LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
This is my first post - before I start, I wanted to thank everyone for the great knowledge here. I just joined, but I've been pillaging this place for information for about 6 months ;)

My wife and I recently bought a house and are redoing our kitchen. I'm doing a plank style countertop for the island. I've pulled a lot of good info from this site re: table layup, and it went great. Now, however, I've hit an issue. It's a 8/4 pine layup, approx 96×48. We're finishing with minwax dark walnut and waterlox. I did a test layup and the finishing process went surprisingly smoothly - sand 100, 120, 150, minwax wood conditioner, 3 coats of minwax dark walnut, 6 coats of waterlox. Looks great.

For the final countertop, I am having HUGE issues with getting the sides to take stain evenly. I've since researched minwax wood conditioner some more and realize it's not the 'preferred' product, but it's what i used. The top looks great. The end grain is a bit blotchy, but I know that's almost unavoidable with pine. More of an issue, the sides on the 96" length are simply not taking stain. I put it on, let it sit about 15 minutes, and it just wipes right off. They took a little from the first application, but are substantially lighter than the top - it's an oak side with a dark walnut top.

I'm not sure if it's because the wood conditioner soaked in improperly, somehow, or if I over-sanded the edges to polish the routed edge profile. The wood does feel a bit "polished".

So - does anyone have any recommendations on how to address this? Specifically, the 96" length that won't take stain - should I just sand it down to bare wood with 60 grit? Should I apply mineral spirits first, will that help pull some of the conditioner out?

Thanks for any help.

Photos: the top has two coats of dark walnut, the edge has 4! And it's still 5 shades lighter.

"edge grain - 96 length - biggest problem.

also here- the flash throws off the contrast a bit, but you get the idea.

end grain- the wife actually likes it, but any suggestions are welcome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,875 Posts
For end grain or general uneven stain:

Acrylic model paints can be dry brushed to create
a faux effect. It's a useful technique if you don't
want to go to heroic measures to win with
staining pine, which is a tricky wood to stain
evenly as you've found.

There's no reason the edge grain should not take
the stain similarly to the face grain. There's
something weird up with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
I believe you already guessed it. I think you over-sanded with too fine a grit. I've done this on purpose on end grain so it will take less stain and come out about about as dark as the long grain. I would just sand it with 120 and put some stain on a spot to test.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top