…



TWO…



Now, as you can tell from my original Sketchup, I had originally planned to have a natural edge in the front of the table.



But nothing was available that fit all my criteria. So I found that piece with the long curved void through the middle and thought I would put that in the front of the table instead.

But as I was clamping that piece on the uneven tension broke the front of that void. I didn't even flinch. I knew instantly that it was a good thing, and I knew just what to do. It had been bugging me the whole time anyway.

So I put the giant glued-up table top on my bandsaw and turned that void into a "semi-natural edge."





Now that I actually have sharp hand tools (thanks to my best friend the WorkSharp) I am starting to reap the benefits. I got to enjoy the quiet, therapeutic sattisfaction of smoothing the top with my good old Stanley No. 5.



THE LEGS

I took some measurements right out of sketchup to draw the leg curves on to MDF to make the lamination forms.





I am making two forms, so I will glue up the 8 legs in four stages. Each form is 1 1/2" thick (two layers of 3/4" MDF) to accommodate the 1"x1" legs. So I attached all four layers and cut them together on the bandsaw:



Here are the two forms, each glued and screwed to their bases. In the background are the free-moving "mates." The maple strips will be clamped between the two halves and pressed flat against the base. The reason they are outside is that they have received two cans of spray-on shellac to keep the lamination glue from sticking to the forms.



One of the forms back inside on my bench, ready for glue up (standing on edge while the shellac dries)



Here is the maple for the legs:



Here is a shot of the set-up for ripping the strips. This is a very tedious job, because each of the eight legs needs ten 1/10" strips to end up 1" thick. So 80 four-foot long strips. Its probably time to sharpen my ripping blade, too.



I had to stop after making 20 strips, enough for my first two legs. But I won't change the tablesaw set-up until all the strips are cut. I didn't have time to start mixing the glue so I will probably get to that tomorrow.

Total building time so far: About 9 hours.
Looks good blake, thats some really nice maple!
 

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Getting Started... I found my Lumber!

I went to a place called "Global Wood Source" in San Jose, which is the most amazing place I've ever been for lumber. The owner travels around the world in search of only the best and most amazingly figured woods. He's got stuff you can't find anywhere else. Check out their website and if you are anywhere near San Jose you have to stop by.

Anyway, I found the perfect lumber for my table top. Three slabs of figured maple over 2" thick. I also bought the maple for the legs, and the mahogany for the apron. And while I was at it I stocked up on mahogany 3×3 "table leg stock" for future projects, as well as a few more impulse buys. Once you get on a roll like that "Russ" starts giving you great deals on stuff. I think I was probably their best customer that day… or week? It was the best lumber shopping spree I've ever had… and it happened to be my birthday, so it was a good day :)

This is what my truck looked like when I came home:



THE TABLE TOP

Luckily I have a friend in Santa Cruz who has a large woodshop. I had to use his 19" bandsaw, 12" tablesaw, and 15" planer to get my table-top slabs milled down to a manageable size.

Here are the three rough slabs in my friend's shop. We arranged them in a way that showed off the best figure.





Here they are back in my shop now that they've been planed and jointed. They are staggered in a way that makes the figure look the most continuous. I will chop them to length last.



One of my favorite tools to use:



Yum, Biscuits!



I glued it up in two stages. ONE…



TWO…



Now, as you can tell from my original Sketchup, I had originally planned to have a natural edge in the front of the table.



But nothing was available that fit all my criteria. So I found that piece with the long curved void through the middle and thought I would put that in the front of the table instead.

But as I was clamping that piece on the uneven tension broke the front of that void. I didn't even flinch. I knew instantly that it was a good thing, and I knew just what to do. It had been bugging me the whole time anyway.

So I put the giant glued-up table top on my bandsaw and turned that void into a "semi-natural edge."





Now that I actually have sharp hand tools (thanks to my best friend the WorkSharp) I am starting to reap the benefits. I got to enjoy the quiet, therapeutic sattisfaction of smoothing the top with my good old Stanley No. 5.



THE LEGS

I took some measurements right out of sketchup to draw the leg curves on to MDF to make the lamination forms.





I am making two forms, so I will glue up the 8 legs in four stages. Each form is 1 1/2" thick (two layers of 3/4" MDF) to accommodate the 1"x1" legs. So I attached all four layers and cut them together on the bandsaw:



Here are the two forms, each glued and screwed to their bases. In the background are the free-moving "mates." The maple strips will be clamped between the two halves and pressed flat against the base. The reason they are outside is that they have received two cans of spray-on shellac to keep the lamination glue from sticking to the forms.



One of the forms back inside on my bench, ready for glue up (standing on edge while the shellac dries)



Here is the maple for the legs:



Here is a shot of the set-up for ripping the strips. This is a very tedious job, because each of the eight legs needs ten 1/10" strips to end up 1" thick. So 80 four-foot long strips. Its probably time to sharpen my ripping blade, too.



I had to stop after making 20 strips, enough for my first two legs. But I won't change the tablesaw set-up until all the strips are cut. I didn't have time to start mixing the glue so I will probably get to that tomorrow.

Total building time so far: About 9 hours.
Blake, Nice job, I'm looking forward to the leg glue up and the technique of making them. The table top is awesome a super thick slab of wood will make this a rugged piece of furniture. Would you consider slightly contouring the back two corners just enough to get rid of the squareness on the back side it may help give this table more of a "jelly" feel.
 
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