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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Mads,

Great to see you've gone down the road of the deshi. I was moving away from the Japanese tools but now I'm having second thoughts.

Next time you use the beam you should dress more like Odate-san here
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m17hcb5b491rrjg3go1_1280.jpg
 

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304 Posts
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Did you notice the planing beam next to the wall on the left side of the photo?
 

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Registered
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28,289 Posts
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Hi Mads, glad to see you back at woodworking! that is a very nice traditionally made bench. You area true craftmsna and have a sweet collection of hand planes to do the job! A true rhykenologist, my friend!!
...................Cheers, Jim
 

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Registered
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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Good work Mads. I admire the Japanese hand woodworking methods and tools. Very minimalistic, but effective. I also like the respect they have for their tools and their work, much like yourself.
 

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Registered
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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
I most say its looking better in the live version ….. maybee have something to do
with the quantum of Mads´s coffee inbord :)

thanks for sharing the build Mads enjoyd them :)

take care
Dennis
 

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Registered
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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
I truly admire your resolve to try new things. I also admire the art of Japanese woodworking! I don't know if I am nibble enough to do it, but it looks awesome! Thank you for sharing.

Very Respectfully,

Nate
 

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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Way to go Mads! I like it.
 
Joined
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13,555 Posts
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Looks good, mad.
 

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Registered
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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
I really like the shooting board stand….any thoughts on making it longer to use for shooting edges while they lay on their face?
 

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Discussion Starter · #190 ·
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Hi there,
Thank you all for the comments.

RG, sweet idea.

Beginning, you too!

Dr. Ken, smiles here.

Nate, basically I'm just a big child, but I see on your floor you know that feeling.

Dennis, ;-) yes you have seen it live.

Mike, minimalistic I guess that is also what facinate me the most about it.

Jim, yes I have passed the houndred planes Dennis counted last time he visited so I am a mad Ryno no doubt. Now I wonder if I one day will start selling or if I will keep the love for all of them in each their way.

Tex, yes I did, and I am going to make me one also, just did not meet the right piece of wood.

meikou, dress… I just bought a beautiful old Kimono perhaps I should use it for woodworking…

Paul, Odates book is amazing, it was really got me hooked, that man is so amazing to listen to.
domo arigato gozaimasu = thank you

Sam, ;-)

Lew, I have a feeling you will wait a long time then…

Doug, no hurry, I am also just begining and see the rad as never ending.

Ray, yes we need to keep the body fit to sit, but quite fast the body will adapt, perhaps if we carry too many extra kilos we need a little food change also, smiles.

Andy, I will show you leg wise later. I have posted on the thread now.

Steve, nothing like shaves.

JJW, smiles here.

david, this one was made before the move, the pictures from my old workshop and garden. Like some of the following posts in this series.

Best thoughts to all of you,
Mads
 

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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Do itashimashita, Mads-san. (you're welcome)

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #192 ·
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads

A little video.
Smiles,
MaFe
 

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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Your shop makes me smile. Thanks for sharing Mads. I look forward to seeing that toolchest you are working on. The theme seems to be "simplicity"....we could all use more of that in our lives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #194 ·
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Smiles RG, hope you are full in your heart.
Best thoughts buddy,
Mads
 

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Registered
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Discussion Starter · #195 ·
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
 

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Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Awesome blog post Mads! I just stumbled on this today when I was thinking on making a small planing bench in my basement so I might be able to work on my planing skill during the winter - when it's too cold to work in my non heated garage shop!

-Becky
 

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Discussion Starter · #197 ·
Japanese planing board / Japanese workbench

Japanese planing board
Japanese workbench

Ok as promised I will continue the Japanese blog series.
It all started by me reading Toshio Odate's book 'Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use', and now since I have moved to a new location where I at least for a while will have no workshop, the story will continue since I plan on using Japanese tools and methods in the meantime.

Get started MaFe.

So to work with my Japanese tools, I needed Japanese 'set up', a bench… hmmmm… they did not use workbenches… ok what then? A beam, some horses and a planing board!

Before I start I have to admit this blog is not as detailed as usual, I simply enjoyed my time so much that I forgot to take photos, but I will try to tell what has happened and how it was made so it will be possible to build one if wanted (please forgive me).


So this is where it started, as often before a drawing - this time with a little watercolor also.
I had a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob), so I decided to keep the shape of the rafter as a memory and thought it will give a little 'edge' to the design.


We step right in where I check the board's flatness with a set of winding sticks, after I have cut the rafter to length, made two legs that are mounted with sliding dovetails.
The legs keep the board of the ground and it adds stability to the board.
(If you have a really thick board / beam you do not need the legs).


Then I marked the high spots, and started a work out with a scrub plane (Scandinavian model).
Since the board was not straight at all it really needed some work, but it was good exorcise for me.


The longest plane I have is a no.8 Stanley, so it was put to service for the next phase of making the board dead flat and straight and once it took shaves at every spot it was time to move on.


Now finally for Japanese plane to smooth up the surface.
I ran it skewed to the wood and made the shaves thinner and thinner as I went.


Here the three planes and their shaves.
Scandinavian, American, Japanese union.


Next I wanted a 90 degree angel in the one end to make a shooting board function in this narrow end.
More of this later.


And marked up with my line.
(This time I was trying some new black color powder that was used in the old days by boat builders but showed up to be a disaster… it stuck to everything and I even needed to sand down my table after… learning by doing).


At the wide end of the board I just wanted a planing stop that also should be mounted in a sliding dovetail so it can be easily removed and changed.


Here is the idea, a stop and a bar mounted on the side of the board to make a shooting board function.
Perhaps foolish to mix but I want to try…


This is the idea.
(And the fast viewer will see something is wrong…).

From this point I forgot to take photos again, but to make the sliding dovetails you can either just cut them with your Japanese saw, plane them out, use a router or like I did a table saw and a plunge cut saw on rails.
.


So here we are, the first shaves made on the board.


Yes I took it to the garden.
To smell nature and wood mix.
And used now my Sumitsubo for marking lines with ink and no more ancient powder…


From another view (snail cam).


And here MaFe making shaves with the Japanese sun behind.


Long beautiful shaves.


The stop works excellent.


The shooting board function is fine too - but…
I made it for push action and not for pull like the Japanese planes am used…
Tough luck MaFe.


But it works fine, and for the little I use it I'm sure it will do for now.


Straight end!


This is it.


I think it is a simple yet effective and beautiful workbench and I'm sure it will serve me well.


Need I say more?


In fact I found it so beautiful that it moved into my living room.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.



Here videos to inspire, in this you will see an old Japanese carpenter using traditional methods and tools and the board in use.

Links:

Japanese using a planing board:

Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false

Best thoughts,

Mads
Thank you Becky,
I love it, it is useful for so many tasks and I find it beautiful too.

In the new shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #198 ·
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
 

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Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
As always, Mads, a very well thought out picture essay of your project.
 

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Registered
Joined
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304 Posts
Japanese saw horses - floor horses (blog)

Japanese saw horses
floor horses

This time low saw horses, these are for Japanese woodworking, and so they are meant to keep the items in good position for sitting work and for bend, standing jobs like rip cut with a Japanese saw.



Once more a roof rafter that a friend gave me nice thick wood and wide also, the same as I used for my shaving horse (thank you Jakob).
First step is to mark up careful with pen and Sashigane (Japanese square).
And do not forget a cold beer….


Now since I don't have any saw horses I use my power tools (perhaps also I was lazy or tired but do not tell that to the rest of LJ…).
(Some can see I also work on a different Japanese project at that time, but we will get back to that - others notice something for smoking).


Then I clean up the beams, since they need to get the final size.


Before and after Japanese plane.


Some ornamentation is tradition on the feet.


Now drill a hole all the way through.


Some more drawing and adding the size of the beams now.


Two cuts with a Japanese saw and some clean up - do not ask why I used English chisels and not Japanese…


Mark carefully what leg belongs where for perfect fit.


Do you get the idea?


Then drill from the bottom down through the beams, app half way or so.
(The detail will come later).


Ok I was lazy…


And cleaned up again.


To make the feet stand good on the floor without rocking we need some shape to give them more points to stand on.
This I did by clamping them together and drill two round holes, half to each side.
(Notice the beautiful Japanese clamps).


Shaping the shoulders.
Of course it could have been done by hand.


Getting closer.


Help…


Clean up.


More clean up, this time planing the faces of the feet.
(Sounds kind of stupid… faces of feet… feet's have toes, not faces!).


Making some dowels for the feet.
This will make the feet and beams connect really strong.


Glue them in.
I rounded then a little so they are easier to stick into the beam after.


I also drilled a hole and added a bamboo stick through to secure the dowel.


And cut it of flush.


Finally some visual permanent marks to pare the feet and beams.


Here we are Japanese saw horses.

Hope this blog can bring some inspiration to others that play with Japanese tools and work methods.

I want to send a special warm thought to Toshio Odate, thank you for inspire ring me with your book, but most of all my sister who offered me my Japanese chisels and a Kanna that was the reason why this interest started.

Links:
Tools from Japan: http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store/index.php?main_page=page&id=9&chapter=5
Popular science 1967: http://books.google.com/books?id=CSEDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA138&lpg=PA138&dq=holding+a+japanese+kanna&source=bl&ots=RmhOU8AEM3&sig=lwDdDHI-nKp3JZVTI438ToM8cFI&hl=da&ei=q-0xTsnZIoKh-QblkJiXDQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CGwQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=holding%20a%20japanese%20kanna&f=false
Jims version of the horses: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/68231 with stops.

Best thoughts,

Mads
Very nice project. When I figure out if I could use them with my bad back I'm gonna make me some of these.
 
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