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This will be my first hollow form and I've got a couple of questions. The first is about design. The wood is seasoned cherry. Should I leave the band or should it disappear? I know it's up to the turner but I'm just not sure. A simple plain design might be best. So, leave it or knock it off?
Next is, do I turn a tenon and rechuck just the form or leave the whole piece mounted to hollow? My thinking is that the longer the piece is the more leverage stress will be put on the chuck and tenon. I chose to get two small forms out of this since this is my first form.
Any advice or direction will be greatly appreciated.
 

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My first thought after seeing the whole thing was, "Man, that thing's on the runway, and ready for takeoff."
Yes, make another tenon, and seperate into 2 pieces unless you have a steady rest.
I won't help with the design. That's between the maker and end user. When you complete the form, post a picture and then we'll beat you up on it. heheeh …......... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

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If it were me, I would leave the band in place, and as Jerry suggests make another tenon and separate the two pieces pronto.

Looking forward to you posting your completed project … you are off to a great start!
 

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Agree with others, make another tenon. As far as the band goes, looks like your on to something, leave it on. Good luck.
 

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Wood Natural material Art Wood stain Hardwood


Cannot add much to what has been said already about dividing. Agree with leave the band might be on to something. As far as using a recess or tenon whatever works for you.

Size of the opening will test your hollowing system and new Sorby hollowing tools. Unless have some bent hollowing tools leave the opening big enough so can get a uniform thickness.

I turned this hollow form which measures 8" in diameter by 4" deep with 4 1/4" opening with nothing but bowl gouges and scrappers. If had a bent hollowing tool at the time life would have been so much easier. I started out with a smaller opening and made it wider as progressed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys for the input. Nice bowl Bill and I do have a swan neck that I de handled to use in the hollowing system it has the 1/4" cutter and round cutter also.
I'm thinking, after I part it off, holding the small tenon and use the tail center and turn the bottom. Finish the foot and chuck it to hollow from inside the foot. Would that hold it secure enough to hollow? Just not sure of how to reverse it once hollowed to finish the bottom.
Planning on working on it some more this afternoon.
 

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Troy, I'm gonna contradict myself and inject my design thoughts on the wood you pictured. What you have right now looks to me like a lidded bowl. It's hiding in all that wood trying desperately not to reveal itself.

Make a 1/4" long tenon. Part it off from the rest of that wood. Install that lidded bowl into your chuck, shape the outside, true up the knob area making sure it's straight, and then get ready to part off the lid. After the lid is parted off, hollow out the bowl, making sure you leave something for the lid to index on. Remove it from the lathe, making sure you mark your jaw position on your tenon.

Now, get yourself a piece of flat wood big enough to make a tenon . Make it round, then punch a hole the same size as the knob on your lid. Glue it in, and after the glue is set, mount it and turn the inside of the lid, fit testing as you go. When you are happy with the inside, remove it from the lathe.

This is where it is strictly a choice of how you want to proceed.

1 You could remount your bowl with the lid attached, and true up any descrepancies on both pieces while finish turning the lid and knob. You will also be removing the tenon you made for the knob. When satisfied, with the knob shape and size, part down to that little nub most turners leave. Then cut if with a saw, break it off or use a chisel to remove it. Now sand it.

2 You could make yourself a friction/jamb chuck, or use a donut chuck, or go to Cole jaws or Longworth chuck and even a vaccum if you have it. Use any of the above to finish turn the lid. You are now done.

3 You could ask me about my new secret tool for completely removing tenons from forms while between centers. After the tenon is removed, then you sand the bottom while still between centers…..... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Jerry for giving me something to think about. For this one though I want to make it a hollow form. I've been working on the hollowing arm for a while now and anxious to try it out.
Ok, I'll bite, what it your secrete tool for removing tenons?
 

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Something along the lines of what Jerry is talking about.

http://www.fingerlakeswoodturners.com/downloads/Two-Piece%20Hollow%20Forms.pdf

Easiest way to remove a tenon is reverse turning using a jam chuck made from scrap and bring up your tail stock for support. I use foam rubber or old rug over my jam chucks to keep from marring. Not sure of the vender but they sell form of jam chuck for hollow forms. Or depending upon design of a bowl or hollow form a donut chuck.

http://montgomerycountywoodturners.org/Documents/Tip26-JamChuckforHollowForms.pdf

http://www.woodturningonline.com/assets/turning_articles/DoughnutChuck.pdf

Many turners including myself start turning a bowl or hollow form between centers to get at a basic design and figure out how will mount it on the lathe whether going to need a faceplate or chuck. Many will even sand and do some finishing on outside before hollowing. I am not that good yet!

Once mounted on/in faceplate or chuck begin hollowing until get a uniform inside thickness. Most will sand and finish inside before reverse turning off the foot or otherwise clean up the bottom.
 

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Troy, send me your personal email to [email protected] I'll send you a couple pictures. It has to stay pretty much incognito until my patent attorney tells me to make it public…..... If you go to that Natural Edge Forum in the Woodturners Forum, somewhere near the beginning of all those comments, posts# 15 and 20 are things I've done. Post #20 shows one item just mounted onto my lathe. That is how I mount all of my wood for rough turning. The tool pictured is not the secret tool. Check it out. It's so simple to use, even a beginner woodturner could do it…..... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·



So here's what came out of the cherry log. im happy with this being it's my first one even though it would be embarrassing if it were ban sawed opened.
The articulated arm worked really good and now that I know it all works well I'll start working on the laser system for it.
 

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Okie dokie, let the beatings begin. Troy, that looks pretty good for your first. It's a keeper. Don't let it go, and 6 months from now, use it to check on your progress. If you see no progress, get another hobby. If you see progress, keep going. You did good. I like it.
It's certainly a lot better looking than my first I was willing to make public. Thanks for sharing…... Jerry (in Tucson)
 
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