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Hey guys, I'm new here, and basically created this account for this reason alone. I want some help to identify some hand planes owned by my Great-Grandfather. Well, less identify and more categorize and give me a range of when they were bought and used. For what reason you ask? Why, my good sir, I shall tell you. I'm a young aspiring woodworker who comes from a family of working class men, and I felt this would be an appropriate route. Anyways, here they are.
Wood Font Art Pattern Carmine

I'm really sorry if that inconveniences you, with the link and all. At least if it ends up like that. (Like I said, new at this) If not, continue.
The Number 4
Tool Wood Hand tool Rebate plane Trigger

The Number 40
Font Carmine Visual arts Metal Wood

Now I don't claim to be a professional photographer, but I hope these pictures will get the point across
Details of the #40
Banknote Font Material property Publication Currency

Wood Gas Bumper Automotive exterior Tints and shades

Currency Money Cash Wood Money handling

Details of the #4
Wood Font Paper Paper product

Wood Musical instrument accessory Wood stain Gas Hardwood

Wood Auto part Metal Ceiling Circle

(If you can't read this one, it says No. 4 on top and Bailey on bottom
Wood Gas Circle Metal Artifact

Patent dates
Artifact Art Font Sculpture Concrete

Alright, that's all I've got for now. Ask for more detail if you can use it, I can take pictures of specific parts, follow your instructions whatever it needs. My goal here is to fully restore these two, wether it be for my own pride or for general use. However, I would also like to know if it makes sense to restore these, and if they'll be suitable for use after I inevitably mess something up.
In conclusion: I would like to know when they were made, how useful it would be for me to restore them (No, not to sell, these are my inheritance as far as I'm concerned), and how to restore them if the former is wise. Any links or recommendations of good sources will be appreciated. Thank you for at least reading this far, and considering my request. Hopefully you're a plane aficionado with extra time on his hands ;).
 

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One is a scrub plane (No. 40)

The other looks like an early No. 4 because of the patent dates, but also because it doesn't have an adjustable frog.
I had a grooved bottom No. 4 exactly like this an it was a decent plane once I tuned it up.

Try this site for more exact identification.
This is also a good site for "all things Stanley".

I would say due to the provenance and attachment you have, you should restore the planes to their "former glory".
They will both be users, however you will find as your skills increase, having and adjustable frog is a big advantage.

Good Luck.
 

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I think the #4 does have an adjustable frog, it's visible in a couple of the pics.

Nic, you've got a great pair of planes to work with. Lots of resources on line to advise you on refurb, from cleaning to total repainting and shining. And it's up to you how much you want to do with these tools. For my .02, I'd suggest a can of WD-40 and a stiff brush, along with some rags and elbow grease, as a first step. Learn how to take these apart and re-assemble, and clean everything. I personally wouldn't be concerned with shine, just get the muck gone. Then sharpen the irons and go to town.

There are a bunch of #5 jack planes on the market that are in the same era as your tools; a jack with help complete the set, along with a longer jointer (#7 or #8). At that point you'd have a great working collection of g-grandpa-era hand tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You don't need to worry about me learning to take them apart, I've already done it peobably a few more times than I should have ;). Thanks for the response, I'll be checking those sources.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Small update: the No. 4 is a 1910-1918 model, and the No. 40 is a lot harder to date, so for now I'm just gonna roll ahead with restoration. Currently researching the proper way to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alright, what does the adjustable frog thing mean exactly? I apologize for my obliviousness, but the frog is held down by two bolts from the top that fit into elongated holes, and in the back bottom side of the bed theres an adjustment screw that pushes the whole frog forward or back. I feel as if I'm still dating this wrong, somehow.
 

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I thinks it's a type 12. I picked a #5 type 11 on Saturday and the only difference, from the chart, is that the type 12 has a larger (1-1/2") depth adjustment nut.

Not to mention I think I see a heart on the iron. type 12 was the start of the sweetheart era and are supposed to be the peak of quality for Stanley plane. Or something like that. Very desirable plane at least. Clean the top of the iron and measure the depth adjuster and it will tell you all you need to know. Pretty sure.
 

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I would agree with type 11. It has the low knob and looks like a small adjusting nut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The diameter of the nut is around 3/4-1" if I remember right. I could only wish for a Sweetheart. Besides, it does have the bailey marking on the front of the bed, if that happens to make any difference.
 

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Anyways, I m currently putting all the little bolts on a rust removal spray and seeing where that takes me. How should I remove the tarnish on the brass?

- NicHartman
Vinegar or Brasso and a soft cloth is the best and least damaging. I generally soak the brass in vinegar overnight, use a nylon brush to get off any dirt/crud that has softened up and then Brasso after that. I will also sometimes use a brass brush in a dremel on low speed to get into the corners. A steel wire brush or wheel can damage the brass if you aren't careful.
 
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