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- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
 

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Registered
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3,279 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Wow I am definitely intrigued
 

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14,500 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Very nice work.
 

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- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Looks great, you obviously have some patience. Did you figure out what you were going to do for drawing classes?
 

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13,709 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
WOW! It is amazing to watch the face appear from the wood!

Lew
 

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9,248 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Thank you for documenting all of this! You really put a lot of work into taking all the step by step pictures and I am sure that many people besides myself really are going to appreciate it. Your carving is really coming out nicely. It is also nice to read your thoughts throughout the process. This is a great project and a joy to follow. Thanks for sharing it with us!

Sheila
 

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11,233 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
W O W !

You have done one hellava GREAT job on that face!

Reminded me of how werewolves changed on the movie screen!

I see what you meant when you said you lost the drawing when you cut it away… & have to get it back!
... or do the best you could to get it back… TRICKY…!!

Now, I guess the Flames around the face makes it a Sun… LOL… and not get confused with a Moon… LOL,,,

Very GOOD!

Thank you for sharing and taking all of those pictures, etc,!
 

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- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
wow, quite impressive!
 

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7,426 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Looking good!!
 

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13,760 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
well charles

i am very impressed

not only have you persisted in your carving

but you have gotten better at it

the difference is that cnc work
can be 'symmetrical' if desired

but character comes from the art
and it like life
is never exact
(well at least till it has happened)

great work
thanks for the journey
 

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397 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Wow! I really like it.
I am just starting to carve and hope to be able to do something like this.
 

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7,866 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
hey there charles, im so proud of you and your journey to take on your self taught carving, your doing such a wonderful job and it looks terrific…..cant wait to see this finished, keep at if my friend, your going to become a great carver…
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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25,676 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Nice job and blog Charles.
 

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1,140 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Great job, keep on with the carvings!!! Thanks for all of the pics.
 

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Registered
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2,604 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
That is a heck of a job there. Very nice to see the progression in steps. Keep going!
 

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55 Posts
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
nice work!
 

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- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Man, I'm exhausted watching your progress on this. How much time do you have in on this piece?? If I tried something like this I would be afraid all along the way that I would screw something up. You did a great job. I will be looking to see how you apply a finish to this. Without a doubt, one of the hardest things for anyone to do in drawing or carving is the eyes. You came thru quite well…...........
 

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- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
Helluvawreck, you are definitely coming along great, I joined a Monday evening carving club and am making some
progress, would make more if I did not keep getting distracted by whatever I wander across, but I am having
fun and do not have any deadlines, except the final one and I am trying to miss it. I can see that I am going to
have to make some carving gouges, why buy them when I can waste more time and money making them and
they may even work. Thank you for sharing your work and lessons with us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
- Carving the Smaller Sun

About 4 weeks ago I carved this sun. It is a pattern by Lora S. Irish from her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I really do like the patterns in this book.



After cutting and sanding the basswood blank I attached the pattern and carbon paper and carefully traced the pattern by hand.



As you can see this basswood is somewhat grainy. I didn't think that it would matter that much.



I began carving by outlining the inner wall of the circle and outline of the nose with a v-tool.



Since the nose would be the most prominent part of the face I started to remove wood from the rest of the face with a gouge.



And then smoothing the surface with a number 3 gouge which is less shallow than the first gouge.



I took another pattern that I had copied and piece of carbon paper and cut along the inner line of the circle around the face and also around the nose so that I could locate the eye sockets.



After they were located I began carving the outline of the eye sockets with a small number 11 gouge.



And got the outline of them both to approximately the same depth after which I rounded the whole area inside the eye sockets over and smoothed them up. He sort of looks like he has glasses on at this point.



I drew in the left eye as best as I could and then carved it. I missed a few pictures here because of concentrating on the eye. I also began rounding over the forehead and eyebrow ridge.



I then copied the right eye from the left eye with a pencil in order to try to keep them as symmetrical as I was able to even though I knew they wouldn't be exact.



After this I began shaping the cheeks and thinning them up a bit.



And I also began shaping the mouth.



And I also worked on the chin and joules a little.



I thought that everything was coming along ok at this point but I wanted to try something a little different than the way I did the left eye.



I decided to round over the whole eye mound before drawing the right eye and before I carved it. I thought that this would make the eye look better even though I knew it would make each eye a little more different than the other. But I'm learning and like to experiment while I'm carving.



After rounding it over and thinning it up I could see that this would work better for me.



I used a ruler to help me make three strategic marks for the right eyelid. This would help in drawing it by hand.



Using the dots and observing the left eye I drew in the right eye lid trying to keep them symmetrical.



Then, after drwing in the rest of the right eye I could carve the right eye lid by also observing the left.



The symmetry is not perfect but reasonably so - at least for me. I have a lot to learn.



And I carved the top of the lower lid and began rounding over the whole eye ball.



Of course while I'm working on any detail sometimes my eyes are distracted to other parts of the face so everything is in a state of flux.



I get off of the eyes for a while and began shaping the cheeks some more and thinning them a bit.



I also round the mouth a little.



The upper cheeks are shaped a little more and blended in a little to the lower eyelid area.



I can then proceed to work on the lips.



I carve the pupils and iris' of the eyes and carve the outer perimeter of the face circle.



And round over the circle which is similar to a bead.



The last detail of the face is the forehead wrinkles.



I drilled some relief holes for the scroll saw blade and sawed out the rays on the scroll saw.



This is the first time that I have used my scroll saw in many months. I'm becoming to realize that it will be an important tool for me in the future.



Now I can try to put a pattern into the rays that will maybe simulate fire.



A few more touch ups and details.



This is where I have temporarily stopped. I need to do some more clean up work but this sun is close to being done. Before I finish this one I have gotten some better ideas about how to do the next sun so I may digress to that before cleaning this one up. The next part of this blog is a bigger sun with a few modifications.

I hope that you will stay tuned. And thanks for looking.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
I'm sorry I haven't gotten back to you folks but we had a death in the family. It was one of my brothers in law. He was shot accidently while cleaning his gun so it was unexpected.

Rustic and Wayne, I really do appreciate the compliments.

Thanks, Steve. I have purchased some drawing equipment and also a good basic set of art supplies for acrylic painting. I also purchased a nice small computer desk to do my painting and drawing on and it is set up next to my computer so I can watch lessons on my computer and or paint or draw. I did a little painting yesterday and I hope I can find the time to do it on a regular basis without interfering with my woodworking and woodcarving.

Lew, I appreciate it, thanks.

Sheila, thanks for the kind words. I know I'm just learning and am certainly no teacher but somehow I think that some people might like to see the carving as it developed. I hope it doesn't bore anyone.

Joe, Flipper, and Larry, I appreciate very much your comments and compliments.

Thanks, David. I shoot for symmetry because I know that we should but will not achieve it and I agree that that is part of the charm of something made by hand. It's not going to be perfect although some can come very close.

Chuck, Grizz, and Topa, I appreciate your fine words of encouragement and when someone like me is trying to learn how to do something it really helps so thanks.

JJ, Bearpie, and mainerustic, I appreciate the kind words.

Redryder and Bluepine, I appreciate your words also because all words of encouragement help us keep on trying to improve ourselves even when things are going slow.

Bluepine, I get extracted too so I know what you mean. I'm looking forward to some blogs of your toolmaking so please post them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
- Carving the Larger Sun

This sun was carved from a pattern by the wonderful artist and woodcarver, Lora S. Irish and is in her book, 101 Artistic Relief Patterns for Woodcarvers, Woodburners & Crafters. I love her patterns and this book is a favorite of mine.

The first part of the blog was carving the little sun. However, before I got through carving the little sun I made up my mind that it wasn't large enough or deep enough so I decided I would carve another one that was larger and deeper and also use some of the knowledge and skill I had gained during the carving of the first. After I started I was so into what I was doing that I forgot to take any pictures so we will have to begin at the first photograph. As you can see I have gotten it to the point at which we have the beginnings of a face.



The blank that I started with is almost 12 inches by 12 inches and 1-3/16 inches thick so the features will be much deeper and will have over 4 times the surface area.



I wanted the nose to be more prominent and the eyes to be more deeply set. I also begin to carve in the mouth.



I have rounded over the eye sockets and smoothed them with a number 3 gouge prior to drawing in the eyes. The next few photographs show the steps taken to carve the eyes. Naturally I try to get the eyes symmetrical but know I will not get them exactly so.













Leaving the eyes I have begun working on the cheeks and the mouth.



I also began on the outer circumference of the face ring. The ring will be deeper as well.



It may not show up from the photo but my idea here is to carve down from the outer perimeter of the piece of wood down into a stop cut around the outer perimeter of the ring. It will actually drop about 3/8 of an inch. While I do so I will try to leave gouge marks that look somewhat like flames as the light dances over the valleys and peaks of the gouge marks.



The gouge pattern is radial at this point but I will make many random cuts because that is the nature of fire. It is quite random you know? I am one who can look deeply into a fire and imagine all sorts of things going on there in the fire. You are liable to imagine yourself seeing all sorts of things. To view a fire is quite frightening if you look into it quite deeply but as long as we keep them contained then they become our servant and they give us warmth and actually become our companions and friends. You will know these things for sure when you are in the deep woods on a cold night in front of your dear companion, the fire.



I deepen the face.



The color of the basswood under the light reminds me of the flames of a fire or the rays of the sun who is also our companion.



You can see the depth of the ring.



So now I am beginning to round over the ring.



So the sun now has his ring for the most part. It is as though the sun has a great port hole to look down upon the face of the earth. To me he has the expression that says "I have seen it all; there is nothing new under the sun."



I took a copy of my pattern and cut out the ring and face in order to transfer the rays to the wood with graphite paper.



So we see sort of what the rays will look like.



I drill small holes in strategic places to relieve the scroll saw.



Then I cut the rays out with the scroll saw.



So finally the sun has a halo of flames.



Of course while doing all of these steps I continue to try to improve all os the features of the sun's face.



























The sun's appearance after I finished carving.





The two shots above is how the sun looked after I sprayed a coat of polyurethane on.



This is a shot of how I work and my setup. It's really quite messy isn't it? I wish that I were better organized. I never will be. My wife sometimes calls me Pigpen.

I enjoyed carving the sun and I appreciate you folks visiting my blog.

helluvawreck
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com/
 
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