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Given the continuous grain on the lid I wonder if it is a steam bent lid? My concern with carving the lid with a router bowl bit is that the vertical part of the lid would be very weak.
 

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I think you have it also. I would get rid of a lot of the waste with the table saw. Removing that much wood from one side of the board, may cause it to want it to move a little. I wonder if the lid part might want to be left a little thick, just in case it curls a bit, you could still face plane to flatten.

best wishes
Lynn
 

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I would first remove as much as possible with the tablesaw before cutting the final radius on the router table. The dish cutter bit looks like the way to go if the radius you are trying to achieve is the same as that of your bit.
 

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I can't tell the dimensions from the pics, but if that ridge is very high you would need a really long shaft on the router bit. I also wonder about supporting the piece while you work it.

Perhaps the rough shape was made by a series of rip cuts on the table saw with increasing depth to match the curve followed by hand scraping. That would give you good support during the machining. It appears that the handle is centered on the lid so you could make one cut, rotate the piece to cut the other side, raise the blade, adjust the fence, and repeat until you had the maximum depth. Then the waste could be cut off the face of the lid.

I imagine that you could take a card scraper and grind it to the desired curve profile, sharpen it, and then have the smooth curve in no time.
 

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Thx for updated pic. I'd dado out most of material on one side in a series of passes. With the last pass on the handle side leave enough material for the curve to be shaped in. Then double tape stick a runner to same thickness of stock on the side with waste removed. Start dadoing out the waste on other side ( again leaving enough wood to accommodate the curve). You can Affix a similar runner on that side for stability. For the curve I agree with prior poster that length of shaft on bowl bit will limit how high you can go with the lid detail. A card scraper with a radius may be the way to go if you don't have enough bit.
 

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I think we are on the same train of thought here. However, by starting in the middle as I suggested you can rough out the curve on both sides without the need to fasten a runner for support. Then the remainder of the wood can be cut off leaving two nice pieces for other use. If that cut would be too deep for the maximum height on the tabesaw it could be started with the power tool and finished by hand. Turning so much good stock into sawdust by dadoing it away seems a shame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Kazooman,

Yes, it seems that if I had a longer shaft bit I'd be in good shape, but most that I see have about a 1 1/4 length, so I might just be out of luck. The size of the lid is approx. 5" x 12". Not sure if I can find a bit that will work :(

 

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If you have a bandsaw of sufficient height capacity, you could easily cut those coves while holding the wood vertically. The resulting rough cut would be easy to scrape/sand smooth. The ends would need to be perfectly square to give you the needed stability.
 
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