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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads - once again you have delivered a very detailed and interesting blog. Thanks. It was a fun read.

Also (I have to say this) for a guy who says he doesn't have a work-shop, you seem
to have a pretty well stocked work-shop! What's the story?
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
thanks for the picturebook Mads
as usual a pleasurre to look at :)

Dennis
 

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Registered
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877 Posts
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Lovely post as always :)
 

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195 Posts
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Nice job! Thank you for sharing your inspiring work.

Best,

Serge

http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com
 

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Registered
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599 Posts
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads,

Very well done, sir!

Cheers!
 

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7,192 Posts
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Nice job Mads. For the next project though, please can we see some Japanese saw action? The Festool just isn't right for a project like this. :)

You remind me of a song from the 1980s by The Vapors called 'Turning Japanese.' The lyrics in the chorus were:
"Turning Japanese, I think I'm turning Japanese, I really think so."

Funny you should post this now because I made some trestle feet last weekend for a 6' x 6' double-sided notice board. Looking forward to seeing the ponies in use.
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Here are the steps that I use to cut the lobed edges with nothing but Japanese saws, chisels and rasps.

1 - Layout
2 - Make diagonal cut with saw to remove most of the wood.
3 - Make two small notch cuts with saw.
4 - Round the lobes with chisels and rasps.

Handwriting Wood Rectangle Beige Font


Hope this helps.
Bro. Tenzin
 

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420 Posts
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads…..just great…..I love this new series of creativity with the Japanese methods. Really inspiring my friend.

All the best and keep the great blogs coming!

Joe
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Hi Mads,

Very nice, as always! I too love those little Japanese brass clamps. I bought a handful at the Japanese Woodworker in Alameda CA USA, but I was lucky enough to have a morning free when in Japan on business where I went to the store Tokyo Hands. What an amazing store with many floors of art, craft, and household items-worth the extra effort if you ever get over there. I had to hold back to make sure I could fit all my loot in my suitcase!

-Brian
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads, I love it! I have never seen the bamboo technique, I like the idea. Pretty soon you will be shaving with those Japanese planes…
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads

A very cool project

Welcome to the floor. :)
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Wonderful work as always Mads. I hope you will continue to post in English as I'm not too good with Japanese, even though I did spent quit a lot of time in Japan in my youth. No woodworking there unfortunately, but I did gain an appreciation of the simple, yet sophisticated way they do things there. Woodworking is a very good example of that. I hope these benches you are making will keep you in business until you find a suitable shop location.
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
This a great little project. I recommend them to everyone that comes to my shop. If you don't know how you would use them don't worry they have many uses. I made over the years about 4 pairs. They elevate glue-ups providing clamp space, I use them for holding those clip on lights just where I need them, and for me they are small enough to take inside boats and use as a work surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #214 ·
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Hi ho,
Summer is in Copenhagen these days, so I have been at the beach.
Ohhh yes and in Jylland (another part of Denmark).
So no LJ.
Now back to see the comments.
Yes some might think back breaking project, but first of all these are made for Japanese style woodworking, this is really not as back breaking as some might think since you pull and don't push, in fact I am due to my health in a quite bad condition and yet it is really gentle to my body to work this way - but I am still quite flexible and do not have too much extra kilos, these factors might have a influence.
Yes they are great for using as table top horses, since they can lift the wood off the table, kind of like the tabletop workbenches I see on LJ.
I promise I will keep writing in English (my Danish English).
Have to admit I am not just lazy when I use powertools, I have had a operation that have put me in a situuation where I need to measure my effeorts, I simply have to take care of my resourses and so I use powertools sometimes when my body will not allow me to use the handtools (I am retired due to a neck operation).

So cool.

For the workshop, the pictures were taken in the old shop that I have left now…

Best thoughts and thank you for the interesting, funny and kind words,
Mads
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads,

Summer of the Danes eh (I have a book by that title). Since I have a bad neck as well, do you have trouble looking down over these and your planing board?

Tony
 

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Discussion Starter · #216 ·
Japanese toolbox - thoughts

Japanese toolbox
大工の道具箱

I have been looking forward for a while to make this blog, this because the result is one of my favorite woodworking projects, it was like a sum of skills leaned and also a design and history challenge that I enjoyed.
The result is something I am proud of and that I think will stay with me for as long as I live.


At first I made this small one out of trash wood in Paris, meant for chisels.

Later another as a gift for a friend http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25015 .

But after I read Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use' I knew I needed to make myself a real traditional Japanese toolbox one day.

The first part here will be my thoughts about and pictures of Japanese toolboxes.
Or in other words why I ended up with the design that I did.

So sit back and enjoy.


One of the first pictures I ran into was this one, and it did confuse me…
This does not seem to be a traditional toolbox and the tools don't seem to be Japanese…
The frame saw is used in China and Europe, the handsaw seems English!
So why do I show this picture?
To say that the research that I have been able to do is at the web and few books, this do not make a really well documented truth. Writers was perhaps not even woodworkers and even we have an old black and white photo showing someone with a saw, we can't know if this is traditional or not.
The only interesting thing I can conclude from this picture is that the toolbox even the design is different seems to be quite simple and made from cheap wood to transport tools inside.


This picture shows a standard transport box, I think Japanese, but notice the design.
My guess will be that the traditional Japanese toolbox was made this way, that the inspiration came from this.
A simple low priced, fast to make transport box.


Here a later military one, now added hardware for strength.


The inside, elegant.


So finally!
A classic example of the Japanese toolbox.
Pine for low price.
Nails for fast making.
Handles for carry.
Thin wood for light weight (low price).
The simple lid that locks without hardware (low price).
So these are my first conclusions, this because I believe you made your toolbox as young apprentice and so did not have money for something fancy, but also since the Japanese do not value things like we do, they have an approach that are more simple and yet much more sophisticated - you have to earn your status by proving you worth a tool. So a young starter will not go and buy the whole Lie Nielsen set if he had the money, he would buy his tools as needed, when needed and then upgrade as his skills improve. I believe some of us could learn quite a lot from this…


This one with a drawer.


This one I think is really classy, I like the long slim design.
Notice feet, handles with shape and that the bottom boards are sideways (not normal).


Slim and simple.


Larger, double drawers with lock.


New use…


Absolutely charming!


How can you not love this.
If you hire this guy you will know you get a fair price - not like the one in a Van full of Festool power tools…


At work.
The box is used as a holder for the planes.


Or to store them.


Much like a traditional Scandinavian as here.
Quite amazing in a way.


The closest I get to a historical proof…
But quite an interesting museum, hope one day to make savings and go to Japan.
Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum:
http://dougukan.jp/contents-en/


Here from another museum, notice the ends are jointed with a big 'finger joint'.


Not so elegant, but a good guess on how it should look today.
Screwed and nailed together, a mix of woods and plywood, fast low price and solid.
Perhaps the finger joints are a little overkill, but since it is from a school it is probably to learn.
Japanese woodworking school.
http://b-log-b-log.blog.so-net.ne.jp/archive/c2300758805-1


This might be a commercial for the green boxes, but it shows the simple and different types of toolboxes.


Back to the future…
This is where we are today - nice legs.


This might for me be a good proposal for a modern woodworker toolbox.
Lightweight, cheap, waterproof and easy to transport.
(Don't remember where I saw this, sorry).


And this is a Festool insert - in this way you get both…


But back to our friend.
Back to the traditional toolbox.


Found this beginner set on a Japanese site.
And yes it is probably all we need to get started.


Here first day at a Japanese woodworker school.


And the basic tool set.
I can almost imagine how proud the young guy must be.


And here we start, making traditional toolboxes.
Pictures from school with students and then the set and box
http://miyadaiku.hamazo.tv/c536143_6.html


The result - elegant!


And later one for plane storage.



Here my conclusion:
Low price light weight wood: pine.
Thin planed boards for low weight.
No hardware.
Size that I can easy carry.
Proportions slim for elegancy.
A drawer for small things, and for giving myself a challenge of traditional Japanese drawer making.
Finally I choose to buy a bag of bamboo nails, this to try the traditional way, for beauty and again for giving myself a challenge - this I know is not traditional at all.

This video is what made me want to take the extra challenge, to put some traditional cabinetmaking details into my box, and to make the drawer after these principals.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Here an interesting one with different types and plenty of inspiration:
http://www.daikudojo.org/Classes/toolboxes/

Best thoughts,

Mads
 

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Japanese toolbox - thoughts

Japanese toolbox
大工の道具箱

I have been looking forward for a while to make this blog, this because the result is one of my favorite woodworking projects, it was like a sum of skills leaned and also a design and history challenge that I enjoyed.
The result is something I am proud of and that I think will stay with me for as long as I live.


At first I made this small one out of trash wood in Paris, meant for chisels.

Later another as a gift for a friend http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25015 .

But after I read Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use' I knew I needed to make myself a real traditional Japanese toolbox one day.

The first part here will be my thoughts about and pictures of Japanese toolboxes.
Or in other words why I ended up with the design that I did.

So sit back and enjoy.


One of the first pictures I ran into was this one, and it did confuse me…
This does not seem to be a traditional toolbox and the tools don't seem to be Japanese…
The frame saw is used in China and Europe, the handsaw seems English!
So why do I show this picture?
To say that the research that I have been able to do is at the web and few books, this do not make a really well documented truth. Writers was perhaps not even woodworkers and even we have an old black and white photo showing someone with a saw, we can't know if this is traditional or not.
The only interesting thing I can conclude from this picture is that the toolbox even the design is different seems to be quite simple and made from cheap wood to transport tools inside.


This picture shows a standard transport box, I think Japanese, but notice the design.
My guess will be that the traditional Japanese toolbox was made this way, that the inspiration came from this.
A simple low priced, fast to make transport box.


Here a later military one, now added hardware for strength.


The inside, elegant.


So finally!
A classic example of the Japanese toolbox.
Pine for low price.
Nails for fast making.
Handles for carry.
Thin wood for light weight (low price).
The simple lid that locks without hardware (low price).
So these are my first conclusions, this because I believe you made your toolbox as young apprentice and so did not have money for something fancy, but also since the Japanese do not value things like we do, they have an approach that are more simple and yet much more sophisticated - you have to earn your status by proving you worth a tool. So a young starter will not go and buy the whole Lie Nielsen set if he had the money, he would buy his tools as needed, when needed and then upgrade as his skills improve. I believe some of us could learn quite a lot from this…


This one with a drawer.


This one I think is really classy, I like the long slim design.
Notice feet, handles with shape and that the bottom boards are sideways (not normal).


Slim and simple.


Larger, double drawers with lock.


New use…


Absolutely charming!


How can you not love this.
If you hire this guy you will know you get a fair price - not like the one in a Van full of Festool power tools…


At work.
The box is used as a holder for the planes.


Or to store them.


Much like a traditional Scandinavian as here.
Quite amazing in a way.


The closest I get to a historical proof…
But quite an interesting museum, hope one day to make savings and go to Japan.
Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum:
http://dougukan.jp/contents-en/


Here from another museum, notice the ends are jointed with a big 'finger joint'.


Not so elegant, but a good guess on how it should look today.
Screwed and nailed together, a mix of woods and plywood, fast low price and solid.
Perhaps the finger joints are a little overkill, but since it is from a school it is probably to learn.
Japanese woodworking school.
http://b-log-b-log.blog.so-net.ne.jp/archive/c2300758805-1


This might be a commercial for the green boxes, but it shows the simple and different types of toolboxes.


Back to the future…
This is where we are today - nice legs.


This might for me be a good proposal for a modern woodworker toolbox.
Lightweight, cheap, waterproof and easy to transport.
(Don't remember where I saw this, sorry).


And this is a Festool insert - in this way you get both…


But back to our friend.
Back to the traditional toolbox.


Found this beginner set on a Japanese site.
And yes it is probably all we need to get started.


Here first day at a Japanese woodworker school.


And the basic tool set.
I can almost imagine how proud the young guy must be.


And here we start, making traditional toolboxes.
Pictures from school with students and then the set and box
http://miyadaiku.hamazo.tv/c536143_6.html


The result - elegant!


And later one for plane storage.



Here my conclusion:
Low price light weight wood: pine.
Thin planed boards for low weight.
No hardware.
Size that I can easy carry.
Proportions slim for elegancy.
A drawer for small things, and for giving myself a challenge of traditional Japanese drawer making.
Finally I choose to buy a bag of bamboo nails, this to try the traditional way, for beauty and again for giving myself a challenge - this I know is not traditional at all.

This video is what made me want to take the extra challenge, to put some traditional cabinetmaking details into my box, and to make the drawer after these principals.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Here an interesting one with different types and plenty of inspiration:
http://www.daikudojo.org/Classes/toolboxes/

Best thoughts,

Mads
You always manage to find interesting things to bring to light. I enjoyed the history lesson and insight into a traditional woodworking method. Good job as always, Mads!
 

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Japanese toolbox - thoughts

Japanese toolbox
大工の道具箱

I have been looking forward for a while to make this blog, this because the result is one of my favorite woodworking projects, it was like a sum of skills leaned and also a design and history challenge that I enjoyed.
The result is something I am proud of and that I think will stay with me for as long as I live.


At first I made this small one out of trash wood in Paris, meant for chisels.

Later another as a gift for a friend http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25015 .

But after I read Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use' I knew I needed to make myself a real traditional Japanese toolbox one day.

The first part here will be my thoughts about and pictures of Japanese toolboxes.
Or in other words why I ended up with the design that I did.

So sit back and enjoy.


One of the first pictures I ran into was this one, and it did confuse me…
This does not seem to be a traditional toolbox and the tools don't seem to be Japanese…
The frame saw is used in China and Europe, the handsaw seems English!
So why do I show this picture?
To say that the research that I have been able to do is at the web and few books, this do not make a really well documented truth. Writers was perhaps not even woodworkers and even we have an old black and white photo showing someone with a saw, we can't know if this is traditional or not.
The only interesting thing I can conclude from this picture is that the toolbox even the design is different seems to be quite simple and made from cheap wood to transport tools inside.


This picture shows a standard transport box, I think Japanese, but notice the design.
My guess will be that the traditional Japanese toolbox was made this way, that the inspiration came from this.
A simple low priced, fast to make transport box.


Here a later military one, now added hardware for strength.


The inside, elegant.


So finally!
A classic example of the Japanese toolbox.
Pine for low price.
Nails for fast making.
Handles for carry.
Thin wood for light weight (low price).
The simple lid that locks without hardware (low price).
So these are my first conclusions, this because I believe you made your toolbox as young apprentice and so did not have money for something fancy, but also since the Japanese do not value things like we do, they have an approach that are more simple and yet much more sophisticated - you have to earn your status by proving you worth a tool. So a young starter will not go and buy the whole Lie Nielsen set if he had the money, he would buy his tools as needed, when needed and then upgrade as his skills improve. I believe some of us could learn quite a lot from this…


This one with a drawer.


This one I think is really classy, I like the long slim design.
Notice feet, handles with shape and that the bottom boards are sideways (not normal).


Slim and simple.


Larger, double drawers with lock.


New use…


Absolutely charming!


How can you not love this.
If you hire this guy you will know you get a fair price - not like the one in a Van full of Festool power tools…


At work.
The box is used as a holder for the planes.


Or to store them.


Much like a traditional Scandinavian as here.
Quite amazing in a way.


The closest I get to a historical proof…
But quite an interesting museum, hope one day to make savings and go to Japan.
Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum:
http://dougukan.jp/contents-en/


Here from another museum, notice the ends are jointed with a big 'finger joint'.


Not so elegant, but a good guess on how it should look today.
Screwed and nailed together, a mix of woods and plywood, fast low price and solid.
Perhaps the finger joints are a little overkill, but since it is from a school it is probably to learn.
Japanese woodworking school.
http://b-log-b-log.blog.so-net.ne.jp/archive/c2300758805-1


This might be a commercial for the green boxes, but it shows the simple and different types of toolboxes.


Back to the future…
This is where we are today - nice legs.


This might for me be a good proposal for a modern woodworker toolbox.
Lightweight, cheap, waterproof and easy to transport.
(Don't remember where I saw this, sorry).


And this is a Festool insert - in this way you get both…


But back to our friend.
Back to the traditional toolbox.


Found this beginner set on a Japanese site.
And yes it is probably all we need to get started.


Here first day at a Japanese woodworker school.


And the basic tool set.
I can almost imagine how proud the young guy must be.


And here we start, making traditional toolboxes.
Pictures from school with students and then the set and box
http://miyadaiku.hamazo.tv/c536143_6.html


The result - elegant!


And later one for plane storage.



Here my conclusion:
Low price light weight wood: pine.
Thin planed boards for low weight.
No hardware.
Size that I can easy carry.
Proportions slim for elegancy.
A drawer for small things, and for giving myself a challenge of traditional Japanese drawer making.
Finally I choose to buy a bag of bamboo nails, this to try the traditional way, for beauty and again for giving myself a challenge - this I know is not traditional at all.

This video is what made me want to take the extra challenge, to put some traditional cabinetmaking details into my box, and to make the drawer after these principals.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Here an interesting one with different types and plenty of inspiration:
http://www.daikudojo.org/Classes/toolboxes/

Best thoughts,

Mads
You lost me at the legs - nice everything in this "tool box" on heels :D
 

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20 Posts
Japanese toolbox - thoughts

Japanese toolbox
大工の道具箱

I have been looking forward for a while to make this blog, this because the result is one of my favorite woodworking projects, it was like a sum of skills leaned and also a design and history challenge that I enjoyed.
The result is something I am proud of and that I think will stay with me for as long as I live.


At first I made this small one out of trash wood in Paris, meant for chisels.

Later another as a gift for a friend http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25015 .

But after I read Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use' I knew I needed to make myself a real traditional Japanese toolbox one day.

The first part here will be my thoughts about and pictures of Japanese toolboxes.
Or in other words why I ended up with the design that I did.

So sit back and enjoy.


One of the first pictures I ran into was this one, and it did confuse me…
This does not seem to be a traditional toolbox and the tools don't seem to be Japanese…
The frame saw is used in China and Europe, the handsaw seems English!
So why do I show this picture?
To say that the research that I have been able to do is at the web and few books, this do not make a really well documented truth. Writers was perhaps not even woodworkers and even we have an old black and white photo showing someone with a saw, we can't know if this is traditional or not.
The only interesting thing I can conclude from this picture is that the toolbox even the design is different seems to be quite simple and made from cheap wood to transport tools inside.


This picture shows a standard transport box, I think Japanese, but notice the design.
My guess will be that the traditional Japanese toolbox was made this way, that the inspiration came from this.
A simple low priced, fast to make transport box.


Here a later military one, now added hardware for strength.


The inside, elegant.


So finally!
A classic example of the Japanese toolbox.
Pine for low price.
Nails for fast making.
Handles for carry.
Thin wood for light weight (low price).
The simple lid that locks without hardware (low price).
So these are my first conclusions, this because I believe you made your toolbox as young apprentice and so did not have money for something fancy, but also since the Japanese do not value things like we do, they have an approach that are more simple and yet much more sophisticated - you have to earn your status by proving you worth a tool. So a young starter will not go and buy the whole Lie Nielsen set if he had the money, he would buy his tools as needed, when needed and then upgrade as his skills improve. I believe some of us could learn quite a lot from this…


This one with a drawer.


This one I think is really classy, I like the long slim design.
Notice feet, handles with shape and that the bottom boards are sideways (not normal).


Slim and simple.


Larger, double drawers with lock.


New use…


Absolutely charming!


How can you not love this.
If you hire this guy you will know you get a fair price - not like the one in a Van full of Festool power tools…


At work.
The box is used as a holder for the planes.


Or to store them.


Much like a traditional Scandinavian as here.
Quite amazing in a way.


The closest I get to a historical proof…
But quite an interesting museum, hope one day to make savings and go to Japan.
Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum:
http://dougukan.jp/contents-en/


Here from another museum, notice the ends are jointed with a big 'finger joint'.


Not so elegant, but a good guess on how it should look today.
Screwed and nailed together, a mix of woods and plywood, fast low price and solid.
Perhaps the finger joints are a little overkill, but since it is from a school it is probably to learn.
Japanese woodworking school.
http://b-log-b-log.blog.so-net.ne.jp/archive/c2300758805-1


This might be a commercial for the green boxes, but it shows the simple and different types of toolboxes.


Back to the future…
This is where we are today - nice legs.


This might for me be a good proposal for a modern woodworker toolbox.
Lightweight, cheap, waterproof and easy to transport.
(Don't remember where I saw this, sorry).


And this is a Festool insert - in this way you get both…


But back to our friend.
Back to the traditional toolbox.


Found this beginner set on a Japanese site.
And yes it is probably all we need to get started.


Here first day at a Japanese woodworker school.


And the basic tool set.
I can almost imagine how proud the young guy must be.


And here we start, making traditional toolboxes.
Pictures from school with students and then the set and box
http://miyadaiku.hamazo.tv/c536143_6.html


The result - elegant!


And later one for plane storage.



Here my conclusion:
Low price light weight wood: pine.
Thin planed boards for low weight.
No hardware.
Size that I can easy carry.
Proportions slim for elegancy.
A drawer for small things, and for giving myself a challenge of traditional Japanese drawer making.
Finally I choose to buy a bag of bamboo nails, this to try the traditional way, for beauty and again for giving myself a challenge - this I know is not traditional at all.

This video is what made me want to take the extra challenge, to put some traditional cabinetmaking details into my box, and to make the drawer after these principals.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Here an interesting one with different types and plenty of inspiration:
http://www.daikudojo.org/Classes/toolboxes/

Best thoughts,

Mads
Japanese toolboxes and work methods is new to me, this was very inspiring. made me interested . I think I´m going to make a japanese toolbox this summer .
Thanks
 

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Japanese toolbox - thoughts

Japanese toolbox
大工の道具箱

I have been looking forward for a while to make this blog, this because the result is one of my favorite woodworking projects, it was like a sum of skills leaned and also a design and history challenge that I enjoyed.
The result is something I am proud of and that I think will stay with me for as long as I live.


At first I made this small one out of trash wood in Paris, meant for chisels.

Later another as a gift for a friend http://lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/25015 .

But after I read Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use' I knew I needed to make myself a real traditional Japanese toolbox one day.

The first part here will be my thoughts about and pictures of Japanese toolboxes.
Or in other words why I ended up with the design that I did.

So sit back and enjoy.


One of the first pictures I ran into was this one, and it did confuse me…
This does not seem to be a traditional toolbox and the tools don't seem to be Japanese…
The frame saw is used in China and Europe, the handsaw seems English!
So why do I show this picture?
To say that the research that I have been able to do is at the web and few books, this do not make a really well documented truth. Writers was perhaps not even woodworkers and even we have an old black and white photo showing someone with a saw, we can't know if this is traditional or not.
The only interesting thing I can conclude from this picture is that the toolbox even the design is different seems to be quite simple and made from cheap wood to transport tools inside.


This picture shows a standard transport box, I think Japanese, but notice the design.
My guess will be that the traditional Japanese toolbox was made this way, that the inspiration came from this.
A simple low priced, fast to make transport box.


Here a later military one, now added hardware for strength.


The inside, elegant.


So finally!
A classic example of the Japanese toolbox.
Pine for low price.
Nails for fast making.
Handles for carry.
Thin wood for light weight (low price).
The simple lid that locks without hardware (low price).
So these are my first conclusions, this because I believe you made your toolbox as young apprentice and so did not have money for something fancy, but also since the Japanese do not value things like we do, they have an approach that are more simple and yet much more sophisticated - you have to earn your status by proving you worth a tool. So a young starter will not go and buy the whole Lie Nielsen set if he had the money, he would buy his tools as needed, when needed and then upgrade as his skills improve. I believe some of us could learn quite a lot from this…


This one with a drawer.


This one I think is really classy, I like the long slim design.
Notice feet, handles with shape and that the bottom boards are sideways (not normal).


Slim and simple.


Larger, double drawers with lock.


New use…


Absolutely charming!


How can you not love this.
If you hire this guy you will know you get a fair price - not like the one in a Van full of Festool power tools…


At work.
The box is used as a holder for the planes.


Or to store them.


Much like a traditional Scandinavian as here.
Quite amazing in a way.


The closest I get to a historical proof…
But quite an interesting museum, hope one day to make savings and go to Japan.
Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum:
http://dougukan.jp/contents-en/


Here from another museum, notice the ends are jointed with a big 'finger joint'.


Not so elegant, but a good guess on how it should look today.
Screwed and nailed together, a mix of woods and plywood, fast low price and solid.
Perhaps the finger joints are a little overkill, but since it is from a school it is probably to learn.
Japanese woodworking school.
http://b-log-b-log.blog.so-net.ne.jp/archive/c2300758805-1


This might be a commercial for the green boxes, but it shows the simple and different types of toolboxes.


Back to the future…
This is where we are today - nice legs.


This might for me be a good proposal for a modern woodworker toolbox.
Lightweight, cheap, waterproof and easy to transport.
(Don't remember where I saw this, sorry).


And this is a Festool insert - in this way you get both…


But back to our friend.
Back to the traditional toolbox.


Found this beginner set on a Japanese site.
And yes it is probably all we need to get started.


Here first day at a Japanese woodworker school.


And the basic tool set.
I can almost imagine how proud the young guy must be.


And here we start, making traditional toolboxes.
Pictures from school with students and then the set and box
http://miyadaiku.hamazo.tv/c536143_6.html


The result - elegant!


And later one for plane storage.



Here my conclusion:
Low price light weight wood: pine.
Thin planed boards for low weight.
No hardware.
Size that I can easy carry.
Proportions slim for elegancy.
A drawer for small things, and for giving myself a challenge of traditional Japanese drawer making.
Finally I choose to buy a bag of bamboo nails, this to try the traditional way, for beauty and again for giving myself a challenge - this I know is not traditional at all.

This video is what made me want to take the extra challenge, to put some traditional cabinetmaking details into my box, and to make the drawer after these principals.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Here an interesting one with different types and plenty of inspiration:
http://www.daikudojo.org/Classes/toolboxes/

Best thoughts,

Mads
a cool read.. thanks.
 
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