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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Front Porch

I feel remiss in not posting any projects lately on LumberJocks, but the truth is I have had a few home projects going on that includes some wood work and a whole lot of sweat. Plus work, plus Christmas gifts of keychains and boxes, I really haven't had the time to create any thing new and exciting. So, I am taking a little time now to share what I have been doing. Building "sweat equity".

The first major problem (project) started when I walked out the front door of my house one day and my foot went right through the slate porch. It shocked me more than anything because I thought the slate was bedded with a solid concrete pad. We have lived here for 25 years. I have always thought this. That is how sturdy it was. Was.

Well, I excavated a little and found crumbled mortar, atop rotted plywood, atop rotted 2×8" joists. Geez, the porch is a little over 300 square feet and I am starting to calculate what some contractor is going to charge me to rip out the old, either reframe it or pour a pad, buy new slate or a reasonable substitute and finish it back so it blends with the rest of the house. I figured a conservative estimate at $10.00 per sq. ft., and there went my repair of my hurricane tilted workshop.

Front Porch - 1

I couldn't do anything then and there, I had to work 36 hours in the next 3 days, so I covered up our shameful little mess with plastic and surrounded the area with crime scene tape, lest some meaningful zealot come knocking on doors and fall through and sue my britches off.

The next chance I had, I did some more excavation (demolition), expecting the worst. Lo and behold, (Murphy must be elsewheres) the rotting only continued a few more feet. Eureka! The rest of the plywood and joists were solid. What a relief I felt. I felt confident enough with my meager skills to tackle this 34 sq. ft. So off we went to the BigBox store and got supplies enough to start with. Luckily, we were able to find natural slate that almost matched. Plus, I also justified an $89.00 chinese wet saw, which will come in handy when we redo the baths.

Front Porch - 2

Front Porch - 3

Front Porch Job - 4

Front Porch - Finished

So, it took a few weeks, working on my days off from the mill, about $600.00, and a lot of elbow grease. It hurt my shop repair fund, but didn't wipe it out.
And then the upstairs floors….
 

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3,649 Posts
Front Porch

I feel remiss in not posting any projects lately on LumberJocks, but the truth is I have had a few home projects going on that includes some wood work and a whole lot of sweat. Plus work, plus Christmas gifts of keychains and boxes, I really haven't had the time to create any thing new and exciting. So, I am taking a little time now to share what I have been doing. Building "sweat equity".

The first major problem (project) started when I walked out the front door of my house one day and my foot went right through the slate porch. It shocked me more than anything because I thought the slate was bedded with a solid concrete pad. We have lived here for 25 years. I have always thought this. That is how sturdy it was. Was.

Well, I excavated a little and found crumbled mortar, atop rotted plywood, atop rotted 2×8" joists. Geez, the porch is a little over 300 square feet and I am starting to calculate what some contractor is going to charge me to rip out the old, either reframe it or pour a pad, buy new slate or a reasonable substitute and finish it back so it blends with the rest of the house. I figured a conservative estimate at $10.00 per sq. ft., and there went my repair of my hurricane tilted workshop.

Front Porch - 1

I couldn't do anything then and there, I had to work 36 hours in the next 3 days, so I covered up our shameful little mess with plastic and surrounded the area with crime scene tape, lest some meaningful zealot come knocking on doors and fall through and sue my britches off.

The next chance I had, I did some more excavation (demolition), expecting the worst. Lo and behold, (Murphy must be elsewheres) the rotting only continued a few more feet. Eureka! The rest of the plywood and joists were solid. What a relief I felt. I felt confident enough with my meager skills to tackle this 34 sq. ft. So off we went to the BigBox store and got supplies enough to start with. Luckily, we were able to find natural slate that almost matched. Plus, I also justified an $89.00 chinese wet saw, which will come in handy when we redo the baths.

Front Porch - 2

Front Porch - 3

Front Porch Job - 4

Front Porch - Finished

So, it took a few weeks, working on my days off from the mill, about $600.00, and a lot of elbow grease. It hurt my shop repair fund, but didn't wipe it out.
And then the upstairs floors….
Wow that's a job alright. But it looks like it turned out ok. Must have been a real shock to fall through the porch though. Glad you did not get hurt.
 

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14,592 Posts
Front Porch

I feel remiss in not posting any projects lately on LumberJocks, but the truth is I have had a few home projects going on that includes some wood work and a whole lot of sweat. Plus work, plus Christmas gifts of keychains and boxes, I really haven't had the time to create any thing new and exciting. So, I am taking a little time now to share what I have been doing. Building "sweat equity".

The first major problem (project) started when I walked out the front door of my house one day and my foot went right through the slate porch. It shocked me more than anything because I thought the slate was bedded with a solid concrete pad. We have lived here for 25 years. I have always thought this. That is how sturdy it was. Was.

Well, I excavated a little and found crumbled mortar, atop rotted plywood, atop rotted 2×8" joists. Geez, the porch is a little over 300 square feet and I am starting to calculate what some contractor is going to charge me to rip out the old, either reframe it or pour a pad, buy new slate or a reasonable substitute and finish it back so it blends with the rest of the house. I figured a conservative estimate at $10.00 per sq. ft., and there went my repair of my hurricane tilted workshop.

Front Porch - 1

I couldn't do anything then and there, I had to work 36 hours in the next 3 days, so I covered up our shameful little mess with plastic and surrounded the area with crime scene tape, lest some meaningful zealot come knocking on doors and fall through and sue my britches off.

The next chance I had, I did some more excavation (demolition), expecting the worst. Lo and behold, (Murphy must be elsewheres) the rotting only continued a few more feet. Eureka! The rest of the plywood and joists were solid. What a relief I felt. I felt confident enough with my meager skills to tackle this 34 sq. ft. So off we went to the BigBox store and got supplies enough to start with. Luckily, we were able to find natural slate that almost matched. Plus, I also justified an $89.00 chinese wet saw, which will come in handy when we redo the baths.

Front Porch - 2

Front Porch - 3

Front Porch Job - 4

Front Porch - Finished

So, it took a few weeks, working on my days off from the mill, about $600.00, and a lot of elbow grease. It hurt my shop repair fund, but didn't wipe it out.
And then the upstairs floors….
Great job Dusty - it looks like it was done professionally. It's funny how necessity and a low budget makes us do repairs and projects that we had no idea we could do. I guess when you think about it, it's just a shop project on a larger scale - look at it awhile and it will come to you how to proceed. Good job.
 

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2,385 Posts
Front Porch

I feel remiss in not posting any projects lately on LumberJocks, but the truth is I have had a few home projects going on that includes some wood work and a whole lot of sweat. Plus work, plus Christmas gifts of keychains and boxes, I really haven't had the time to create any thing new and exciting. So, I am taking a little time now to share what I have been doing. Building "sweat equity".

The first major problem (project) started when I walked out the front door of my house one day and my foot went right through the slate porch. It shocked me more than anything because I thought the slate was bedded with a solid concrete pad. We have lived here for 25 years. I have always thought this. That is how sturdy it was. Was.

Well, I excavated a little and found crumbled mortar, atop rotted plywood, atop rotted 2×8" joists. Geez, the porch is a little over 300 square feet and I am starting to calculate what some contractor is going to charge me to rip out the old, either reframe it or pour a pad, buy new slate or a reasonable substitute and finish it back so it blends with the rest of the house. I figured a conservative estimate at $10.00 per sq. ft., and there went my repair of my hurricane tilted workshop.

Front Porch - 1

I couldn't do anything then and there, I had to work 36 hours in the next 3 days, so I covered up our shameful little mess with plastic and surrounded the area with crime scene tape, lest some meaningful zealot come knocking on doors and fall through and sue my britches off.

The next chance I had, I did some more excavation (demolition), expecting the worst. Lo and behold, (Murphy must be elsewheres) the rotting only continued a few more feet. Eureka! The rest of the plywood and joists were solid. What a relief I felt. I felt confident enough with my meager skills to tackle this 34 sq. ft. So off we went to the BigBox store and got supplies enough to start with. Luckily, we were able to find natural slate that almost matched. Plus, I also justified an $89.00 chinese wet saw, which will come in handy when we redo the baths.

Front Porch - 2

Front Porch - 3

Front Porch Job - 4

Front Porch - Finished

So, it took a few weeks, working on my days off from the mill, about $600.00, and a lot of elbow grease. It hurt my shop repair fund, but didn't wipe it out.
And then the upstairs floors….
GREAT JOB!!!!!!!! It really does look great you can be proud of your work.
 

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Registered
Joined
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146 Posts
Front Porch

I feel remiss in not posting any projects lately on LumberJocks, but the truth is I have had a few home projects going on that includes some wood work and a whole lot of sweat. Plus work, plus Christmas gifts of keychains and boxes, I really haven't had the time to create any thing new and exciting. So, I am taking a little time now to share what I have been doing. Building "sweat equity".

The first major problem (project) started when I walked out the front door of my house one day and my foot went right through the slate porch. It shocked me more than anything because I thought the slate was bedded with a solid concrete pad. We have lived here for 25 years. I have always thought this. That is how sturdy it was. Was.

Well, I excavated a little and found crumbled mortar, atop rotted plywood, atop rotted 2×8" joists. Geez, the porch is a little over 300 square feet and I am starting to calculate what some contractor is going to charge me to rip out the old, either reframe it or pour a pad, buy new slate or a reasonable substitute and finish it back so it blends with the rest of the house. I figured a conservative estimate at $10.00 per sq. ft., and there went my repair of my hurricane tilted workshop.

Front Porch - 1

I couldn't do anything then and there, I had to work 36 hours in the next 3 days, so I covered up our shameful little mess with plastic and surrounded the area with crime scene tape, lest some meaningful zealot come knocking on doors and fall through and sue my britches off.

The next chance I had, I did some more excavation (demolition), expecting the worst. Lo and behold, (Murphy must be elsewheres) the rotting only continued a few more feet. Eureka! The rest of the plywood and joists were solid. What a relief I felt. I felt confident enough with my meager skills to tackle this 34 sq. ft. So off we went to the BigBox store and got supplies enough to start with. Luckily, we were able to find natural slate that almost matched. Plus, I also justified an $89.00 chinese wet saw, which will come in handy when we redo the baths.

Front Porch - 2

Front Porch - 3

Front Porch Job - 4

Front Porch - Finished

So, it took a few weeks, working on my days off from the mill, about $600.00, and a lot of elbow grease. It hurt my shop repair fund, but didn't wipe it out.
And then the upstairs floors….
spot on ol boy , hey is that the same porch on let's see 5 …44 no 541 ah crap down the road from the school?
 

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Registered
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603 Posts
Front Porch

I feel remiss in not posting any projects lately on LumberJocks, but the truth is I have had a few home projects going on that includes some wood work and a whole lot of sweat. Plus work, plus Christmas gifts of keychains and boxes, I really haven't had the time to create any thing new and exciting. So, I am taking a little time now to share what I have been doing. Building "sweat equity".

The first major problem (project) started when I walked out the front door of my house one day and my foot went right through the slate porch. It shocked me more than anything because I thought the slate was bedded with a solid concrete pad. We have lived here for 25 years. I have always thought this. That is how sturdy it was. Was.

Well, I excavated a little and found crumbled mortar, atop rotted plywood, atop rotted 2×8" joists. Geez, the porch is a little over 300 square feet and I am starting to calculate what some contractor is going to charge me to rip out the old, either reframe it or pour a pad, buy new slate or a reasonable substitute and finish it back so it blends with the rest of the house. I figured a conservative estimate at $10.00 per sq. ft., and there went my repair of my hurricane tilted workshop.

Front Porch - 1

I couldn't do anything then and there, I had to work 36 hours in the next 3 days, so I covered up our shameful little mess with plastic and surrounded the area with crime scene tape, lest some meaningful zealot come knocking on doors and fall through and sue my britches off.

The next chance I had, I did some more excavation (demolition), expecting the worst. Lo and behold, (Murphy must be elsewheres) the rotting only continued a few more feet. Eureka! The rest of the plywood and joists were solid. What a relief I felt. I felt confident enough with my meager skills to tackle this 34 sq. ft. So off we went to the BigBox store and got supplies enough to start with. Luckily, we were able to find natural slate that almost matched. Plus, I also justified an $89.00 chinese wet saw, which will come in handy when we redo the baths.

Front Porch - 2

Front Porch - 3

Front Porch Job - 4

Front Porch - Finished

So, it took a few weeks, working on my days off from the mill, about $600.00, and a lot of elbow grease. It hurt my shop repair fund, but didn't wipe it out.
And then the upstairs floors….
Nice job you cant really tell it was repaired
 
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