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Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Glorious. I love the sliding lid idea. Consider it stolen by me;)
 

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Registered
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181 Posts
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads,

What a great project and great story, I am sure LuLu loved it.

Also a great reminder that hopefully our kids will think back on us when they grow old and smell that old familiar smell of fresh cut wood.
 

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Registered
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1,149 Posts
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Nice!
 

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Registered
Joined
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2,806 Posts
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Every time I see you make a box I learn something wonderful.

Thanks for this one.
 

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Registered
Joined
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18,678 Posts
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
<nothing>
 

·
Registered
Joined
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7,192 Posts
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
I keep looking out for nice bit of Danish urban recyclable wood. Mads can you imagine me on the way to the client site, telling the taxi driver to slam on the brakes and keep the meter running. Jumping out the cab and smashing up a piece of furniture that has been left by the side of the road. Throwing the bits in the trunk, dusting off my suit and jumping back in the taxi.

If that wasn't bad enough, imagine me walking into the client's office with a broken up chest of drawers under my arm like it was the most natural thing in the world. I think they might call the men in white coats to come and take me away. :)

I am SO going to do it though!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Hi guys,
Andy, yes that could be really cool, STOP! I can easy imagine you like this. My daughter sometimes shake her head when I arrive to pick her up with a pallet in the back seat or for table legs on the floor of the car, she even got stressed when I drowe her to shool and stopped three times to look for good wood. Now she take the train so I'm not up often at seven in the morning before the trash guys take it all, but perhaps I will have to take some morning rides to look again. My latest finds was some wonderful hardwood parasol, the rod is thick and round hardwood, perfect for the lathe. A shame you could not join us tonight.

Don, I laugh big time! Thank you.

RG, smile here, perhaps just not always woodworking…

Ksslim, cool.

StevieP, yes I hope so too, right now my daughter is on her way in the teenage years so she like to dislike, but I remember this clearly myself, and she have the most wonderful mind and heart so all roads are open.

Al, I stole it from the Japanese, so you are stealing from them - laugh.

Soda, yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaa.

Best thoughts and thank you all for the sweet comments,
Mads
 

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Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Great.
 

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Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
What a great little box! Love that it's recycled.

Reminds me of this recent blog post by Kari Hultman and one of the comments references an interesting little video entitled The Story of Stuff
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
 

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Registered
Joined
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652 Posts
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Where did you get the marking knife? Or where did you get the steel to make the knife, as it is more likely you made it.

Great little box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
I got it from Germany…
http://www.mehr-als-werkzeug.de/product/717111/Marking-Knife.htm
But here are one from Japan:
http://cgi.ebay.com/Shouzou-Shiragaki-Japanese-Marking-Knife-12-18mm-9-/200547324234
No I did not make it, but it could be done from cuting of a piece of steel from a circular saw or a plane iron…
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
Japanese chisel box (urban recycle project) gift...

Japanese chisel box.
Urban recycle project.

Ok he lost it!

This box was actually made as a gift for a very special friends birthday, her name is Lulu, Lulus father is a cabinetmaker and so she grew up with the smell of fresh shaves, she love that smell and for this reason it was for me a must to make her a gift that smelled wood and that was made with my hands.

Is not only a box, it is a little box that are a reproduction of one I made a long time ago and call the Japanese chisel box because it has the right size for storing chisels, and because it is a small copy of the traditional Japanese toolbox.

Urban recycle what is that?
It is an idea that I have a wish, a hope. If we look around us so much are trashed, and in the city the streets are floating with stuff, trash to some, but with the right intentions and a little creativity a lot of this can be reclaimed, we can use what some see as trash and transform it into useful and perhaps even esthetic items.
If the little Japanese chisel box Lulu got is esthetic this I will leave to others, but it is useful and it came from my heart and are now officially urban recycle.


What is he talking about?
A board taken of a pallet in the street, it might come from another country and have had its life transporting goods.
A box for fruit, this one is the standard box for fruit delivery in Denmark and plenty of people put them in the street for trash every week, also shops get fruits in boxes like this, and they are made from a thin three layered plywood or a thin wood, and a fiberboard bottom.


Samples comes out to put it apart.


When the bottom are out you might just do like this to cut it up if you don't need the full length of the wood.
Of course this can be done with a handsaw.


Here is what I ended up with.
The bits and pieces can end in the fireplace if you have one.


So first a cut up to clean the sides up.


And of course I use a Japanese plane to plane the boards, but it is not needed if you do not have a plane.


I also use a no. 7, to set the board straight.
Big boy's big toys, and he is not Japanese.


Now decide the length of the box and cut up one piece of the thin plywood and two pieces of the pallet wood.


Here I clean it up on the table saw so I am sure they are all true.


Put the two sides on top of the bottom and measure the space left, this will be the width of the inside so we can cut of the end pieces in this size, and we also need this measure to make the slide in lid.


Cut the two end pieces.


Ok I'm late for the birthday, so I'll have to wrap it up like this and go!
Lulu will be in a guessing game then, and I will finish it when I come back.
By the way, it was a wonderful birthday party, wonderful people, we had a good time, Lulu seemed to be happy for the day and I left late thinking of a dinosaur walking on a beach but that is a long story that have a hard time leaving my head.


Time to fasten the bottom, for this I use glue and nails.
I chosen some beautiful nails made of copper since the box is for Lulu and she has a strong sense for details, and will be aware that they will grow more and more beautiful as time goes, and also it can add a little femininity.
To make sure the nails will not break the wood I pre drill. This I do with my push drill and drill points (I love the look and the use of that tool).


Time to glue.


Ends also.


Bottom up.
And nails to hold it together. Since it is a Japanese box I go after the rule, as few nails as possible.


Tome to make the lid.
Plywood in the width of the box.


Mark up how wide you want it, it needs a little width to grip the lid.
Cut two of these.


It should look like this.


Glue, even when out of focus…


Pre drill and nails.
Here I use little Miss Debbie to help me (The hammer).


Three on a line.


End looks like this now.
Hope you get the big picture.


For the sliding lid we need some plywood in the width of the box and some in the width of the inside of the box.


Cut of two pieces like this that are in the width of the box.
Now we need focus!
The two pieces must be placed as seen on the picture.
Place the lids end against the one opening.
Tape one small piece to the lid a little distance from the opening.
Tape the other small piece to the other end so it is barely against the other opening.


Now app. double the size of the upper side end and mark it.
(This is not so clear so look at the last picture).


Pre drill.


Glue and nail.


Turn the lid around and bend the nails over.


To close the box put the longest end down inside the box.


Push it to it meets the end and push it down.
Then pull it back and the lid will be 'locked'.


The box is a reality
Time to smoke the pipe.
No! It's time to run again over to Lulu since she just called and invited me for a coffee.


So a light wrap and a handful of shaves inside and off to coffee.
Thank you Lulu.

Perhaps this can inspire to make gifts, make Japanese tool or chisel boxes or even some urban recycle, the choice is yours.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Remember to check sizes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
 

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Registered
Joined
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88 Posts
Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
Nice work Mads!

I do Japanese joinery but I use a modern sumitsubo as they're generally a bit less messy. Are you going to use the proper silk line for it or something else?

You'll need to make a sumisashi next :)
 

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Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
Looks pretty cool. Looking forward to seeing it in use.
 

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Joined
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Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
Looks great.
I never really thought about the history of the chaulk line.
It only make sence that if your going to take the time to position and measure out 2 points in the hopes of joining those 2 points with a straight line that one would have a tool for such a task … ...

and more to the point i'm now sure (thanks to Mads) that Stanley didn't invent the chauld line : )

Can't wait to see the sumisashi that accompanies this great little tool.
 

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Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
Mads caught a fish…or did the fish catch him?
 

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Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
Awesome ink pot! You know I love the fishies. The "pulley" made on the drill press is a stroke of genius.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,678 Posts
Sumitsubo I (Japanese ink pot)

Sumitsubo I
Japanese ink pot.


The Sumitsubo is the Japanese counterpart to our chalk line.
Here a drawing of how I wanted mine to look.

It is used to mark long straight lines on wood, and used together with the sumisashi (pen made of bamboo) the Sumitsubo was traditionally made by the carpenter himself, and where the Japanese tools in general are really simple and free of decoration, the Sumitsubo is usually a carved and even ornamented tool. It origins from China and perhaps this is why it has it's form, or perhaps the Japanese woodworkers just needed this one piece to show his skills to the colleagues since he's other tools were all simple and only the quality and making of the iron in the plane really made it stand out. At least it could provide a young carpenter or apprentice to show his skills and stand out if he could not afford the more expensive tools, but this is just me guessing.

I choose the fish shape because I once saw one with this shape, and found it a elegant and more simple shape than the often seen dragon by the well, and I have a soft spot for the ocean and the fish so it had to be so.

So as so often before this project is made of inexpensive wood, in fact a piece of beech found in my friends firewood pile.


Re sawing the firewood into a fairly straight sided piece of wood.
Just free handing since it will be shaped later.


With a pencil trying to imagine how it could look in plan and side view before I take some final decisions.
As you can see I try to play with different tail shapes, but I usually like to make the final lines in the cut and sanding, to follow and read the life of the wood, and where it want to bring me.
What is important is to make room enough for the wheel and the Ike (ink pot), this to make sure I will not cut or drill too deep later.


Once the shape is there, I mark the center so I am sure it will be relatively equal on both sides.


Could have carved out the holes for the Ike and the wheel but since I am still lazy and only have limited amount of energy a Forstner bit and a drill press comes in handy.
Set the deepness so it will not go deeper than needed, perhaps a little less than needed and then clean up later.


Drilling and the dust control is on (I usually always forget this).
Holes as close to each other as possible without the drill slips.


Larger hole, larger bit.


And the cleanup of the holes.


Now it's getting fun, the first shaping, I use the band saw, and this is probably the moment where you can make the worst mistakes, so keep that tongue straight in the mouth.


And we have a fish!!!
(Or kind of…).


The real shaping starts, I like to use drawknife for rough shaping, spokeshave to close in, rasps and files.


My Supersander as always…
And then just sandpaper.


Thinking of Wayne and rolling out the carving tools.
No plan just that I want it simple and clear since I will color the Sumitsubo later and this will make the lines less visible.


A hole with a long drill for the line.
You can see I did not clean up the drilling marks in the pot and the hole for the wheel - later you will see why.


A dummy string and a dummy wheel to settle with the last design details.


Cutting a piece of wood for the wheel.
My lathe was not set up so it is faster.


And we have a wheel !!!


A hole in the center with an invisible drill…
Pure magic.


On my quick and dirty circle sanding jig I round the wheel.
But you can also do this on your drill press, lathe or even by hand.


And with something under you can even chamfer the edges like this.
If you hold the wood gently against the sandpaper it will spin.


A screw through the wheel and a spin on the drill press - holding a file against the wood.


Then sandpaper.


Now I can drill a hole for the pin for the wheel.


And put the handle through.


I made the handle simply by bending some brass rod , and a small piece of alu tube for the finger part.


We got a Sumitsubo - more or less.
Man I did it!

I will split the blog here for the once that have a slow web.
Press here for next part: http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25627

Links:
Japanese carpentry tools museeum:
http://www.dougukan.jp/contents-en/modules/tinyd8/index.php?id=2

Sumitsubo set up and use:
http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/wordpress/?p=458

Hope this blog can inspire others to make a Sumitsubo, or perhaps just to have been an interesting reading for someone interested in the Japanese tool culture,

Best thoughts,
Mads
Mads, you are amazing. I wouldn't even think of making my own chalk line. You've turn a simple un-thought of tool into a piece of art. I'm in awe of your imagination.

I'm Smiling here!
 
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