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Hello all. I haven't been on for awhile. I have a tablesaw question:

I recently purchased the Freud box cutter set, and was planning to try and set up my son's benchtop model to use as a dedicated box joint unit, just to save having to always change the setup on my full size saw every time my sons or I need to do some small box joints for small keepsake boxes and the like.

When I started looking at the height adjustment procedure, I discovered that on this el cheapo unit, height adjustment is accomplished by the shaft on the adjusting knob just pushing against a tab at the bottom of the motor. The motor is on a swivel, which tilts the motor and blade higher or lower in the cabinet.

It looks like the only thing that keeps the from rising is the weight of the motor and its assembly. I can reach under the motor and actually raise the blade height by pushing up on the bottom of the motor with my hand. It seems that this could cause the blade to rise and fall during a dado cut, depending on the hardness of the wood, or the teeth coming in contact with the grain in something like oak or maple.

Are all table saws dependent on the weight of the motor assembly to keep the blade height from increasing due to resistance, or do better saws have a positive stop for the upper movement of the blade? Thanks for any ideas. Jim
 

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Are all table saws dependent on the weight of the motor assembly to keep the blade height from increasing due to resistance, or do better saws have a positive stop for the upper movement of the blade? Thanks for any ideas. Jim

- jimhester
No, the only ones that fall in that category are some of the inexpensive portable jobsite/benchtop saws like your son's, where the main consideration is low manufacturing costs. Even a better quality jobsite saw is going to have positive engagement of some kind on the depth adjustment, which solidly locks in the blade height.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks to all for your responses. I don't know what I'll end up doing. I don't really want to buy another saw, since this is for a dedicated box joint operation. I was looking at the underside, and it looks like there's a possibility that once I get the height where I want it, I can c-clamp in place. They'll all be 3/8" joints, and that height setting shouldn't ever have to be changed.

The worst case is that I'll just have to change the setup on my main saw every time I need to perform that operation. I was going to set this dedicated operation up to avoid having to tweak the height adjustment and change blades every time, but I make most things in batches, so that's easy to live with.

It could be that I'll see something sitting out at a yard sale, or something on craigslist. I try to avoid yard sales because things follow me home. But maybe.

Thanks agiain to everyone, and if I come up with a resolution, I'll be sure to post the progress. Jim
 

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Have you actually tried to use it? Speculation is great, but it might wind up being a non-issue. Give it a whirl and see what happens.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No, Brad, I haven't. I'm going to go ahead and build the sled to use on the full size saw, then I can just change the miter slot runners and experiment with the small one when I have spare time. You're right, it might not even be an issue when I try it. My Grandma used to say "Don't borrow trouble", and that may be what I'm doing here. Thanks for the suggestion. Jim
 
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